North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program
North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program
    Home Users User Directory
 
  PROGRAM
About NARCCAP
About Data
Contact Us
  RESOURCES
For PIs
For Users
    Access Data
  User Directory
  Contributions
  Acknowledgements
  RESULTS
Output Data Catalog
General Results
    NCEP-Driven RCM Runs
Climate Change Results
CRCM+CCSM
CRCM+CGCM3
ECP2+GFDL
HRM3+GFDL
HRM3+HadCM3
MM5I+CCSM
MM5I+HadCM3 NEW!
RCM3+CGCM3
RCM3+GFDL
WRFG+CCSM
WRFG+CGCM3
  SPONSORS
 
User Directory
 

To add your information to the directory, fill out the User Registration Form.
Click here for the directory index.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

John Abatzoglou

email: john.abatzoglou@dri.edu


Research

Fuel treatments for the next 20-50 years need to be planned with respect to future climate projections. Our project is to utilize and refine high-res daily weather and climate information to assess whether current fuel treatments will be able to withstand future changes in the timing and magnitude of extreme fire weather conditions.

Current work includes downscaling daily temp, rh, winds, precip to 8km resolution and to that of stations frequently utilized. We are developing a probabilistic model to assess future changes across multiple models.

We would be interested in comparing our statistical downscaled results to those of the dynamically downscaled models.

Significant findings thus far include large increases in the frequency and window length for extreme fire danger, particularly across the desert SW.

 
 
 

Sommer Abdel-Fattah

email: sommerab@gmail.com

I'm a researcher/post-doctoral fellow working with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) in Burlington Ontario. I'm interested in climate change trends, projections and impacts specifically in the Great Lakes Basin.


Research

I am currently working on a Risk Assessment for the impacts of climate change to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. This includes researching past trends for various variables as well as future projections. The main goal of the research is describe climate change scenarios for the future and assess the risk of impacts to the Department.

The research plan includes gathering data on trends and projections, impacts, vulnerabilities and gaps and performing a nation wide risk assessment through expert collaboration. The NARCAPP data will serve as inputs for necessary trend and projection work. The significance of this research is that it will allow the department to understand current gaps in knowledge and build programs around these, as well as plan for future impacts to the Department.

 
 
 

Anil Acharya

email: acharya_anil@yahoo.com

I am a PhD student at University of Nevada Las Vegas. I am mainly interested in hydrology and climate change.

Research

I am looking at the hydrologic impacts due to climate change (mainly for future periods). In my study, I am looking at the impacts of extreme precipitation events on hydrologic characteristics of watersheds in Las Vegas. I am utilizing the downscaled dataset to fulfill this objective. The downscaled data will be used to build the future climate scenarios and a suitable hydrologic model will be used to observe the likely impacts. The area is very small, so I prefer to use the dataset that is downscaled using some regional climate model or by any other statistical means.

 
 
 

Jafar Aghajanzadeh

email: sterioo@yahoo.com

I study water resource engineering at Shiraz Azad University.


Research

I'm working on my dissertation and it's about forecasting soil moisture for next 100 years. I need GCMs data for my locale to downscale it by dynamic method and find the best statistical model which can predict weather for purposes duration. After all I want to find a model to predict soil moisture considering weather forecasting.

 
 
 

Amir AghaKouchak

email: amir.a@uci.edu

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering University of California, Irvine Irvine, CA Emil: amir.a@uci.edu http://www.aghakouchak.com/

Research
I am particularly interested in quantification of GCM and RCM uncertainties. Our plan is to use NARCCAP data along with other data sets to develop an uncertainty model. Furthermore, we will be using NARCCAP data to study how climate change might impact extreme precipitation events.

 
 
 

Kazi Ahmed

email: kfa09002@engr.uconn.edu

I am a PhD student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Connecticut.


Research

I am planning to use NARCCAP data to investigate the impact of bias correction of dynamically downscaled GCM outputs. I will perform the bias correction of temperature, precipitation and wind data of different GCM-RCM outputs and to find out if correcting the bias can increase their performance when they are used in hydrologic impact studies.

 
 
 

Sadik Ahmed

email: ahmeds86@mcmaster.ca

Ph.D. Student Department of Civil Engineering McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Email:ahmeds86@mcmaster.ca

Research
My proposed research topic is "Climate Change Impact Assessment at Watershed Scale". The objective of my research is to assess climate change impact on hydrology of Spencer Creek Watershed located in Southern Ontario, Canada. I will use Hydrologic Engineering Center's Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) for flow simulation and Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC- RAS) for determining inundation depth and extents.

NARCCAP precipitation and temperature data will be used as input into the HEC-HMS model for countinous and extreme event flow simulation. Expected outputs of the proposed research will be the information and knowledgebase on impact of climate change on the Spencer Creek Watershed. The research output will provide a broad picture of climate change impact at watershed scale and facilitate sustainable management of water resources.

 
 
 

Jay Alder

email: jay.alder@geo.oregonstate.edu
website: http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/alderj/

Graduate Student
Oregon State University

Interests:Climate modeling, GCMs, RegCM3, ENSO


Research

I'm working on a regional downscaling effort at Oregon State University using RegCM3. I am having trouble formatting our NetCDF output to be CF-1.0 compliant so that it properly imports into ArcGIS. I would like access to the NARCCAP output so I can have a working datasets to compare to. I think we'd benefit by being able to compare our 50km North America runs to those on NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Carlos Alean-Rocha

email: calean99@hotmail.com

PhD student at The Mexican Institute of Water Technology (IMTA). Sponsored by the Mexican National Water Commission.


Research

We are interested in nested Regional Climate Models (RCMs) as regionalization tools to provide climate information. We will use NARCCAP precipitation and temperature data to check the outputs of different coupled combinations between global and regional models to try to answer the question: "Among all combinations, which coupled models are perform best throughout the southern U.S. (i.e. South Atlantic States, East South Central States, and West South Central States) and northern Mexico?" We will use a probabilistic methodology to regionalize scenario data for precipitation and temperature throughout the frontier zone given by the set of CGCMs that participate in the Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

 
 
 

Michael Alexander

email: Michael.Alexander@noaa.gov
website: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/people/michael.alexander/

I am a scientist at the NOAA Earth System Research Lab. I received my Ph D from the University of Wisconsin and have been conducting research in the areas of large-scale climate dynamics and air-sea interaction for more than 20 years ago. I've recently become interested in the area of climate extremes.

Research
We are using NARCCAP data to study how climate change might impact heavy precipitation events during summer over the front range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. We are analyzing the daily precipitation values from NARCCAP and examining their distribution with a focus on the top 5% and 1% of events. Composites have also been constructed for the top 30 and how they differ from the present to the future under the A1B scenario. The conditions during the extreme events are also being used as boundary conditions for high resolution (1 km) WRF simulations over the front range. The latter experiments are being conducted by Kelly Mahoney a post doc in the PACE program.

 
 
 

Karim Alizad

email: kalizad@knights.ucf.edu

University of Central Florida

Research
These data is going to be used for a research project at UCF for climate change prediction and water rise in a specific place incorporating the current and future data.

 
 
 

Bob Allen

email: rjallen@ucr.edu

Assistant Professor of Climatology, UC Riverside

Research
Investigation of southern CA climate change, focusing on changes to the hydrological cycle.

 
 
 

Randall Alliss

email: randall.alliss@ngc.com

Dr. Randall J. Alliss
Manager, Atmospheric Effects
Northrop Grumman - TASC
4801 Stonecroft Blvd
Chantilly, VA 20151
703-633-8300x4002
703-449-3400 fax

We are generally interested in regional climate modeling and dynamical downscaling to study future climate impacts.


Research

Our research goals at the highest level include quantifying the impacts of future climate change on life and economy in the Mid-Atlantic States. We plan to use the NARCCAP data to investigate climate impacts over the Mid-Atlantic and Chesapeake Bay regions. We are specifically interested in understanding the impacts on agriculture and marine commerce. We will analyze the NARCCAP simulations of extreme heat, cold, and precipitation events for both the present climate and projected future climates. We will also investigate the impacts of sea-level rise on marine commerce in the Chesapeake Bay. We would like to also use the NARCCAP data to initialize high resolution runs using the WRF model in order to study local impacts. Our research should help to address these questions and to provide estimates of how future weather extremes will affect the economies of the Mid-Atlantic States.

We plan to utilize data from both the GFDL time-slice experiments as well as the NCEP driven runs.

 
 
 

Andrew Allstadt

email: allstadt@wisc.edu
website: http://silvis.forest.wisc.edu/people/Andrew-Allstadt

Postdoc at the University of Wisconsin Madison in the Department of Forestry and Wildlife Ecology.


Research

Our group is interested in the effects of extreme weather events (e.g., droughts, heat waves, cold snaps) on the abundance and distribution of bird species.

 
 
 

Noel Aloysius

email: noel.aloysius@yale.edu

Noel Aloysius is a second year doctoral student at Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He has a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Peradeniya and a MS in Earth System Science and Policy from the University of North Dakota.

Prior to joining FES he held positions as an Instructor in Civil Engineering at University of Peradeniya, Design Engineer and Project Manager at an engineering consulting company in Sri Lanka, Water Resources Engineer at the International Water Management Institute, a not-for-profit international research organization headquartered in Sri Lanka, and Drought Assessment Project Manager at the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium in Grand Forks, North Dakota. His advisor is Professor James Saiers.

At FES his research focuses on the role of climate and land use change in the vulnerability and resilience of water resources in semi-arid and tropical river basins.


Research

The goal of my research is to examine the role of climate change and variability (CCV) and land use and land cover change (LULC)on the vulnerability and resilience of water resources in river basins with complex water infrastructure (e.g. dams) and ecosystem services (e.g. water for food and nature). The research will quantify the spatiotemporal variation of surface and groundwater resources and investigate the ecosystem services that are affected by water availability within the river basin. I will examine these issues by developing hydrological models for river basins which include the Lower Rio Grande in the United States and Mexico and the Congo in Africa. Specifically, the proposed research will seek to answer the following research questions:

  1. What are the historical changes and variability in climate (temperature and precipitation) and the changes in land use and land cover and how these changes affected the basin water resources?
  2. How much water is diverted to ecosystem services such as production of food and water supply for people?
  3. How will basin hydrology change due to deforestation, logging concessions, agriculture expansion, and urban land use expansion?
  4. What are the projected changes and variability in climate (precipitation and temperature) and how will this change the basin hydrology when combined with the changes in question 3? I will, specifically, address how the projected increase in the frequency of extreme events such as droughts will change the basin water availability in space and time.
  5. How will the basin hydrology change with the inclusion of water infrastructure such as dams combined with changes in question 3 and 4?
  6. What are the strategies required to improve the human welfare and ecosystem functioning while preserving the resilience of the system?

Answering these research questions require the use of hydrological models that define and simulate the required processes. These models have to be calibrated and validated before using them for inference. When a calibrated model is used to project future changes for a new set of land use and climate scenario, the projected changes inherit an increased uncertainty, because with the new scenario the boundary conditions (e.g. land use) have changed and so does the parameters associated with them. In order to fully understand the changes in the parameters, the model has to be validated with a new set of observed data resulted from the new boundary conditions. This is not plausible, especially for climate change impact studies. The following research question will help to address this issue,

  • How will the model parameters (associated with the boundary conditions such as land use and climate) change for a set of different boundary conditions and their respective observed outcome? How can this information be used to address the uncertainties in future projections?
 
 
 

Caspar Ammann

email: ammann@ucar.edu

I'm a project scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, engaged in various global and regional climate analyses, interpretations and translations of climate knowledge for applications. My interests include the combination of observational, model and theoretical information and knowledge about climate and weather to advance prediction and projection of weather/climate for regions. I do this by studying climate variability and change across time scales, covering past-present-future.
I'm a member of the core team of the National Climate Predictions and Projections platform (NCPP) to develop a community platform to generate and disseminate useful climate knowledge for different applications in collaboration with users groups. The three key pillars are "data" accessibility, applying "scientific knowledge" behind the data, and "translating" the knowledge and data for a more informed use in different applications.

Research
A key component of the research includes the evaluation of downscaling capabilities and characterization of the high-resolution data in comparison to observations. This forms the foundation of local/regional applications. Secondly, I'm interested in asking science-informed questions about the applications and evaluate the observational and modeling design and tools for their usefulness towards these questions.
NARCCAP offers a fantastic matrix of cross-GCM/RCM combinations to study the downscaling capabilities and skills at this time. I'd like to apply these data for different uses in water-related applications (estimating stream flow, studying changes in seasonal cycle, ie. shifts) as well as their use in estimating potential in wind and solar alternative energy production. Finally, the NARCCAP distribution offers the diversity of data to study how consistent trends in indices of climate are across different model combinations.

 
 
 

Valentine Anantharaj

email: vga1@msstate.edu
website: http://www.gri.msstate.edu

For a profile please see:
http://www.gri.msstate.edu/about/dir_info.php?d=1597


Research

Project Title: Sustainable Management of Coastal Forest Ecosystems under a Changing Climate in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

The forest and wetlands ecosystems along the coasts of the Northern Gulf of Mexico, trying to recover from the devastations of hurricane Katrina, are faced with increased stress from the changing climate. In order to develop appropriate adaptation strategies, the forest management specialists are in need of relevant regional future climate projects at spatial scales that are meaningful. Climate models and global reanalysis datasets have provided long term climate simulations and reanalysis of past, present, and future climate change. The available IPCC AR4 climate assessments are at spatial scales that are too coarse for the decision making needs of the Gulf Coast. Hence, we propose to dynamically downscale selected simulations for regional climate projections. We will incorporate the downscaled scenarios into LANDIS, a Decision Support Tool (DST) for forest ecosystems management.

Our approach involves: (a) assessment of the continental scale simulations from the NARCCAP for use with LANDIS; (b) downscaling of a set of NARCCAP to 10x10 km2 resolutions; (c) simulating forests ecosystem changes under the projected regional climate using LANDIS; (d) generating and evaluating a suite of hypothetical forest management decisions for one IPCC emission scenarios; and (e) incorporate our results and products into the NOAA Ecosystems Data Assembly Center (EDAC) in order to make them available to a broader community stakeholders in the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA).

The focus of this study addresses the restoration and conservation of coastal wetlands and estuarine ecosystems priority issues.

 
 
 

Theresa Andersen

email: tkande@iastate.edu

Iowa State University


Research

Main research goals

  • determine if climate models indicate any seasonal, diurnal, and multi-year trends in wind speeds
  • determine if the model wind speed trends are similar to the observed
  • motivated by research done by Pryor et al. where observed trends show wind speeds are generally decreasing across the US

Research methods

  • ncdump data from netcdf files
  • write fortran programs to extract data (particular hours and/or gridpoints)
  • use ferret to plot data and analyze trends

Research plan
Currently analyzing MM5 wind speed data. Would like to expand the study to include the other NARCCAP models wind speed output

What data are needed
Surface wind speed data from RSM, and other levels and/or models if time permits.

Anticipated findings or significance of work
The models pick up the significant time history trends and seasonal trends; the models do not represent the diurnal trends well

 
 
 

Bob Anderson

email: bobanderson@permaloc.com
website: http://www.permaloc.com


Research

Improved source control methodology for urban storm water

 
 
 

Bruce T. Anderson

email: brucea@bu.edu

Bruce T. Anderson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Environment at Boston University. He serves as a Research Consultant for the Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment (NECIA) project and heads the Experimental Center for Remote Observations of Production (ECROP). He has also served as the Associate Chair for the Department. He has been a Royal Society Visiting Fellow, a National Research Council Fellow and a NOAA Visiting Scientist Fellow. His research interests include: Regional impacts of climate variability; Large-scale and regional atmospheric dynamics and hydrology; Coupled ocean-atmosphere modes of variability; and Historic and future climate trends within observations and climate-simulation models. He received his Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1998 and graduated with a B.S. in Physics from University of California, Santa Barbara in 1994.


Research

We plan on using the NARCCAP data to help identify and analyze non-linear behavior in the time evolution of climate parameters derived from global and regional climate change predictions. While many climate parameters — such as global and regional temperatures- show a quasi-linear response to changes in radiative forcing associated with increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, other parameters — such as water availability, heat indices and extreme event occurrences — may behave in more complex ways. We have developed a method for using spatio-temporal data from global and regional climate forecasts to identify whether they show non-linear time evolutions. These non-linear evolutions can include increasing/decreasing sensitivity with time, as well as "turning" points in which initial responses differ in both sign and magnitude from longer-term responses. Preliminary results from regional climate forecasts for the Northeastern US, as well as from global climate forecasts for the Western US, indicate a strong non-linear response in soil moisture, with initial increases in both regions, followed by substantial drops once CO2 concentrations reach twice pre-industrial levels. This type of information can subsequently be used for local and region mitigation and adaptation activities in response to global climate change.

We will also use the NARCCAP data to further investigate physical and socio-economic impacts that arise from regional climate variations resulting from increased greenhouse gas concentrations over the next century. Previous results have focused upon the summertime climate for the Northeastern US. In this region, overall summertime precipitation totals are expected to increase over the northern and southern portions of the domain but decrease across the central portions; heavy-rainfall events are expected to increase across almost the entire domain, both with respect to frequency as well as intensity. Increased evaporation combined with increased temperatures are also expected to significantly increase the daily maximum heat index for the region; in addition, the number of days with extremely high heat-index values are expected to increase by approximately 450% and for certain regions days with heat index values that reach 32.2°C (90°F) — the level of "extreme caution" —could occur approximately 40-50% of the time during summer. Future research will focus on refining these results using data derived from the NARCCAP. In addition, future work will examine similar hydrologic variations over the southwestern U.S., which is expected to be strongly and imminently impacted by anthropogenic-induced climate change. In these regions, the combination of warmer regional temperatures, recurrent drought, and increasing populations all point to future conflicts among water users.

 
 
 

Christopher J. Anderson

email: christopher.j.anderson@noaa.gov

Christopher J. Anderson is Lead Mesoscale Modeler at the NOAA/ESRL/GSD in Boulder, CO.

For the past 2 years, his primary task has been to manage all weather forecast demonstration projects within ESRL/GSD/FAB. These typically include forecasts of 1-day to 3-day lead time. An effort has been established to develop regional climate modeling techniques for assessments of extremes in precipitation. Also, connections have been established with the Western Water Assessment. Prior to Christophers work at NOAA/ESRL, he was employed at Iowa State University where he contributed to the Project to Intercompare Regional Climate Simulations and the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Project.


Research

  1. Examination of warm season precipitation extremes including daily rates and water cycle dynamics.
  2. Examination of Colorado River Basin variables that are critical to hydrological impacts, such as snow pack, run off, and summertime monsoon precipitation. Assess impacts by working with hydrologists and water managers.
  3. Examination of winter time precipitation and snow pack in the Sierra Mountains.

 
 
 

Faron Anslow

email: fanslow@eos.ubc.ca

Post Doctoral Researcher at University of British Columbia


Research

Our research group is working on model simulations of glaciers across north america during the past 30 years (using NARR) and into the future hopefully using NARRCAP.

We will be looking at the surface energy balance of glaciers to determine surface mass balance and, consequently, their response to climate. To generate the surface energy balance we will be using surface and pressure-level variables of moisture, condensed species, radiation fluxes, temperature and pressure (roughly speaking).

We anticipate that, using a range of simulated future climate, we will be able to constrain the magnitude of ice volume loss (or gain) of North America over the next hundred years or so.

 
 
 

Richard Anyah

email: anyah@ucar.edu

Richard Anyah is a Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University and also currently a Visiting Scientist at NCAR, in MMM Division under the UCAR-Africa Initiative.

He got his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science in Summer, 2005 from North Carolina State University under the direction of Prof. Fredrick Semazzi. He then moved to Rutgers University in Fall, 2005 as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Science and then became a Research Associate Scientist from Fall, 2006 the position he still holds to date. Currently he is also organizing a Regional Climate Modeling Inter-comparison Project for the Greater Horn of Africa (AFRMIP), which is partially funded by NSF.


Research

Richard's primary research focus has been on understanding land surface-atmospheric interactions and feedbacks and the coupled climate variability of the two intimately connected systems. In particular, he has been interested in studying the physical and dynamical mechanisms and role large inland freshwater lakes and high mountains plays on Eastern Africa Climate variability and change. He has used regional climate models as the primary investigative tool over the past several years.

At Rutgers he has also been in a broad interdisciplinary collaboration with a diverse group of scientists to study the impact of groundwater reservoir (water table dynamics) on the simulated hydroclimatic variability over North America

Therefore, his interests on NARCCAP are twofold:

  1. Dynamical Dowscaling of NARCCAP RCM and time slice output over North America to investigate characteristic variability in the hydrological cycle and/or hydroclimatic conditions over North America and specific sub-regions.
  2. As the PI of NSF-funded AFRMIP project he would also like to initiate interaction and collaboration not only with the PI.s of NARCCAP, but also NARCCAP users in order to learn useful organization lessons and challenges that could help in planning AFRMIP activities.

 
 
 

Miguel Arango

email: marango@ksu.edu

I am Miguel Arango, PhD student in Soil Science at Kansas State University.

Research
In my research I am looking at the effect of future climate change scenarios on N2O emission from crops in Kansas. The future scenarios will be based on IPCC AB1 scenario. I am going to use DNDC model to predict N2O emission, and for that I need climatic data (precipitation and temperature) gather from NARCCAP. With that I would be able to test different management practices that could potentially reduce the emissions of N2O at regional level.

 
 
 

Shamarokh Arjumand

email: arjumas@mcmaster.ca

I am a first year graduate student of University of McMaster. I am mainly interested in climate change and hydrology. My research interest is climate change impact study on water resources.


Research

The aims of my study:

  • To investigate the impact of climate change and variability on surface and groundwater flows for future period in Sixteen mile creek watershed, Ontario, Canada
  • To analyze how the uncertainty of surface flows due to climate change interacts to the uncertainty of groundwater flows.
  • Use hydrological model MIKE SHE /MIKE II after downscaling data (by SDSM) from Canadian Regional Climate model (CRCM).

Right now I would like to use NARCCAP data for a term project to learn to compare the downscaled result from regional model to observations (meteorological station is Toronto airport). My goal is to compare a few meteorological fields such as temperature, precipitation.

After completion my term project, I will start my master’s research to work with hydrological model.

 
 
 

yog aryal

email: yaryal@uwyo.edu

I am Grad Student at University of Wyoming. I am doing my MS is Civil Engineering and my concentration is in Water Resources.


Research

The globe has already witnessed the effect of climate change and availability of water has been the most focused area of research in recent decades. Owing to rise in water demand and looming climate change, the drought scenarios are becoming worse in recent years. Drought, a natural hazard, can be characterized by multiple climatologic and hydrological parameters. For the assessment of drought characteristics and mitigation measures, understanding of these parameters is very necessary.

Recently many climate models are developed and are being updated. In my MS thesis research I want to see the uncertainty associated with the models in predicting the future drought scenario in different representative climate locations across the United State. So I need climatologic and hydrological data for the analysis.

 
 
 

Toby Ault

email: toby.ault@cornell.edu

Asst. Prof., EAS, Cornell Univ.


Research

My main use of NARCCAP data will entail work to understand seasonal transitions (e.g., the "start of spring") in North America using phenolgically relevant variables.

 
 
 

Htay Aung

email: htayaung19@gmail.com

I am studying at Hiroshima University, Japan for Master Degree. In my research, I am going to carry out comparative analysis of the impact by hydrological dam on the watershed area.


Research

In my research, I have to find out the relationship of Forest Cover, and the water quality and amount of Hydro dam. Moreover, I have to do assessment on the impact of Hydro dam on downstream watershed area. I have to carry out comparative analysis among 2000, 2005 , 2009, 2013 something like that.

 
 
 

Diana Avila

email: dyemilet@gmail.com

Working at the National Institute of Forestry, Agricultural and Livestock Research (INIFAP) in northeastern Mexico. My line of research is forest fires.


Research

I want to develop an investigation to determine the distribution of forest fires under scenarios of climate change, scaled to the northeast region of Mexico. And I want to know the processes to develop or palicar models and data for smaller scale.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Meghna Babbar-Sebens

email: meghna@oregonstate.edu
website: http://cce.oregonstate.edu/people/faculty/babbar-sebens.html

Assistant Professor
School of Civil and Construction Engineering
Oregon State University
Rm. 211, Owen Hall Corvallis, OR, 97331


Research
The main goal of our research work is to investigate novel human-computer collaborative (HCC) approaches to plan and design for watershed problems under conditions of climate uncertainty. We use a combination of hydrologic models, optimization algorithms, visualization interfaces, etc. to develop the HCC approaches. The overall HCC framework helps stakeholders learn about how their watershed responds to various drivers (including climatic drivers) and search for optimized and adaptive plans to manage the watershed. We are interested in using the RCM downscaled predictions of precipitation, temperature, humidity, and wind speeds to forecast hydrologic responses of the watershed and assess the impact of various extreme event (e.g. floods) mitigation and adatation strategies. The work will help stakeholders use an integrated decision support framework to plan for the future, and help policy makers and agencies create adaptation strategies for their watersheds with the help of stakeholder collaborations.

 
 
 

Daniel Bader

email: dab2145@columbia.edu

Daniel Bader is a Programmer at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University. He works with Dr. Cynthia Rosenzweig's Climate Impacts at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Presently, he is assisting the group with projects focusing on climate change impacts in New York City and New York State. In addition, he is working on projects that are exploring climate change impacts in the Southeastern United States and Central America.


Research

The Climate Impacts Group at NASA GISS is interested in NARCCAP output for several potential applications:

  1. Drive further downscaling with the WRF-ARW model to the metropolitan level
  2. Directly drive impact assessment models (of agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and/or water resource management)
  3. Examine the sensitivity of large-scale circulation patterns to climate scenarios
  4. Determine the statistics of extreme events in participating models
  5. Evaluate the ensemble and member statistics to determine whether NARCCAP-like projects are justified for climate impact assessments in other regions of the world.
Of primary initial interest is the downscaled 20th Century climate scenario, followed by the A1B scenarios in the mid 21st Century.

 
 
 

Mohammad Taha Bahadori

email: mohammab@usc.edu


Research
In my project we are aimed to model the spatial-temporal relationship of the extreme values. The motivation for this project stems from the observation that quite often the extreme events show a spatial-temporal dependencies. For a geologic example, after the three earthquakes [Chile (February 2010), Christchurch (February 2011) and Japan (March 2011)] on three corners of the Pacific Ocean, seismologists anticipate another big earthquake in the west coast of the North America.

For example, El Niño climate patterns which affect Pacific tropical regions in periods of several years and information bursts in social networks which propagate across the network.
In the first step of the research, we have modeled the extremes as GEV random processes with its location parameter capturing the spatial-temporal dependencies. Currently a linear model is considered for the location parameter to keep the model analytically tractable. We plan to continue this project by considering more complex models which capture more details while the model is still applicable to a broad range of applications. Efficient large scale optimization algorithms will also be developed to aid the inference process in the large datasets.
Prior work in this area mainly captures one of spatial or temporal effects and this work will be one of the first models to jointly capture spatial-temporal effects. Research in this field can also lead to better understanding of phenomena such as the Climate Change or dependency of stock market across the world.

 
 
 

Barry Baker

email: bbaker@tnc.org

Barry Baker, Ph.D. is currently working as ecosystem scientist for The Nature Conservancy's Climate Change Team. He received his doctorate from Colorado State University in 1991 where his research focused on the effects of climate change on grassland/livestock ecosystems. More recently he has been using climate and dynamic vegetation models to identify potential impacts of climate change on ecosystems in northwestern Yunnan China. In addition he is working with several universities, and national laboratories in the US to conduct regional-scale climate change vulnerability and impact analyses and incorporating results into conservation planning. His research interests include bioclimatology, biogeography, and terrestrial ecosystem modeling for predicting the impacts of climate change on biodiversity especially in grassland and high altitude ecosystems.


Research

Barry is collaborating with several vegetation modelling groups (SAGE, LPJ, MC1, and Century) to simulate impacts of climate change on terrestrial systems. He will be using the data provided by the NARCCAP as climate forcings for the various vegetation models. Results will be used to help guide conservation strategies and evaluate ecosystem processes.

 
 
 

Marc Baldo

email: mlb-narccap@admin.softhome.net
website: http://www.climatechangedss.com

I am a water resource engineer working with Riverside Technology, inc.

Research
Our primary interest in the NARCCAP data is the ability to use the higher resolution to complement our existing CMIP3 downscaled data. We are working under a NOAA-Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project to combine weather service models with climate change in a web-based framework.

 
 
 

zhenhao bao

email: zhenhao_bao@yahoo.com

I got PhD in climatology in Tokyo Metropolitan University, and now am researching a project about regional climate variability, simulation, and forecast in Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communalities, University of Regina, Canada as a research associate. Research interesting is mainly in rainfall variability and regional flood/drought,and their association with atmosphere circulation anomalies.


Research

By studying and comparing observed data and modelling data, we will analyze regional climate characteristics in present and future, and understand which climate variables can be available to forecast in decade scales for present climate modelling.

 
 
 

Daniel Barandiaran

email: dbarandiaran@gmail.com

I am a Master's student at UC Santa Cruz, studying future climate impacts. Received Bachelor's from University of Northern Colorado in meteorology.


Research

My research will be looking at changes in water resources for the western U.S. I will be focusing on three river basins: the Columbia, the Colorado, and the Sacramento/San Joaquin. To assess any changes, I will be looking at snow depth, total runoff, total precipitation and temperature. I expect that snow cover will decrease for all river basins, and that the timing of peak runoff will shift to earlier in the year. This will have a significant effect on water resource management, and these changes need to be anticipated as much as possible to reduce the effect they will have on cities and agricultural interests in the western U.S.

 
 
 

Michael Barbachem

email: mbarb002@odu.edu

I am a Doctor of Engineering student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at ODU.

Research
I am interested in using the NARCCAP data to perform statistical downscaling of precipitation and temperature data for water supply planning in southeast Virginia. The data will be used to develop input datasets to (1) drive neural network models for several rivers serving as surface water supplies, and, (2) estimate changes in reservoir evaporation rates.

 
 
 

Sasha Baroiant

email: sasha@admenergy.com

I work at an firm that provides energy efficiency evaluation measurement and verification (EM&V) services.

Research
I measure the impacts of energy efficiency programs for several gas and electric utility companies and public utility commissions. Part of the work involves cost effectiveness comparisons between energy efficiency and generation. Accurate information regarding expected energy savings over the next ten to 20 years are needed for proper comparisons. I've been using TMY3 data in the past, but I am concerned that usage of TMY3 data results in underestimation of the summer air conditioning energy usage in certain parts of the country. I'm looking for an acceptable alternative to TMY3 - preferably derived from trending historical data.

 
 
 

Carl Barrette

email: carl.barrette@cen.ulava.ca

I am working for ArcticNet, a network of centres of excellence of Canada has a climate data analyst.

Research
The work we are presently undertaking is part of the general mandate of ArcticNet to produce four Integrated Regional Impact Studies (IRISes) dedicated to the consequences of changes on the society and ecosystems of the canadian Arctic and Subarctic. For each IRIS, a climate chapter is produced and a portion of this chapter focuses on future climate changes. We use climate model data, mainly minimum, maximum and mean air temperature, precipitations and wind speed, for current and future periods to compute climate change indicators that are relevant to various scientific aspects addressed in each IRIS.

 
 
 

Elaine Barrow

email: elaine.barrow@sasktel.net

I am an Adjunct Professor at University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, with expertise in climate scenario construction. PhD from the University of East Anglia, UK. Over 15 years experience in climate scenario construction, past member of IPCC-TGICA, past Principal Investigator for the Canadian Climate Impacts Scenarios project. Currently working with Prof. Dave Sauchyn and Dr. Jeannine-Marie St. Jacques on a project to construct scenarios of hydroclimate variability in the Prairies region.


Research

Shifts in the distribution of water resources have been identified as the major risk from climate change in the Prairies region. The major challenge from climate change in this region is not a shift in average climate, but rather the amplification of climate extremes and departures from average conditions - excessive moisture and drought. NARCCAP data will be used to analyse low-frequency hydroclimate variability over the South Saskatchewan, Missouri and Assiniboine River basins, with the aim of constructing hydroclimate scenarios for these regions which include a variability component. We wish to analyse results from several RCMs over this region.

 
 
 

Rebecca Barthelmie

email: rbarthel@indiana.edu

My research is focused on wind resource characterization and wind turbine wakes, including offshore wind energy.

Research
My research goals at present are to work with NARCAP data to explore the potential changes in climate in the Midwest into the middle of the current century.

 
 
 

Samantha Basile

email: sjbasile@umich.edu

Graduate Student, Master of Engineering in Applied Climate
Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences
University of Michigan


Research

I plan to use NARCCAP data in a final research project for my Regional Scale Climate: Downscaling Techniques and Applications class. My project goal is to compare statistical and dynamical downscaling of predicted precipitation and temperature variables over New York State. I have chosen New York State for its topographic diversity, which includes several mountain ranges and the intersection of the Mohawk and Hudson River Valleys. The data I will be comparing with NARCCAP data is Maurer Bias Correction Spatial Disaggregation (BCSD) CMIP5 RCP 8.5 model data (with the possible inclusion of Maurer BCSD CMIP3 SRES A2 data for direct comparison to NARCCAP data). I will be using the climatological period between 2041 and 2070 broken into decadal intervals for compatibility with planning timescales. I will use NCAR Command Language in creating my project figures and I plan to include seasonally averaged spatial plots, time series plots, and spatial difference plots of my chosen vari ables.

 
 
 

Satish Bastola

email: sbastola@coaps.fsu.edu

I work on hydrological modelling

Research
I am working on the development of river routing model for the assessment of climate change impact on hydrological processes.

 
 
 

Guzin Bayraksan

email: guzinb@sie.arizona.edu

I am a faculty member in the Systems and Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Arizona. I am working on water resources management under uncertainty.

Research
My research revolves around the nexus of water and energy. In particular, the project I am currently inquiring for relates to self-sustainability of a community in the northern part of Arizona. I have collected well samples and tested their water chemistry, which I am using to restrict the water that can be sent to differing demand nodes and help determine the amount of energy that can be created by the power plant node. The other demands are determined partly by the temperatures in the region on a monthly basis. What I am looking for is models that show possible future temperature scenarios that I can use as inputs into my model. I would like to then examine the impact of those different climate scenarios on the distribution of the water types to the demand nodes. I believe that this data will help to build a more robust model and show interesting results under differing weather circumstances. This project is funded by the National Science Foundatation.

 
 
 

Jordan Beamer

email: beamerj@onid.orst.edu
website: http://oregonstate.edu/gradwater/jordan-beamer

I am currently in my 3rd years of PhD program in Water Resources Civil Engineering from Oregon State University. My dissertation title is "Modeling of Freshwater Runoff into Prince William Sound".


Research

Currently adapting a snowmelt-runoff hydrologic model to estimate historic freshwater runoff into Prince William Sound and greater Gulf of Alaska. Once calibrated, the model will run in real time to forecast runoff using weather observations and short term forecasts. Model output will serve as a boundary condition for an ocean circulation model.

My next step is to run some test simulations using projected GCM data as the meteorological forcings, as many researchers and managers are interested in future projections of runoff from rain, glacier- and snow-melt into the Gulf of Alaska.

 
 
 

Eban Bean

email: beaneb@ecu.edu

I am an assistant professor at East Carolina University in the Engineering Department and Institute for Coastal Science and Policy (ICSP).


Research

My research focuses on urban stormwater management primarily. However, I am also interested in coastal plain hydrology and coastal water quality dynamics. I am interested in downscaled models of the SE US and anticipating effects on stormwater management practices in the context of design standards.

 
 
 

Ali Behrangi

email: ali.behrangi@jpl.nasa.gov

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Climate, Ocean, & Earth Science E-mail: Ali.Behrangi@jpl.nasa.gov

Research
Using NARCCAP data, I am interested in investigating precipitation characteristics and associated uncertainties. This includes a precipitation study using a combination of satellites, models and gauges. Moreover, I am interested in the assessment of climate change impacts on water resources with applications in decision making and adaptation strategies.

 
 
 

Kate Behrmank

email: behrmank@gmail.com


Research
I am working on understanding how biomass of switchgrass can be expected to change over time. This research uses a stochastic process-oriented to model, ALMANAC, to predict the biomass for current and future biomass. Several different climate scenarios will be analyzed across the easter United States. This work will help determine where long-term sustainable fields should be located to maximize biomass of switchgrass for biofuel production.

 
 
 

Ehsan Beigi

email: ebeigi3@tigers.lsu.edu

I am Ph.D. student and research assistant at Louisiana State University, My research interest is impact studies of climate change on surface water and groundwater.

Research
I am looking to link the global circulation models (GCMs) to a downscaling dynamic model (such as mm5 or WRF) in order to build a regional climate model over Louisian State. Also, I am interested in comparing my own downscaled climate results with NARCCAP. Then, it is aimed to couple the output with hydrologic models to investigate impacts of climate change on water and groundwater resources.

 
 
 

Dino Bellugi

email: dinob@mit.edu
website: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/people/dinob

PhD in Earth Science and Computational Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
Postdoctoral fellow, Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Science, MIT


Research

Research goals: understanding the shallow landsliding response of a landscape (i.e. abundance, location, and size of shallow landslides) to changes in intensity, duration, and frequency of extreme rainfall events, as may brought about by climate change.

Research methods and plan:

  • Generate regional IDF rainfall statistics for different climate scenarios using multiple models.
  • Compare across models and to historic values.
  • Couple a mechanistic, 3-dimensional slope stability model with a novel search algorithm to predict discrete landslides.
  • Apply landslide prediction procedure with the diverse rainfall triggering scenarios.
  • Compare to historical landslide inventories.

Anticipated findings: Change in the abundance, location, and size of shallow landslides

 
 
 

Soumaya Belmecheri

email: sub30@psu.edu


Research

The aim of my research is to investigate behavioral response and management decisions by farmers in Pennsylvania, especially two group of growers: fruit and wine growers. In the climate projections i will use a simple analysis to depict one 'normal' temperature year, one cold, and one warm in the future. The strategy of the 'normal' year is to depict a likely growing season in the future analogous to one anomalous year in the past 10-20 years. These 3 future temperature scenario years will be used to run model to predict pests and insect phenology. The idea is to propose these scenarios to growers and ask them to report their management decision (spraying, etc.). I am looking at hourly data of temperature, precipitation, pressure, RH and solar radiation.

 
 
 

Ed Bensman

email: ebensman@nd.edu
website: http://crc.nd.edu

My name is Ed Bensman. I hold a Ph.D. in meteorology from Florida State University (2000) under the direction of Prof. T.N. Krishnamurti. My professional interests are in Numerical Weather Prediction from planetary (climate) scale to mesoscale phenomena. I am currently with the Center for Research Computing at the University of Notre Dame. I have a number of colleagues here who are interested in climate simulations for the purposes of: migration of aquatic and terrestrial invasive species; largely over the Great Lakes region of the U.S. I am also working with other investigators evaluating the role of climate change on malaria control and eradication over the Lake Victoria region of Africa and in Indonesia; both of which are obviously outside the domain of NARCCAP. I was not familiar with NARCCAP until I read about it on the ESG web page. My research interest is described below.


Research

My specific interest in the NARCCAP data is two-fold: one as a teaching tool for multi-disciplinary researchers interested in regional climate change and also as a . Without the benefit of evaluating the NARCCAP data I cannot fully comment on its utility. I can however speculate that these data might fulfill the needs of investigators to the point that it is unnecessary for me to perform similar regional climate simulations, forced from a global model, over the Great Lakes region. My short term interest is in evaluating the utility of these NARCCAP data for investigators locally. My longer term goal is regional climate modeling over the Great Lakes region using the new WRF3.0 nested regional climate modeling capability.

 
 
 

Robert Beyer

email: rdbeyer@iastate.edu

Iowa State University


Research

Main Research Goals:

Compare the dew formation and dissipation data output by RCMs against observational data to investigate end-user usefulness-especially with regard to agriculture and food security.

Research Methods:

Conduct comparative studies between RCM output and observational data to assess the temporal and spatial precision and accuracy of RCMs with regard to dew formation and dissipation. Furthermore, this information will permit deeper investigation of RCM to observational disparities such that RCM improvements will become beneficial to the end-user.

Research Plan:

  1. Investigate the ability of RCMs to replicate/generate surface wetness data.
  2. Conduct statistical analysis of model outputs against observational data to assess the temporal and spatial precision and accuracy of RCMs.
  3. Investigate RCM bias with regard to dew formation and dissipation.
  4. Report the findings of this investigation to appropriate publications for dissemination.

Data Needed:

All biogeophysical variables that affect the formation and dissipation of dew.

Anticipated Findings or Significance:

This research will investigate RCMs' treatment of dew formation and dissipation with the intention to improve RCM projections and data products for end-user application-in this particular case, agriculture.

 
 
 

Uma Bhatt

email: usbhatt@alaska.edu

I am writing a proposal to investigate downscaled variables in Alaska. We have performed a CCSM downscaled run from 1980-2100, but I would like some other information to provide some error analysis. I am interested in interior Alaska and from looking at your domain, I think it should be in there albeit at the boundary.


Research

See above. It would help my analysis to have multiple downscaled sets over Interior Alaska to help planners prepare for the future. We have one simulation based on AR5 but including the rich array of runs you have produced would strengthen our proposed project.

 
 
 

Rashi Bhushan

email: rashi345@gmail.com

I am a civil engineering graduate student doing research on climate change impacts on water resources.


Research

Main research goals: To study impacts of climate change and variability on water resources around the world.

Research methods: Multi-Objective optimisation modeling to assess the performance of various water supply options, Deamand forecast modeling, stochastics.

Research plan: We propose to address the issue of water supply scarcity and uncertainty in coastal cities by combining the supplies of reservoir water and water from desalination. Desalination though a reliable source of water for coastal cities has high-energy use, making it an expensive option. Reservoir water on the other hand, is cheaper due to its relatively small cost of transportation to the cities, but is often limited and variable in its availability. We observe that combining the operation of a desalination plant with a water supply reservoir leads to more cost efficient and reliable water production than if both were to be operated separately.

What data are needed: We want Regional climate model (RCM) data for precipitation and temperatures on daily/monthly scales to model the streams'/watersheds' response to climate change.

Anticipated findings or significance of work: We want to model a joint reservoir-desalination system as a multi-objective optimization problem with risk, resilience, and vulnerability as the objective functions, and cost as a constraint. From the tradeoff curve of the 3, we would derive insights into the potential of seawater desalination as a means of managing uncertainty.

 
 
 

Michela Biasutti

email: biasutti@ldeo.columbia.edu
website: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~biasutti/

I am a researcher at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University.


Research

At this point, I intend to analyze the regional model climate change simulations to look at seasonal changes in mean temperature and precipitation and of daily extremes (heat waves, heavy rainfall, and the like) in the Southeast US. For this work I expect to use only surface temperature, precipitation and dew point.

In the future, I would be interested in looking into more details at the inter-model differences due to the GCM driver versus due to the actual RCM. For this work I would expect that I will need more variables, related both to circulation and to the details of convective rainfall.

 
 
 

Melissa Biegenwald

email: Melissa.Biegenwald@usace.army.mil

I am a temporary student employee in Hydrology and Hydraulics at the Corps of Engineers, my supervisor is Pat Foley

Research
The Corps is doing a research study on potential climate change impacts on flooding of the Red River of the North. The Corps proposal is to enter NARCCAP and evaluate how magnitude and timing of flooding at Fargo, ND, might change. All large historic floods have been a combination of snowmelt and precipitation and one goal is to see how the climate data performs for that type of flood.

 
 
 

Santiago Bisso Urrutigoity

email: bissourrutig@wisc.edu

Industrial and Systems Engineering senior student at University of Wisconsin-Madison


Research

I'll use the NARCCAP data to run a building modelling framework, called Back of the Envelope calculator, which is a simplified version of eQuest. I'll need the seasonal average for 2043 for the variables tas, huss, and ps.

The goal of the project is to address the impact of climate change on UW-Madison's Campus energy consumption and economics.

 
 
 

Rasel Biswas

email: rasel200109@yahoo.com

I am a graduate student at Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada in Mathematics and Statistics department.

Research
I intend to analize the climate data, expert input, and the extreme precipitation for the St. John's, NL, Canada area. I am interested in the impact of climate change and adaptation to the climate effect to life in NL.

 
 
 

Brian Blanton

email: brian_blanton@renci.org

Senior Scientist, Oceanographer
Renaissance Computing Institute
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Research

North Carolina's coastal region is impacted by several severe extratropical storms each year, and by a hurricane about once every three years. These events cause substantial damage to the coastal infrastructure through nearshore wind and wave action on barrier islands (erosion) and inland flooding due to storm surge and precipitation. The risks associated with living in the coastal zone are expected to increase over the next century in response to changing climate and the concomitant sea level rise.

A group of coastal oceanographers, geologists, and engineers have formed to initiate studies on the North Carolina coast, using high-resolution (finite element) storm surge and waves models, long-term shoreline modeling techniques, and regional implementations of the WRF model. We plan to further downscale regional climate model results to the southeast US coast, at sufficient resolution to support tropical cyclone development and evolution. We will need output from the regional future climate simulations provided through NARCCAP to drive our sub-regional modeling system, and also to establish the current climate response to the North Carolina region.

Our primary research goals over the next several years are to understand North Carolina's changing risk given prescription of future climates, and particularly in terms of changes in wind, wave, and storm surge extremes, frequency and intensity of tropical and extratropical systems, and coastal vulnerability. We plan on developing data sets that describe these coastal hazards and their evolution under future climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Max Bleiweiss

email: mbleiwei@taipan.nmsu.edu


Research
Climate change assessments for the southern rocky mountains and us mexico border region.

We have been conducting field and greenhouse research since 1988. Research has included field evaluations of candidate herbicides for use in chile pepper, onion, cotton, grain sorghum, corn, and pecans; determination of the economic benefit of herbicides and cultivation for weed management in chile pepper; effect of weeds on yield and quality of chile pepper; and growth characteristics of some of the problem weeds found in southern New Mexico production systems. The research has defined the problems that weeds pose in production agriculture in New Mexico and has provided information concerning the effectiveness of herbicides in our soils and under our environmental conditions. Annual reports from 1988 through 2009 have been scanned and posted on the EPWS website.

 
 
 

David Blodgett

email: dblodgett@usgs.gov
website: http://cida.usgs.gov/

Dave is the point of contact for climate change modelers needing access to NARCCAP within the USGS. He is responsible for requirements and use case development for development of tool in development at the USGS Center for Integrated Data Analytics (CIDA) at the Wisconsin Water Science Center in Middleton, WI.


Research

Various projects will be accessing data via tools being developed at CIDA. This summary will be updated as they become available.

 
 
 

Klaus Blümel

email: Klaus.Bluemel@agrar.hu-berlin.de
website: http://www.agrar.hu-berlin.de/agrarmet

Humboldt-University of Berlin
Faculty of Agriculture and Horticulture
Division of Agronomy and Crop Production
Professorship of Agricultural Climatology
Albrecht-Thaer Weg 5
D-14195 Berlin

Phone: ++49 (30) 3147 1222 / Fax: ++49 (30) 3147 1211


Research

Influence of climate change on apple trees; phenology, SVAT-modelling

The overall objective of the project CHARIKO is to investigate the possible regional impacts of climate change on fruit-growing in Germany, especially in the province Hessen. The main fruit growing regions in Germany are likely to be impacted differently by climate change and therefore these regions will be vulnerable to the impact of climate change in a varying degree. The CHARIKO project intends to develop application- relevant strategies for adaptation and evaluate the impact of these adaptation measures on the sectors profitability and productivity. In this context, different levels of adaptation will be considered. This project should help to maintain the competitiveness and profitability of fruit growing in Germany. In this way, the project contributes to the sustainable development of this economic sector. This is seen as relevant for the impact of fruit growing on land-use, as well as a guarantee to keep employment and a stable income level in this economic sector.

Earlier research has shown that the first impact of climate change on certain fruit species can already be observed. For example, since the end of the 1980's the blossoming of fruit trees in Germany has advanced by several days. The general growing season in Europe and Germany has been extended by 10 days during the last decades. Because of the earlier blossoming of trees, in some regions of Europe the risk of late frost damages has increased. Likewise, the number of pest populations in orchards has risen, e.g. the occurrence of the codling moth.

To assess the future damages on fruit-growing caused by climate change we will use some SVAT-, fruit growing- and phenological models. These models will be feeded with input data from different RCM-scenario runs.

 
 
 

Ethan Bodnaruk

email: ebodnaruk@gmail.com


Research
I will be using NARCCAP weather data combined with tree cover data in conjunction with iTree Hyrdo to compare future water balance scenarios with the current scenarios.

 
 
 

Leon Boegman

email: leon.boegman@civil.queensu.ca
website: http://www.civil.queensu.ca/Research/Hydrotechnical/Leon-Boegman/

I'm a professor in civil engineering at Queen's. I conduct research on physical processes and water quality in lakes.


Research

I have a project to drive a Lake Winnipeg hydrodynamics and eutrophication model with output from the CRCM to investigate the impacts of climate change on lake water quality. This is in collaboration with Ram Yerubandi at Environment Canada [Burlington]. I need access to daily or sub daily wind speed and direction, solar radiation (short and long wave), relative humidity, precipitation and air temperature data. This will be used to drive the lake model.

 
 
 

Celine Bonfils

email: bonfils2@llnl.gov

I work at PCMDI (LLNL) with Ben Santer, Tom Phillips and Dean Williams. The heart of my research is the investigation of the nature and causes of regional climate change using global climate models simulations and observational records. My research interests include the evaluation of climate model performance, the detection of anthropogenic influence on temperature changes in western United States, the role of expanding irrigated lands on regional climate, the examination of the nature and definition of low-frequency climate modes of variability, and the mechanisms that can trigger abrupt climate changes in the future.


Research

I am interested in the mechanisms that can trigger future abrupt climate change. In particular, I am studying mega-droughts in the southwest of North America, with an emphasis on the role of subsurface. For this project, I need to find first drought-conducive sea surface temperatures. These SSTs will be used to forced the CCSM3 model to provide lateral boundary condition to the regional model WRF. I will be using CCSM3.0 control run, 20c3m run and the A1b simulations performed with T42 CCSM3.0. Some of these data are dedicated to NARCCAP members. This study should help us to understand what are the mechanisms that can increase the likelihood of mega-drought occurrence in the Southwest.

 
 
 

Marcus Borengasser

email: mborengasser@eqm.com

Senior Image Analyst
Environmental Quality Management
2772 Harbor City Blvd.
Melbourne, FL 32935
(321) 242-6336


Research

We have been awarded a Phase I STTR by the Army Research Office/Corp of Engineers. The goal of the project is to develop an analytical method to evaluate and track the impact of climate change on pollutants generated by DoD operations. The resulting analytical tool will help decision makers determine the effects of potential climate change on the fate and transport of toxic compounds in the environment. This tool would help identify the causal patterns and the interventions that could mitigate the effects of climate change factors on contaminant fate and transport. The analytical tool would be hosted by a geographic information system containing layered information on the specific source and environmental conditions at priority military installations around the world. We hope to use NARCCAP data for the climate change portion of the project.

 
 
 

Jared Bowden

email: bowden.jared@epa.gov

PhD. Atmospheric Science; North Carolina State University

Worked with Fred Semazzi performing dynamical downscaling over the Greater Horn of Africa. Currently NRC Postdoc at the EPA helping to serve as a source for climate related issues and perform regional climate model simulations.

109 T.W. Alexander Drive
National Exposure Research Laboratory, E243-01
Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
phone: 919-541-5258


Research

This data will help to provide a means of determining the uncertainty for our downscaled climate change simulations. Also, the data will help to characterize the risk for certain impacts, such as air quality.

 
 
 

Sinue Bravo

email: Ing.Benjamin.Bravo@hotmail.com

Sinue Benjamin Bravo Ramirez

Research
Research of Climate changes from the area of North America, specifically Mexico, applied into a model to future predictions, amount of rain in large periods of time and regions in which is little rain or is much.

 
 
 

Shane Brennan

email: sbren006@odu.edu

Student obtaining a Bachelor's of Computer Science at Old Dominion University and a Master's of Science in Modeling and Simulation from Old Dominion University. My research interests include computer simulation related to water resources, serious gaming, and visualization.

Research
I aim to utilize NARCCAP data to create models to predict effects of global climate change on local areas.

 
 
 

Justin Briggs

email: justin.briggs@noaa.gov

I'm a Berkeley physics grad working at NOAA.


Research

Main Research Goals: Optimize our ability to predict flows in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). Evaluate the theoretical basis for the bias correction methodology currently in use by the Bureau of Reclamation.

Research Plan and Methods: We wish to use the NARCCAP data set to run a simulation process parallel to that done by the Bureau of Reclamation to predict flows in the UCRB. This entails spatial interpolation, bias correction (using the same method as Reclamation), spatial and temporal disaggregation, and the VIC hydrology model. The resulting simulated flows will be compared to those produced by Reclamation using the same simulation process, but different inputs (Reclamation uses each WCRP CMIP3 climate projection for the GCM inputs).

What Data Are Needed: Daily average temperature and precipitation in a spatial domain covering the UCRB and extending eastward to cover the headwaters of the South Platte and Arkansas Rivers.

Anticipated Findings/Significance of Work: We hope to uncover the source of the discrepancy between the flows simulated by Reclamation and the observed flows (in the UCRB). Perhaps the problem is the input data set, in which case our implementation of the NARCCAP data should be enlightening. Optimizing flow prediction accuracy will allow for better water management in the UCRB. Further, we wish to evaluate analytically the statistical basis for the quantile mapping bias correction methodology, thus illuminating a widely used procedure.

 
 
 

David Bronaugh

email: bronaugh@uvic.ca
website: http://www.pacificclimate.org

I do data analysis, acquisition, management, and programming for the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium.


Research

PCIC is interested in regional analysis of impacts and is interested in using RCM results for illustrative purposes as well as using the results to drive further statistical downscaling or hydrological and other impacts models.

 
 
 

Daniel Brown

email: danbro@umich.edu
website: http://glisa.msu.edu


Research

Climate research and extension for the Great Lakes region through the NOAA RISA program's Great Lakes center, GLISA.

 
 
 

Zachary Brown

email: zachary.t.brown@uconn.edu


Research

Doing research for the University of Connecticut in order to find trends between climate change and agricultural production. Will be using monthly temperature averages, maximums, and minimums. Will also be using monthly precipitation totals and rates. Also will be using daily average temperature and monthly average temperature.

 
 
 

Nathaniel Brunsell

email: brunsell@ku.edu

Dept. of Geography
University of Kansas

Interests: surface-atmosphere feedbacks, extreme events, ecological consequences of regional climate change.


Research

This research is centered on extreme events and surface-atmosphere feedbacks involving soil moisture, latent heat and precipitation processes.

We will be using NARCCAP data to pursue a number of research projects. First, we will be utilizing wavelets and information theory metrics as a new method for assessing the spatial and temporal dynamics associated with extreme values of temperature, precipitation and winds. These metrics will be compared with the metrics calculated from station observations as a way of assessing the ability of regional models to capture the spatial structure and temporal trends of extreme events.

In addition, we wish to pursue a detailed study of the temporal and spatial scales associated with surface fields (soil moisture, surface temperature, turbulent fluxes) and precipitation feedbacks. We will investigate the use of the information theory metrics as we have done previously with remotely sensed observations and regional climate model output. In addition, we will investigate the ability of maximum entropy production as a possible way to assess these feedbacks from a thermodynamic framework.

 
 
 

Andrew Buddenberg

email: andrew.buddenberg@noaa.gov
website: http://www.cicsnc.org

I am a software engineer working for the US National Climate Assessment Technical Support Unit.

Research
The NOAA Technical Support Unit (TSU) is preparing for regional climate documents for the 2013 National Climate Assessment (NCA) report. The primary purpose of the regional documents is to provide physical climate information for potential use by authors of the 2013 NCA report. One of the sections in the regional documents summarizes climate model simulations for scenarios of the future path of greenhouse gas emissions. These projections incorporate analyses from multiple sources, including the CMIP3 simulations and downscaled datasets. The NARCCAP data have been used as the dynamically downscaled dataset. The motivation for use of NARCCAP data is its relatively high resolution. We plan to conduct further analysis using additional NARCCAP data (i.e., monthly and daily precipitation and surface temperature) for climate extremes projection.

 
 
 

Marcus Buker

email: ml-buker@wiu.edu


Research
Using the data as an example of netcdf importing into GIS in a class.

 
 
 

Sandy Burden

email: sburden@uow.edu.au
website: http://niasra.uow.edu.au/cei/index.html

Post Doc at the University of Wollongong, Australia in the Centre for Environmental Informatics (CEI) which is part of the National Institute of Applied Statistics Research Australia (NIASRA).


Research

I plan to use NARCCAP temperature data to investigate methods for predicting the location and extent of extreme temperature events. Spatio-temporal statistical models utilising a Bayesian hierarchical framework will be used to develop and improve prediction in relation to these events. The methodology will be assessed and compared with established prediction techniques using outputs from the different GCM-RCM. The findings from this research will improve the identification of areas which may be impacted by extreme events.

 
 
 

Emily Berndt

email: eisenaeb@slu.edu

Currently I am a meteorology professor at Saint Louis University. My research interests include studying the conveyor belt structure of mid-latitude cyclones and heavy banded snow events. I am interested in investigating how future climate impacts storm structure and precipitation patterns. I teach an introduction to meteorology class as well as a climate system class.

Research
My main research goal is to study the conveyor belt structure of mid-latitude cyclones and the resulting heavy precipitation that develops inconjuction with the structure. Previously, coarser resolution climate models did not provide adequate resolution to investigate mesoscale structures such as the conveyor belts. I plan to use the higher resolution NARCCAP data to investigate how different climate change scenarios impact the conveyor belt structure. Investigation of the impact of future climate on storm structure can lead to a better understanding of extreme weather events on a regional scale.

I work with Timothy Eichler also of Saint Louis University. His research focuses on how climate change impacts storm track, intensity, and variability. He will use the NARCCAP data identify the most intense mid-latitude cyclones in current and future climate scenarios utilizing a storm track program. I will further investigate the most intense mid-latitude cyclones by studying the storm-structure. I plan to use the NARCCAP data and GRADS to plot system-relative trajectories (ie conveyor belts) for current and future climates. Analysis will determine how the conveyor belt and attendant precipitation stuctures are altered in future climates.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Jamie Cajka

email: jcajka@rti.org

I am a GIS applications developer with 20 years of experience. My main interests are air pollution, water pollution, and climate change.

Research
The purpose of this task is to assess climate variables (mainly temperature, humidity and precipitation) as they are projected to be in the future. This is in support of a human migration model which will predict the numbers and locations of persons in the future, as the climate changes.

 
 
 

Peter Caldwell

email: caldwell19@llnl.gov

Since 9/07 I have been a postdoc at Lawrence Livermore National Lab where I am working on regional climate modeling over California with Dave Bader. Before that I got my Ph.D. in atmospheric science at the University of Washington under the tutelage of Chris Bretherton. During that time I focused on subtropical low clouds and their potential climate feedbacks. I have broad interests in climate change and climate feedbacks, and most of my research involves modeling and model validation.


Research

I am curious if the NCEP-forced NARCCAP simulations show consistent precipitation biases over California and if so, whether these biases stem from consistent errors in the character of their precipitation (ie exaggerated frequency or intensity). An informal literature review suggests that all models will show an overestimate of precipitation, though I'm not sure if the reason for this will be consistent among models.

 
 
 

Wendy Callendar

email: Wendy.Callendar@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Institute of Ocean Sciences
Sidney, BC, Canada


Research

We will be using NARCCAP data to generate forcing, initial and boundary conditions for a ROMS model on the British Columbia coast. This model will be used to look at changes in the strength, structure and seasonal timing of coastal currents in this region under future climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Elliott Campbell

email: ecampbell3@ucmerced.edu
website: http://faculty.ucmerced.edu/ecampbell3/index.html

Assistant Professor
School of Engineering & Sierra Nevada Research Institute
University of California, Merced


Research

Integrating NARCCAP data with soci-economic data (e.g. crop yields) to build statistical models for predicting climate impacts. The most immediate application will be exploring the relationship between the U.S. corn yield record and NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Alex Cannon

email: acannon@gmail.com
website: http://www.eos.ubc.ca/public/people/grad/A.Cannon.html

University of British Columbia - Climate Prediction Group
Meteorological Service of Canada - Pacific & Yukon Region
201-401 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6C 3S5
Tel (604) 664-9245, Fax (604) 664-9004


Research

My primary interest is in development of multisite, multivariate statistical downscaling algorithms, and dynamical-statistical downscaling is on the radar.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Cantet Philippe

email: philippe.cantet@meteo.fr

Research interests : climate change, precipitation, extreme events

Research
Compare outputs model (historical, projections) in small territories (especially islands in West Indies : Martinique and Guadeloupe).

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Bill Capehart

email: William.Capehart@sdsmt.edu


Research

We are working with WRF to explore the role of the land surface in regional weather and climate in the North American northern Great Plains. Specifically, we are looking at hydrologic (precipitation, streamflow, lake levels, soil moisture) and vegetation feedbacks between weather and climate. Our primary focus us the prairie wetland complexes NGP region, how they can be represented in regional climate simulations and their impacts and feedbacks as they move between dry climate phases (drought) to wet climate phases (deluges - especially as illustrated by those experienced in South and North Dakota through the mod-to-late 1990s). Our approaches range from modulation of soil moisture based on remotely-estimated wetland distributions, to the prospect of coupling them with landscape-scale models.

 
 
 

Greg Carbone

email: greg.carbone@sc.edu

Greg Carbone is Associate Professor of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. His research interests center on climate variability and change and impacts on agriculture and water resources. Some of his recent research papers on these topics have appeared in Agronomy Journal, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Climatic Change, Integrated Assessment, Journal of Climate, and Journal of the American Water Resources Association. He is a principal investigator for the Carolinas Integrated Science and Assessment group, part of the NOAA-RISA program. He holds a B.A. from Clark University, an M.A. from the University of Kansas, and a Ph. D from the University of Wisconsin.


Research

The Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments group is partnering with Dr. Larry Band at the University North Carolina to examine the impacts of climate variability and change on stream flow and water quality in the Carolinas. The project reflects our collective effort to understand the hydroclimatology of large watersheds in the Carolinas, and to develop related decision support tools for resource managers in these watersheds. The goals of this specific venture include: statistical evaluation of general circulation model (GCM) and regional climate model (RCM) output for the Carolinas, measurement of hydrologic model sensitivity to a suite of meteorological inputs, and comparison of output generated by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) models.

 
 
 

Bryan Carignan

email: bal24@wildcats.unh.edu

I am a Graduate Student at the University of New Hampshire. I would like to use NARCCAP to help with my thesis work.

Research
I would like to use the NARCCAP climate change results to help me investigate what might happen to snow hydrology (i.e. snow melt flooding, drought, etc.) in the future due to climate change.

 
 
 

Jim Carleton

email: carleton.jim@epa.gov

I'm the Modeling Team Leader in EPA's Office of Water, and also a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland. My interests in both these realms lie primarily in pollutant fate and transport modeling, and improving simulation methods for pollutants passing through natural or engineered bioenvironments (e.g. treatment wetlands).


Research

I'm interested in the possible use of NARCCAP data to drive watershed models that are used to make regulatory (water quality) and watershed-planning decisions. I'm especially interested in exploring the potential use of this data within the 'BASINS' Decision Support System, possibly in combination with the recently-developed Climate Assessment Tool ('CAT'), which allows modelers to modify historical weather files in order to explore potential consequences of different climate change scenarios on stream flow and pollutant export.

 
 
 

Christy Carlson

email: ccarlson@aer.com

Graduate Student, University of Nebraska - Lincoln
M.S.P.M, University of Oklahoma, 2004
BS, Meteorology/Climatology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2002

Currently employed by AER (Atmospheric and Environmental Research), working as contractor for the United States Air Force at the Air Force Weather Agency within the Specialized Models branch.


Research

Planning to study land-use changes and their effect upon the regional climate of the High Plains. Crop and irrigation, specifically. Plan to use several data sets covering a range of scenarios.

 
 
 

Erik Carlsten

email: ecarlste@gmail.com

I am a research assistant working for the Electrical/Computer Engineering and Physics Departments at Montana State University.

Research
Using WRF/chem to simulate transport of aerosols in the atmosphere based on LIDAR data collected.

 
 
 

Daniel Carmona

email: dan_c17@hotmail.com

My Master's thesis is to find any changes in the weather in the region of monsoon in Mexico.

Research
My work researchs the impacts of climate change on agriculture. I'm starting with the evaluation of precipitation over the Sierra Madre Occidental. I will be evaluating which model best displays the monsoon.

 
 
 

Carlos Carrillo

email: carloscc@email.arizona.edu
website: http://www.atmo.arizona.edu


Research
I am working in understanding the change of the climate mode forcing of the North America Monsoon summer rainfall under the influence of climate change. For that purpose we at the University of Arizona had downscalled two IPCC scenarios using the WRF model. The MPI and HadCM3 GCMs were used as a boundary conditions, and the selection of the scenarios was based on the finding by Dominguez et al. (2009).

However, two RCMs do not help to measure some degree of uncertaintly. Thus, we are intentested in reproducing our preliminary analysis to the simulations done with the NARCCAP project. I am mainly interested in precipitation from the RCM simulatios and large scale forcing from the GCM simulations.

 
 
 

Anna Catafau

email: anna.catafau@unitedwater.com

Engineer at United water

Research
Working on the potential impacts of climate change on water utilities. I want an access mostly to consult results of simulations for temperature and precipitation variations for different regions of the US. I'll also look at the variability between the different scenarios.

 
 
 

Ka Shing Chan

email: imkschan@ust.hk

I am a PhD student in statistics from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). My research interests are in Bayesian hierarchical modelling and max-stable processes with application to spatial and spatial-temporal data.


Research

I am currently working on a project in hierarchical max-stable spatial modelling and its application to precipitation data. Our objectives are in two-folded. First we want to study the Bayesian estimation procedure and sceond we want to study the changes in extreme precipitation while accounting for residual spatial dependence. We aim to improve the accuracy of some existing Bayesian inferential tools in quantifying the likelihood of extreme spatial events (such as precipitation risk).

 
 
 

Heejun Chang

email: changh@pdx.edu

Professor, Department of Geography Faculty Fellow, Institute for Sustainable Solutions Portland State University Tel: 503-725-3162 Email: changh@pdx.edu

Research
Our research group's main goal is to understand how climate variability and change will affect hydrology and water resources at multiple spatial and temporal scales. We use a combination of physically-based hydrologic models and statistics to understand the dynamics of hydrologic and water resources system. We plan to use NARCCAP data for climate change impact assessment in the Pacific Northwest watersheds. Our research results will provide useful information for making climate adaptation strategies in the water sector. More information can be found at http://www.web.pdx.edu/~changh/hydro_research.php

 
 
 

Howard Chang

email: howard.chang@emory.edu
website: http://www.sph.emory.edu/cms/departments_centers/bios/faculty/index.php?Network_ID=HHCHANG

I am an assistant professor in the department Biostatistics and Bioinformatics at Emory University. My primary research interest is in environmental epidemiology, particularly the development and application of statistical methods for analyzing complex spatio-temporal exposure and health data.

Research
NARCCAP data will be used in projects that quantify the health impacts of future climate change. Based on previous population-based studies on the adverse health effects of extreme temperature and air pollution, we will use NARCCAP data either directly or as predictors of future environmental exposures. These projections will be used to estimate the number of excess deaths and hospital admissions attributable future climate change, as well as the associated uncertainties.

 
 
 

Miao-Li Chang

email: changmiaoli@yahoo.com

I have over 20 years of experience in environmental modeling and water resource management. This includes 15 years in conducting research on complex environmental systems modeling and managed numerous water resource management/TMDL development projects in the private and public sectors. One of the issues throughout my career that has been intriguing me is how to improve ecosystem resilience in response to controllable (e.g. land use changes) and uncontrollable environmental factors (e.g. climate changes). It is imperative to understand climate changes and their impacts, and I am very interested to continue working on it.

Research
My research interests focus on using numerical tools on water resource management. My research goal is to understand how multiple stresses (i.e. physical, chemical and biological) interact to affect ecosystem responses. Natural stresses such as drought, salinity, climate change, and anthropogenic stresses such as toxic compounds, nutrients, and habitat destruction are cumulative impacts on ecosystems. The research topics I am interested in are to be able to use modeling tools to reduce the theoretical complexity of a multiple stressed ecosystem to a manageable level. These areas of research are important links between researchers, scientists, engineers and policy makers and managers. The basic research from many disciplines on data collection, data analysis and theories can be combined and linked with numerical models. The research from the biological, physical, and social sciences and modeling framework can also be brought together with policy makers and stakeholders to help us make informed decisions.

 
 
 

Tony Chang

email: tony.chang@msu.montana.edu
website: http://www.montana.edu/hansen/

I am currently a first year PhD student at Montana State University, working under Andrew Hansen in the Ecology department.

I received my M.S in Environmental Science and Policy at Northern Arizona University and a B.S in Mechanical Engineering at UCLA. My academic background and interests are firmly rooted in quantitative analysis and analytical methods. During my career in and out of academia, I have worked for a number of federal organizations including, the Forest Service, National Park Service, and USGS. I worked on a number of varying projects which allowed me to gain significant field expertise.

My focus and current interests are in landscape level changes in vegetation distribution given past, present, and future climatic conditions.


Research
Identification of vulnerable species and habitat are essential to developing strategies for managing and adapting to the environmental challenges posed by climatic warming. This project integrates NASA component models and data from the SERGom land use change model to hindcast and forecast responses of ecosystems and species to multiple future climate scenarios in the Rocky Mountains ecoregion of the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GNLCC) and the mountainous portion of the Appalachian LCC. National parks included in these regions are: Glacier, Yellowstone, and Rocky Mountain National Parks in the GNLCC and Delaware Water Gap NRA and Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks in the ALCC. Data being utilized in this project will include PRISM and DAYMET RCM and CMIP5 forecasts for all scenarios.

The objectives of this analysis are: 1. Quantify trends in ecological processes, ecosystem types, and dominant tree species from past to present, and under projected future climate and land use scenarios using NASA and other data and models across two Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs). 2. Assess the vulnerability of ecosystem types and dominant tree species to climate and land use change by quantifying exposure, sensitivity, adaptive capacity, and uncertainty in and around focal national parks within LCCs. 3. Evaluate management options for the more vulnerable ecosystem types and tree species within focal parks. 4. Design multi-scale management approaches for vulnerable ecosystem types and tree species to illustrate adaptation strategies under climate and land use change. 5. Facilitate transfer of data, methods, and models to federal agencies to facilitate broad application of the decision support tools.

It is expected that this project will provide a direct means for the National Park Service to incorporate NASA data and products into their adaptation strategy planning during the initial and formative years of the LCCs. More specifically, the project will: help to develop an operational framework for adaptation strategy planning; compile key data sets such as downscaled climate scenarios, land use, and time series of historic biodiversity data; use ecological forecasting tools to project past and potential future trends in key indictors; assess vulnerability of ecosystem processes, ecological systems, and tree species to climate and land use change; and demonstrate the development and implementation of management options for National Parks and protected areas centered ecosystems.

 
 
 

Soumyadeep Chatterjee

email: chat0129@umn.edu

I am a PhD candidate at the Dept. of Computer Sc. and Engg., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.


Research

I am a part of the NSF funded project Expeditions in Computing: Understanding Climate Change - A Data Driven Approach. As part of the project, we are trying to construct statistical predictive models for statistical downscaling of GCM model predictions. The NARCCAP data, being dynamically downscaled model outputs over the US and Canada, will be the baseline for comparison of statistical downscaling models using global GCM model outputs.

 
 
 

Somsubhra Chattopadhyay

email: som.agrotech@gmail.com

I am pursuing my graduate study at North Carolina A&T State University in the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. My research interests include hydroclimatology, water resources engineering, watershed modeling and water resources management.

Research
I wish to study the impacts of anticipated climate change on the water availability and water quality in a watershed here in North Carolina. Thus I plan to use NARCCAP as my primary source of obtaining future climate data.

 
 
 

Chiranjib Chaudhuri

email: chiranjibchaudhuri@gmail.com

I am PhD student in IIT Kanpur, India.

Research
I am working on the effect of climate change over India. I would like to use NARCCAP data as a model to set up datasets over India. I am looking to see what type of input WRF takes to study the future climate change (eg. the interpolated fields from CAM) so that I may be able to do the same for India also. I am particularly insterested in Impact of Climate change on the Hydrological cycle. NARCCAP data will be very useful for my research.

 
 
 

Heyin Chen

email: chenhy111@gmail.com

I am a master student of University of Cincinnati.

Research
My research project is mainly to examine the impacts of climate variability and change on stream flow and water quality in Las Vegas and to evaluate related water policies for water resource managers in this area.

 
 
 

Liang Chen

email: liang.chen@wku.edu

  • Currently a vistor at Western Kentucky University for 1 year
  • PHD in Meteorology, degree expected in July 2011, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science
  • 2004-2007 Master of Natural Geography, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • 2000-2004 Bachelor of Atmospheric Sciences, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Yunnan University

Research Interests:

  • Land surface process analysis and simulation
  • Regional climate simulations
  • Land surface-atmosphere interfaces and interactions using coupled regional climate models
  • The Effects of Urbanization on climate change


Research

Dynamically downscaling of the IPCC AR4 climate projections by the global scale NASA GISS Atmosphere-Ocean Model (AOM) and the continental scale simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to 10x10 km2 resolutions

 
 
 

Xi Chen

email: xichen0904@gmail.com

PhD student
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Engineering II, Room 110A
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816


Research

In this study, potential climate change impacts on runoff and sediment load are assessed based on Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a semi-distributed hydrologic model. The observed streamflow and sediment load from 1985 to 1994 are used for the model calibration. The rainfall data under the impact of climate change based on two regional climate models (RCMs) from North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), HRM3-HADCM3 and RCM3-GFDL, will be applied as the input of the calibrated SWAT model to estimate potential climate change impact on the streamflow and sediment loads.

 
 
 

Yongsheng Chen

email: yochen@yorku.ca

Assistant Professor Department of Earth and Space Science and Engineering York University Research interests: Data assimilation, Ensemble forecast, High impact weather, Regional climate

Research
My students and I will use NARCCAP data to evaluate the abilities of various models in reproducing temperature, precipitation, and winds prediction in the Ontario region. Model results from hindcast will be compared with available observations. The best model or an optimal combination of the models will be used to drive a regional climate model to produce high-resolution forecast under different climate change scenarios.

 
 
 

Tiffany Cheng

email: chengti@onid.orst.edu

I am currently a graduate research assistant working with PI David F. Hill in Oregon State University's Coastal and Ocean Engineering group. My research focuses on tidal circulation and wave modeling within Tillamook Bay, a major estuary along the Oregon coastline.


Research

Estuaries supply a number of complex ecological services to humans and wildlife. Climate change directly affects the equilibrium in which coastal ecosystems operate and provide value. Our goal is to assess the hydrodynamic response of an estuary system to climate change-driven impacts on three major boundary conditions: long-term sea level rise (SLR), meteorological forcing, and river/hydrological inputs. This study focuses on Tillamook Bay, an estuary located on the northern coast of Oregon. The results of this work will assist both state and federal agencies in coastal planning and decision making.

We apply an unstructured finite-element mesh, coupled ADCIRC-SWAN model to Tillamook Bay, to simulate tidal circulation and waves properly in the near shore environment. ADCIRC provides water surface elevations and depth-averaged velocity inputs to SWAN, while SWAN outputs wave action densities to force the former. The bathymetry that the unstructured mesh is based on is a blend of bathy/topo DEMS produced by the NOAA Tsunami Inundation project and the latest DOGAMI LIDAR data. The mesh is created from the localized truncation error analysis method, thus devoting more resolution to areas of complex bathymetry near the shoreline and within the estuary.

SLR estimates for the central OR coast range on the order of several centimeters to a meter, depending on time. In order to capture this temporal variability, three decade-long simulations, 2020-2030, 2040-2050, and 2090-2011, will be undertaken for our domain. The length of these runs resolves both seasonal variability in tidal signals and major climate regime shifts with periods of 2-7 years. For each decade, the hydrodynamic model will be forced with two scenarios: mean and worst-case. This approach allows for statistical analysis of resultant TWLs everywhere in the domain.

Meteorological data from NARCCAP will be used to force the model for future climate change scenarios. The same met data will be used to produce stream flow datasets relevant for each decade.

 
 
 

Will Cheng

email: chengw@ucar.edu

I work at RAL/NCAR.

Research
Estimate wind climate variability using NCARCCAP.

 
 
 

Allen Chhav

email: apc86@cornell.edu

Cornell student in Environmental Systems. I will be using NARCCAP data in research for assignments.

Research
Our current assignment entails predicting and comparing regional climate changes over the next 60 or more years.

 
 
 

Huicheng Chien

email: hchien@slu.edu

I am a physical geographer with expertise in hydrology, geomorphology, hydrological modeling, biogeography, and GIS. I am currently a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Biology and Center for Environmental Sciences at Saint Louis University.

Research
Working with members of the Aquatic Research Group I am attempting to predict the spatial variability of streamflow in Illinois and Alabama using a watershed hydrologic model incorporating current and future climate data. Subsequently, the simulated streamflow will be integrated with aquatic species distribution data to predict the spatial distribution of current and future hydrologic habitat for fishes and invertebrates.

 
 
 

Soyee Chiu

email: sc3245@columbia.edu


Research
The Climate Impacts Group at NASA GISS is interested in NARCCAP output for several potential applications:

Drive further downscaling with the WRF-ARW model to the metropolitan level
Directly drive impact assessment models (of agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and/or water resource management)
Examine the sensitivity of large-scale circulation patterns to climate scenarios
Determine the statistics of extreme events in participating models
Evaluate the ensemble and member statistics to determine whether NARCCAP-like projects are justified for climate impact assessments in other regions of the world.
Of primary initial interest is the downscaled 20th Century climate scenario, followed by the A2 scenarios in the mid 21st Century.

 
 
 

Janghwoan Choi

email: jchoi@deberry.com

Janghwoan Choi is a water resource engineer and GIS developer at Dewberry LLC in Fairfax, VA. He received his Ph.D degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Texas A&M University. He has experience with progressively increasing responsibilities in application development, offering technology services and full life cycle solutions in support of engineering and risk mapping projects. He is a Professional Engineer, a Certified Floodplain Manager and a Certified Geographic Information Systems Professional.


Research

We are contractors to FEMA and tasked to prepare a climate impact assessment study for the whole United States to reflect the current global climate model results. Previous climate impact study used IPCC AR4 results and summarized in a June 2013 report prepared by AECOM. Our objective is to use climate parameter projections for the year 2060 and develop regression equations that relate peak flow discharges with watershed and climate parameters within a geographic area defined by HUC2 (21 HUC2 watersheds cover USA). We plan to calibrate the HUC2 specific regression equations using observed parameters for over 7,000 stream gage locations. The calibrated regression equations will be utilized to project discharge values for the year 2060. We are planning to compare the regression equation results with watershed projections, if we have resources. These projected discharges will be used to estimate increases in floodplains for national streams. These results will be used by FEMA to make policies regarding their insurance rates and potential modifications to consider for the agency. This work started in August and we need to complete by February 2014.

 
 
 

Kwok Chun

email: kpc715@mail.usask.ca
website: http://www.usask.ca/water/

As a post doc in Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, I look at different statistical approaches for climate change assessment using GCM or RCM outputs.

Research
I am interested in using N American regional climate change assessment program output for engineering assessments under climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Euiseok Chung

email: watervapor@naver.com

My name is Euiseok Chung working at the University of Miami. I am interested in assessing model output using in situ and satellite observations. euiseokchung@chol.com

Research
I am interested in assessing model output using in situ and satellite observations. Better spatial resolutions of regional climate models compared to general circulation models are expected to be advantageous to resolving the spatial variations of a given geophysical variable, in particular, over complex terrain. I would like to examine this aspect through comparisons between regional climate models and general circulation models and between models and available satellite observations for precipitation and humidity.

 
 
 

Alan Cimorelli

email: cimorelli.alan@epa.gov

I'm an atmospheric dispersion modeler who has been working at EPA Region 3, in that capacity, for close to 40 years. I am one of the developers of the AERMOD model - the present state-of-the-science regualtory air dispersion model required by EPA in most permitting situations. In the last 15 years I have expanded my interests into the fields of integrated multi-media modeling and decision analysis. I am the co-developer of a decision analysis approach (Multi-Criteria Integrated Resource Analysis (MIRA)) which is designed to examine complex issues involving multiple scientific disciplines, varied and diverse stakeholder perspectives and the need for trans-disciplinary learning (i.e., "wicked" problems / post-normal science).


Research

My colleagues and I are presently interested in researching the impact that climate change may have on an air quality, hydrology, and water quality integrated environmental system. To do this we would like to utilize the NARCCAP data as input to our integrated modeling system. Changes in certain meso-scale and PPL meteorological parameters, as described by the WRFG + CCSM / CGCM3 or a further nested version, represent, we believe, the best data available to examine our thesis question.

 
 
 

Adam Cinderich

email: cinderic@msu.edu
website: http://www.geo.msu.edu/

Department of Geography
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824


Research

The objectives of this research are two-fold. The first objective of this research is to perform a validation of the NARCCAP climate simulations using the gridded NARR data and some station observations. The second objective of this research is to assess potential impacts of climate change on corn and soybean production. The geographic focus for the research is the Great Lakes region.

To achieve the first objective, NARR data, along with climate data from surface and upper air stations, will be used to validate the NARCCAP regional climate simulations of the current climate for the Great Lakes region. The downloading of the archived NARR data is underway and with the submission of this proposal, it is hoped that access to the NARCCAP outputs will also become available to this project. Once the data are obtained, multiple variables from NARCCAP will be validated using NARR data and station observations to understand possible biases and errors in the NARCCAP current climate simulations. The climate variables to be validated will include not only the standard variables such as temperature and precipitation, but also derived variables such as drought indices and fire weather indices.

To achieve the second objective, this study will employ a hybrid downscaling approach to develop fine-scale climate change scenarios at the local level that incorporate regionally specific circulation. The approach will utilize empirical transfer functions, which will be developed by using the NARR data and observed climate variables (e.g., daily precipitation, daily maximum and minimum temperatures) at climate stations, to further downscale the NARCCAP simulations to the local scale to project a likely range of future climate conditions for specific locations within the Great Lakes region. These local climate change projections then will be used to estimate the likely impact of future climate change on corn and soybean yields and to assess the potential benefits of implementing a set of adaptation options for the two crops in the region.

This research has several important implications that can affect both future research and applied sciences alike. First, the validation of NARCCAP climate runs will help climate impact assessment work using NARCCAP. Knowing how the RCM performs in simulating current climate is necessary for understanding the potential limitations of RCMs in their predictions of future climate. Understanding the weakness of the RCMs will also help model developers to improve these tools. Future research projects, including those that wish to study climatology in an applied fashion such as agriculture and wind energy, may benefit from the outcomes of this project. Second, because climate change is expected to have substantial impacts on agriculture, the fine-scale climate scenarios developed in this study will benefit for improving regional assessments of climate change impacts on agricultural production. Third, as applied research on climate change adaptation is still lacking, the proposed assessment will provide invaluable information for agricultural management to develop appropriate climate change adaptation strategies.

 
 
 

Carol Clayson

email: cclayson@fsu.edu
website: http://casil.met.fsu.edu

Associate Professor, Department of Meteorology
Director, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4520

B.S., 1988, Brigham Young University, Physics and Astronomy;
M.S. (1990) and Ph.D. (1995) University of Colorado, Boulder (Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sci., Aerospace Engineering Sci.)


Research

I am interested in downloading climate and regional models for comparison to data to investigate atmospheric responses to seasonal AMOC variability. This is a proposal for exploratory research of the atmospheric response to a potential slow-down of the AMOC. We propose to explore two closely related aspects of this issue. One aspect is to determine whether observations support local atmospheric warming near regions of reduced ocean convection. Since there is no deep-water formation in the Atlantic during the summer, we will view the spring as a period of AMOC weakening and the fall as a period of AMOC strengthening. We will examine the extensive records of atmospheric temperatures from various European stations downstream of the convection sites, a much shorter time series of satellite-derived air temperatures over the ocean, and a long time series of SST.

Goals: This is an analysis in the area of longer-time scale coupled atmosphere-ocean scales of variability, particularly the Meridional Overturning Circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. An improved understanding of the air-sea heat exchange and resulting temperature differences throughout the upper ocean/lower atmosphere is a necessary component of understanding how the ocean may play a role in climate variability through the AMOC. Our work will provide both a better theoretical understanding of the issues at hand and also an analysis of the extent to which our current climate data records can help resolve these issues. It will furthermore provide some guidance to current climate models regarding AMOC issues.

Our work will supplement the efforts presently directed toward the understanding of climate change by:

  • Analyzing land atmospheric temperatures records downstream of the convection region to see whether there have been any significant changes associated with the idea of a reduced AMOC.
  • Analyzing SST within the convection regions and upstream of these regions to see whether there has been a trend in its variability during the last 50 years.
  • Analyzing satellite-derived air temperatures over the ocean areas to determine whether they are capable of retrieving similar signals.
  • Analyzing the impact of horizontal atmospheric diffusionthat associated with the region above (and downstream) the oceanic convectionon the distribution of atmospheric heat downstream of the convection site.
  • Developing a framework to theoretically analyze the role of freshwater fluxes in the heat exchange process associated with the AMOC. This includes the incorporation of moisture and water vapor into the SN and Nof et al. 2009 models.
  • Determining which mechanisms control the convection-induced heat exchange between the ocean and the air. This is a necessary step toward a complete view of the heat exchange, and will help improve the representation of convection in climate and numerical weather prediction models.
  • Comparing regional and climate models to determine how their results with respect to this issue based on resolution and parameterizations differ from each other and from the in situ and satellite observations.

Broad impact: The proposed research will enhance our societal ability to deal with global warming, as it will shed light on the anticipated climatic changes. It goes almost without saying that our understanding of the AMOC should also be useful in various political and economic areas outside geophysics. Global climate models are wonderful tools when one can confidently rely on what they predict. Here, we propose to focus on an important process whose present representation in these models is far from certainthe convective AMOC. We propose to test the analytically based hypothesis that the almost-uniform numerical prediction of cooling due is probably not exclusively due to an AMOC slow down. We suspect that it is perhaps due to high diffusivities, changes in storm tracks or changes in ice cover. Again, our focus is not to examine the numerical models but rather focus on a comparison of the analytics to the observational data. We will do so by focusing on the seasonal variability of AMOC involving a reduction in the AMOC during spring (with no AMOC in the summer) and an increase in the fall.

 
 
 

Ethan Coffel

email: ec2959@columbia.edu

I am a Ph.D student at Columbia University in the Earth and Environmental Science Department. I am working at NASA GISS and currently focusing on changes in extreme events in the US over the next century.


Research

I will use the NARCCAP data to investigate changes in the frequency and magnitude of extreme events over the next century in the continental US. This work will both contribute to basic climate science and assist in climate change adaptation planning.

 
 
 

Rory Coffey

email: rorypc4@vt.edu

Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech


Research

Investing the the impacts of climate change on the fate and transport of waterborne pathogens using watershed modeling techniques.

 
 
 

Rafael Coll Delgado

email: rafaelcolldelgado32@gmail.com
website: http://www.ufac.br

Rafael has a degree in Meteorology at the Federal University of Pelotas (2005) and Masters (2007) and Ph.D. (2010) from the Federal University of Viçosa. He was a DTI-CNPq researcher (Brazilian Network for Climate Change Research), where he worked with the group Atmosphere-Biosphere Interaction Federal University of Viçosa. Dr. Coll Delgado is currently conducting research in climate modeling, relating the changes in air temperature with deforestation and the increase in urban area, using spatial-temporal analysis of orbital sensors and weather stations. He has experience in Meteorology and Climatology, acting on the following topics: Remote Sensing, Geographic Information System and Climate Modeling.

Research
Tree of Knowledge: Exact and Earth Sciences, Physics, Climate Change in the Amazon; Sectors of application: Higher Education Weather Forecasting and Climate Exploration Forestry, Logging and Related Services

To study the spatial and temporal behavior of meteorological variables in the region. Make applications on solar energy and other conditions of the region.

To characterize the biosphere-atmosphere interaction, including the presence of pollution in the environment and its effects.

 
 
 

Kayla Conrad

email: kconrad1@iastate.edu

I am currently working towards an M.S. degree in Meteorology at Iowa State University under our surface water hydrologist, Dr. Kristie Franz. I graduated in May 2008 with a B.S. in Meteorology also from Iowa State. My current research is focused on climate change impacts on hydrologic processes in the upper Midwest.


Research

I am using the operational National Weather Service (NWS) rainfall-runoff hydrologic modeling system (SAC-SMA) to conduct historical and future climate change assessments for the upper Midwest. My study is mainly focused on watershed- and daily-scale assessment of hydrologic model simulations of snow water equivalent, frozen ground, soil moisture content, and streamflow. I am using archived temperature, precipitation, and streamflow data from the NWS to conduct historical model runs, and would like to use NARCCAP regional climate projections to estimate future changes in the hydrologic cycle. I would also like to use the NARCCAP reanalysis data to understand RCM bias and to conduct any necessary bias adjustment on the climate change projections.

 
 
 

Di Cook

email: dicook@iastate.edu

I am a Statistics Professor at Iowa State University.

Research
My research is in statistical graphics, plotting data, especially of multivariate data and using interactive graphics.

I work on developing visualization methods for multivariate, and also spatial and temporal data. I also have helped development software for data visualization, ggobi (http://www.ggobi.org), which has a direct connection with R (http://www.r-project.org) and previous versions that connected to ArcVis for geographic exploration. Visual methods are very useful for exploring data, and I have analyzed data on climate change in Central America, and the El Nino effect. I am looking for data that might provide good examples for visualization methods for research papers, but I am also very interested in climate change and analyzing climate data.

 
 
 

Dan Cooley

email: cooleyd@stat.colostate.edu

Assistant Professor in Statistics at Colorado State University since 2007. I worked with NCAR's Geophysical Statistics Project as both a graduate student and post-doc and continue to collaborate with GSP. My main area of research has been in developing statistical methodology for extreme values with a focus on spatial data and atmospheric applications.


Research

We intend to investigate downscaling methods for extreme values, and intend to focus, at least initially, on precipitation extremes. We aim to provide relationships between gridded RCM output and weather station data. We intend to first compare weather station data to NCEP-driven RCM output, and then aim to relate this to GCM-driven RCM output for both current conditions and future scenarios.

 
 
 

Adam Cornwell

email: acornwell@alumni.uwaterloo.ca

PhD University of Toronto
Assistant Professor, Lakehead University


Research

My goal in using the NARCCAP data is to produce a climatic change scenario for planning source water protection and water resource management. The data that I am immediately interested in pertains to the local region of Thunder Bay, Canada, and includes precipitation, evaporation, snow and ice cover fields. In addition to academic interest, the work will contribute to source water protection planning under Ontario provincial legislation.

 
 
 

James Correia

email: james.correia@pnl.gov


Research

I am a post doc at PNNL working on improving the WRF regional climate model. My main focus is on the warm season with emphasis on severe weather environments and precipitation production. I will be conducting studies which relate the frequency of occurrence of severe storms to state and derived variables from the model output.

The goal of this work to assess the current deficiencies in the model and use them to as a guide for uncertainty measures in assessing the impact of climate change on severe storm environment frequency. I will be further examining the model output for physical process studies which can help explain why the model is deficient and make recommendation as to what can be done to alleviate or fix some of these issues.

 
 
 

Paulin Coulibaly

email: couliba@mcmaster.ca

Associate Professor
Civil Engineering Department/School Geography & Earth Sciences
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 CANADA

Associate Editor of ASCE Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
Guest-Editor of Journal of Hydroinformatics

Research Interests: Hydro-climatic modeling; Hydrologic data assimilation; Uncertainty analysis; Application of data-driven methods in hydrology


Research

NARCCAP data will be used in a research project entitled: "Simulating future continuous flow regime in ungauged basins in Northern Ontario".

A regionalization model has been developed for simulating continuous flow in ungauged basins in Ontario. The next goal is to apply the model for generating future continuous flow under climate change scenarios. This involves using at least 3 RCMs data (daily precipitation and temperature) to produce ensemble flow series that may provide a better picture of future flow variability. The similated flow series will be used for peak and low flow frequency analysis and also for determining possible changes in environmental flow. This information is particularly needed in decision making for future water resources development in Northern Ontario.

 
 
 

Karen Cozzetto

email: kcozzetto@colorado.edu

Postdoc with Jason Neff's lab group in the Department of Geology at the University of Colorado, Boulder.


Research

MAIN RESEARCH GOAL: To conduct a drought vulnerability analysis for Bureau of Land Management lands in the Four Corners region under future climatic conditions.

RESEARCH METHOD: Will run projected NARCCAP climate data through a groundwater recharge model developed for semi-arid regions in the southwest. The hydrology model will take into account soil type, soil depth, and vegetation type in addition to varying climatic conditions.

NARCCAP-RELATED PART OF RESEARCH PLAN:

  1. Download NARCCAP data for historic time periods and evaluate how well the GCM-RCM combos did in reproducing climate regimes for the historic period.
  2. Download NARCCAP data for future time periods.
  3. Use NARCCAP data to determine future drought characteristics e.g. timing, duration, degree of water deficit for the various GCM-RCM combinations. Select some generic drought scenarios from the range of projections and run these through the hydrology model to determine areas of water stress for vegetation.
  4. May also run some of the NARCCAP data through the model directly as a time series.

DATA NEEDED: Maximum daily air temperature, minimum daily air temperature, 3-hourly precipitation. Will probably look at other variables as well.

ANTICIPATED FINDINGS OF WORK: Produce drought vulnerability maps for BLM land in the Four Corners region. The BLM may be able to use such maps to determine what types of seedlings/seed mixtures to use in certain areas, what types of grazing to allow, etc.

 
 
 

Chance Creelman

email: ccreelma@stfx.ca

Currently a masters student in the Earth Science Department at St. Francis Xavier University. Completed a BSc in Physics/Math and a BA in Economics, both with a focus on computational work.


Research

The Northern regions of North America hold vast reserves of soil organic matter (carbon), once protected from decomposition. Now, soil CO2 emissions in these high latitude areas are expected to accelerate due to rapidly changing conditions. The Northern region represents an important climate risk of international interest that should be monitored in a systematic long-term effort. While technology improvements will make this monitoring physically possible, it is critical that the conceptual framework for monitoring also be planned carefully. The monitoring network will need to make efficient use of funding to target high-risk areas, balance many possible emission predictions that vary spatially and temporally, allow for incremental network growth and take into account transportation costs and accessibility.

Using model forecasts and other spatial datasets, we are undertaking research to project the evolution of CO2 release risk over time. The overall risk at any point in space and time is related to various factors such as expected climate change, the distribution of carbon storage, and carbon sensitivity to temperature and moisture changes. For data analysis, we are using a new Decision Support risk management tool that we have developed, which determines optimal sampling densities and distributions according to these risk factors.

Our current project is to undertake a simulation for Canada only. Canada holds nearly one-half of the world's permafrost-region soil carbon, expects significant Northern climate change, and is also a convenient geopolitical entity where stable funding can be devoted to Long-Term Northern CO2 monitoring network initiatives.

It is anticipated that this work will help move some attention from counting carbon - to the next practical step of monitoring carbon. We also hope that this research will result in discussions that will lead to a Long-Term monitoring initiative. Although the analysis is for Canada only, we expect to publish this work in a high profile international (AGU or other) journal.

 
 
 

Jack Creilson

email: jack@geo.umass.edu

Climate System Research Center
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003


Research

Our interest in the NARCCAP data is to conduct phenological studies utilizing GCM/RCM simulations of climate over the next several decades to the end of the century. Some retrospective studies suggest that certain climate change indices display trends that are similar to the observed phenological records, specifically linking plant development with its basic climate drivers. Our goal is to analyze daily output of multiple GCM/RCM simulations of future climate to see how critical plant-related aspects of climate (i.e., temperature, freeze periods) are projected to change over time and space, focusing on North America for the 2010 to 2100 time period.

 
 
 

Michael Crimmins

email: crimmins@u.arizona.edu
website: http://cals.arizona.edu/climate/


Research
We intend to use NARCCAP data to develop climate change scenarios in support of adaptation planning for several projects across Southwest U.S. These projects will support natural resource managers and agricultural groups in Arizona and New Mexico. The downscaled data will be used to examine potential changes in climatological variables relevant to different sectors and used to guide the development of adaptation planning exercises.

 
 
 

Paul Cross

email: PCross@icfi.com

I am a Senior Associate with ICF International working in the Energy, Environment, and Transportation division.

Research

The research I am involved with is looking at the impacts of climate change scenarios on electricity energy demand. Specifically, the temperature sensitive portion, heating / cooling, both in the residential and commercial sectors over the 20 to 100 year horizon and the implications of climate change on energy use in those sectors. Other possible areas of interest are impacts on the electric grid, electric generating plant operation, and hydro electric plant operation.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Mekonnen Daba

email: dabanok@gmail.com

Mr. Mekonnen Daba holds a BSc degree from Arbaminch University, Ethiopia in Meteorology and Hydrology on 2009 and MSc student in climate change and Development from Arbaminch University since 2011, Mekonnen Daba has also participated in several international trainings and international conference in different countries.


Research

Throughout the world, climate change impact is the main concern for sustainability of water management and water use activities like agricultural production. Climate changes alter regional hydrologic conditions and results in a variety of impacts on water resource systems. Such hydrologic changes will affect almost every aspect of human well-being. The goal of this thesis is to assess the impact of climate change on the hydro climatology of Fincha Sub-basin located in upper Blue Nile Basin of Ethiopia. The GCM derived scenarios (HadCM3 A2a and B2a SRES emission scenarios) experiments were used for the climate projection. The statistical Downscaling Model (SDSM) was used to generate future possible local meteorological variables in the study area. The down-scaled data were then used as input to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to simulate the corresponding future stream flow in of Fincha Sub-basin located in upper Blue Nile Basin. A semi distributed hydrological model, SWAT was used to simulate future stream flow. Three benchmark periods simulated for this study were 2020s, 2050s and 2080s.

 
 
 

Anik Daigle

email: anik.daigle@ete.inrs.ca

I work as a research associate in the Environmental Hydrology Research Group of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), and teach physics in Cégep Garneau, in Québec City, Canada. I obtained a PhD in physics at Laval University in 2006.


Research

My research focuses on the characterization and modeling of water temperature and flow regimes of North American rivers. I would like to use NARCCAP data to characterize the thermal regimes of rivers on large and regional spatial scales. This characterization will allow me to test different methodologies for the planning of a river temperature monitoring network optimized for the Quebec territory, where no such network yet exists.

 
 
 

Ioannis Daliakopoulos

email: daliakopoulos@hydromech.gr


Research

Prof. I.K. Tsanis (Dept of Environmental Engineering at the Technical University of Crete on leave from McMaster University) in collaboration with Prof. P. Coulibaly (Dept of Civil Engineering at McMaster University) and Prof. D. Jacob (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology) are planning to conduct research on the effects of Climate Change in the greater area of the Great Lakes.

The research group (a) will assess the results of the Regional Model - Climate Model combinations available from NARCCAP over the area of interest (b) will apply the REMO Regional Climate model, developed at the Max Planck at 25 km grid scale, driven by NARCAAP meteorological parameters at the boundary values of the domain and (c) compare the results. Based on the success of this research we will proceed to downscaling of the data to a 10 km grid.

The goal of this research is to get higher resolution grid meteorological data for hydrological applications.

 
 
 

Chris Danforth

email: chris.danforth@uvm.edu

I'm an applied mathematician working to develop new methods for correcting model errors in ensemble based data assimilation.

Research
I'm looking at NARCCAP data as a source for statistical information on systematic model deficiencies.

 
 
 

Melinda Daniels

email: mdaniels@stroudcenter.org
website: http://www.stroudcenter.org/about/melindadaniels.shtm

Fluvial Geomorphology, Ecohydrology


Research

We are attempting to evaluate coupled effects of climate and land use change in the Christina River Basin, PA, USA. We will be using 50km resolution downscaled data to drive a watershed hydrology model with dynamic land cover.

 
 
 

Indrani Das

email: indrani@gi.alaska.edu

Post Doctoral Fellow
Snow Ice and Permafrost Group
Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks
903 Koyukuk Drive. P.O. Box No 757320
Alaska 99775-7320


Research

Study of the precipitation patterns using orographic precipitation model

Indrani Das, Craig Lingle, Chris Larsen, Regine Hock
Geophysical Institute
University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

Aim of the project: To obtain orographic precipitation patterns over a 1 km/1 km grid over the glaciers in Alaska using LT Model.

Description of the project: It is important to address the problem of the rate the glaciers are thinning and what is their contribution to the rise in sea level. Estimation of volume changes by laser altimeters provides a means to estimate the amount of glacial wastage by calculating its mass balance. Also the changing climate is changing the precipitation patterns over the globe. At places like Mt. Logan, the precipitation is actually increasing leading to a positive mass balance in those areas.

I am currently working as a Post Doctoral fellow using laser altimetry data to estimate volume changes for the glaciers in Alaska. I am also using a orographic precipitation model which will simulate the precipitation patterns over high elevations where we have no altimetry data and will help us better address the problem of extrapolation of volume changes to unmeasured areas.

My research will also help to understand the coupling of atmosphere and the glaciers, whether the changing climate is also increasing the amount of precipitation above certain elevations and how fast are the glaciers thinning. Whether climate influences have increased over large glaciers having high accumulation areas? Large volumes of altimeter data are available in our group, which I intend to use to study the volume changes of the glaciers and their contribution to rise in sea level.

For this I require the meteorological parameters like wind direction, speed, Specific Humidity, Temperature at the highest resolution available (0.5 degrees) from 1957 to the current date available.

Results expected: To develop a precipitation map over the entire state of Alaska from 1957 to the current available date and understand the climate effects at higher elevation where we have no altimeter data. It will help us to extrapolate our results to the highest elevations and give a more accurate estimation of the contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea level rise.

 
 
 

John David

email: ebo@sandien.com

I am currently completing a second masters in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Connecticut. In addition I am a Research Associate with the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, a volunteer scientist wit the US Geological Survey, and am associated with the Foundation for Ecological Restoration Monitoring and Assessment.


Research

I am working on a collaborative project with researchers at the National Wetlands Research Center to model the effects of global climate change on the baldcypress swamps in North America. Since temperature and drought in the southeastern portion of North America are predicted to become more extreme in the future by the IPCC, we are requesting data from the NARCCAP to better model the effects of these changes. In particular, we are interested in changes to temperature and drought frequency which are likely to affect the function of these wetlands.

Field observations within the baldcypress swamps are being used to develop models of production, survivorship, and regeneration for 10 dominate species within the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley. The overall behavior of these station-data parametrized models will be compared against model parametrization using NCEP-DOE Reanalysis II and Time Slices results. We further intend to investigate using NARCCAP configurations and the future IPCC scenarios to examine the range of variability of model predictions and likely survivorship.

 
 
 

Neil Davis

email: neild@email.unc.edu

Worked with Dr. Fred Semazzi on regional climate research for my masters at NCSU. After graduating I have been working at the Institute for the Environment at UNC Chapel Hill with a focus on air quality modeling.

Research

I plan on using the NARCCAP data to compare against climate simulations I am currently performing for use in air quality applications. Additionally we may look to downscale the NARCCAP simulations for future year air quality studies.

 
 
 

John Dawson

email: dawson.john@epa.gov


Research

I plan on using NARCCAP data in analyses of climate change on the environment in the US. Specifically, I will be focusing on the interactions between climate change and air quality. This includes the drivers of both outdoor and indoor air quality.

 
 
 

Jay Day

email: jay.day@riverside.com

Riverside Technology, inc. 2950 East Harmony Rd. - Suite 390 Fort Collins, CO 80528 970-484-7573

Research
Riverside?s research interests in climate change are focused on studying the potential impacts of climate change on water resources. Riverside is currently developing a Climate Change Decision Support System as part of a SBIR project for NOAA. The system provides tools to help water managers explore the range of current GCM climate projections and develop scenarios of climate-adjusted streamflow.

 
 
 

Stephan De Wekker

email: dewekker@virginia.edu
website: http://www.evsc.virginia.edu/~atmos/De_Wekker_Lab/Home.html

My research focuses on the investigation of atmospheric boundary layer processes in complex terrain using a combination of field studies, data analysis, and numerical modeling. I seek to apply my expertise to problems in the multi-disciplinary context such as found at the interface with ecology and hydrology.

Contact Information:

Stephan de Wekker, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
University of Virginia
Department of Environmental Sciences
291 McCormick Rd.
P.O. Box 400123
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4123 USA

Phone: 434-924-3324 (office) 434-823-2664 (home)
Fax: 434-982-2137


Research

Our major goal is to investigate feedbacks between land cover change and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics that may contribute to shrub encroachment in the southwestern US. Woody plant encroachment into grasslands is a global phenomenon that results from a variety of global change drivers. Over the last 150 years the southwestern United States has undergone dramatic changes in the composition and structure of vegetation due to the encroachment of woody vegetation. We are developing field and modeling activities to investigate and quantify the feedbacks between shrub encroachment and the consequent changes in surface energy balance in the southwestern US. Results from our field activities indicate a large change in minimum temperatures induced by shrub encroachment during the winter months.

We would like to use NARCCAP data to investigate the changes in minimum temperatures on a decadal time scale in the southwestern US and compare these changes with those induced by shrub encroachment. The results will contribute to understanding the potential feedbacks between land cover change, climate change,and microclimate.

 
 
 

Art DeGaetano

email: atd2@cornell.edu
website: http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu

I am a professor and associate chair of with the department of Earth and Atmospheric Science at Cornell University. I am also the director of the Northeast Regional Climate Center (NRCC). As a faculty member and NRCC director my research interests include the application of climate data to sector-specific decisions and changes and the observed land-based climate record.


Research

Increasingly the NRCC is being called upon to provide data, information and decision tools to stakeholders interested in assessing and/or mitigating their risk to climate change. These requests are far reaching involving water resources, agriculture, ecosystems and environmental issues. As an author of the Northeast Climate Assessment Report (NECIA) I have been increasing called upon to extend our results to different user specific concerns. I anticipating using these data to complement the downscaled climate data used in the NECIA. Currently we are interested in changes in rainfall extremes, snow pack characteristics and temperature data. We are working with several entomological models to assess changes in mosquito abundance as well as habitat expansion for invasive pests. We are also assessing changes in agricultural fungicide usage under climate change conditions.

 
 
 

Paul Delamater

email: pauldelamater@gmail.com

GIS Analyst, Forestry Department, Michigan State University


Research

Main research goals: To explore the relationships between climate, air quality, and human health data.

Research methods: We are utilizing a statistical modelling framework for modelling exposure, climate and health outcome data that integrates methods for point-level spatially misaligned data and change of support regression using Bayesian hierarchical spatial models.

What data are needed: Projected precipitation and temperature data for the conterminous United States.

Anticipated findings or significance of work: Identifying environmental and climate-related factors that are pronouncedly more detrimental will improve the understanding and decision making process of health researchers, policy makers and patients, thereby having far-reaching beneficial effects on the health care system and society.

 
 
 

Matthias Demuzere

email: matthias.demuzere@ees.kuleuven.be


Research

The main goal of our research within the CLIMAQS project is to find out whether spectral nudging improves the model results of quantities important for air quality and precipitation assessment. To find out, we would like to use existing model output data instead of performing a long-term run ourselves.

 
 
 

Ziwang Deng

email: Ziwang.Deng@gmail.com

I am a research scientist at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics of York University, working on a project about developing high-resolution probabilistic climate change projections of extreme events over Ontario from multiple global and regional climate models.


Research

I'm working on developing high-resolution probabilistic climate change projections of extreme events over Ontario from multiple global and regional climate models. I will apply empirical downscaling methods to produce probabilistic projections of extreme climate events (temperature and precipitation) over Ontario using large ensemble of RCM and GCM results. The project will focus on the improvement of confidence level on extreme projections. I will also quantify the uncertainties in the climate change extreme projections mainly asscociate with model imperfection and emission scenarios by producing probabilistic projections of extreme events using all of the available NARCCAP RCM and IPCC GCM results. These results would be of particular interest to adaptation practitioners.

 
 
 

Ankur Desai

email: desai@aos.wisc.edu
website: http://flux.aos.wisc.edu

I am associate professor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and faculty affiliate in the Nelson Institute Center for Climatic Research (CCR) and Center for Sustainability and Global Environment (SAGE). More information at my lab website.

Research

My primary interests are in ecosystem-atmosphere modeling and boundary-layer interactions. I am a PI of several Ameriflux eddy covariance flux towers where we make measurements of carbon dioxide, water, momentum, and energy exchange to better understand surface-atmosphere interactions and ecosystem carbon cycling. I am also developing data assimilation framework for ecosystem models with these data, specially with the Sipnet and Ecosystem Demography models. As part of that research, I seek to use NARCCAP data to provide meteorological boundary conditions for ecosystem modeling of carbon uptake in future climates and evaluation of RCM for use in forest meteorology.

 
 
 

Ramesh Dhungel

email: ramesh1dhungel@hotmail.com

University of Idaho

Research

I am working on my PhD on computation of evapotranspiration (ET) from remote sensing method. These remote sensing models are only able to produce a `snapshot' of the surface energy balance and thus relative ET once each 8 to 16 days at best. The relative ETrF can be interpolated or extrapolated over intervening time periods between satellite overpasses. One of the major `assumptions' in this interpolation of ETrF is that the ETrF from the satellite image date represents the conditions of the intervening time period(s). However, when precipitation occurs within a few days prior to the satellite overpass, evaporation from wet soil can elevate the ETrF values. Water balance model will also be used for tracking water. Atmospheric data and local meteorological data will be used for comparing the final results.

 
 
 

David Díaz

email: davidmz@atmosfera.unam.mx

I am a student of atmospheric sciences at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM). The main research goal of my thesis is evaluate the most probable future conditions of temperature and precipitation under climate change scenarios for Mexico, also determining characteristics of a statistical downscaling compared to dynamical.


Research

It is done a statistical downscaling to most of the participating models in the IPCC AR4 in the SRESA2, SRESA1B, SRESB1 and COMMITTED scenarios, although our interest is focus only in models simulating good enough the observed trend. The statistical downscaling was made by principal components regression using the CRU data base as a predictand field. It was used the XX century control run to calibrate the transfer functions in the period 1901-1970, and 1971-1999 as independent sample.

Comparing the NARCCAP output data of dynamical regional climate models with our data base we'll determine some of the main share features, advantages and disadvantages of a statistical downscaling against dynamical, besides the enormous advantage of cheap computational and human requirements. The main findings are that a statistical downscaling is good enough compared to dynamical to assess regional scenarios.

 
 
 

Yonas Dibike

email: Yonas.Dibike@ec.gc.ca
website: http://w-circ.uvic.ca/

Physical Scientist, Hydro-Climate Analysis & Impact Studies
Aquatic Ecosystems Impacts Research Division
Science and Technology Branch
Environment Canada

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Water & Climate Impact Research Centre
University of Victoria
PO Box 3060 STN CSC
Victoria, BC, V8W 3R4


Research

I am a researcher at the water & Climate Impact Research Centre (W-CIRC) at the University of Victoria in BC, Canada and I work with Prof. Terry Prowse who is the director of the institute. Our research at the W-CIRC focuses on hydrologic and ecological impacts of atmospheric change and variability. Specific examples of W-CIRC research include climate impacts on floods and droughts, groundwater systems, river and lake ice, forest hydrology, lake heat and energy budgets of lakes, alpine and reservoir water supplies, and aquatic ecology. Current W-CIRC research includes:

  • climate change impacts on cold regions hydro-ecology
  • climate impacts on river ice jams
  • climate impacts on peatland and permafrost hydrology
  • lake thermal responses to climate change
  • climate impacts on aquatic food webs
  • climate impacts on groundwater systems
  • hydro-climatology of western and northern water resources
  • climate impacts on ice-covered aquatic systems

In most cases, we would like to use simulation outputs from different RCMs driven by different GCMs and emission scenarios to simulate the range of possible hydrologic and ecological impacts and the uncertainties associated with them. Access to the NARCCAP data base will help us do our impact research more effectively and greatly enhance our ability to produce a comprehensive impact analysis for the various research project we are undertaking at our research centre.

 
 
 

Noah Diffenbaugh

email: diffenbaugh@stanford.edu
website: http://www.stanford.edu/people/diffenbaugh

Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Earth System Science
Center Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment
Stanford University


Research

The research will be part of the NSF-funded CAREER grant "Dynamics and Impacts of Fine-Scale Climate Change". The description of the project from the NSF webpage is:

"This project will test the hypothesis that fine-scale processes regulate the response of climate to elevated greenhouse forcing at the spatial and temporal scales that matter most for climate change impacts. In order to test this hypothesis, the investigators will establish an approach to climate change uncertainty quantification that uses a suite of impacts metrics as indicators of the magnitude and spatial heterogeneity of physical climate change. This approach will require a combination of existing and new climate model experiments; climate model configuration and testing; observational data analysis; and climate change impacts analysis. This over-arching hypothesis will be tested by systematically testing sub-hypotheses relating fine-scale climate processes to (1) the level of greenhouse forcing, (2) the response of large-scale climate processes, and (3) the internal climate system variability.

The investigators will produce a suite of high-resolution climate model experiments and impacts analyses. These experiments and analyses will contribute to a systematic, quantitative evaluation of the importance of fine-scale climate processes relative to other sources of climate change uncertainty, as well as a quantitative assessment of the potential impacts of elevated greenhouse gas concentrations on a suite of impacts indicators. Although this impacts-based approach will have the secondary benefit of generating climate change impacts assessments (including for severe heat, severe precipitation, and snowmelt), the primary benefit will be to better identify, understand and compare key physical processes that govern the response of the climate system to elevated greenhouse forcing.

The project will have a number of tangible broader impacts, including the design, development, and assessment of a framework for the Stanford University Learning About Climate Change web-resource. The investigators will also seek to broaden the participation of underrepresented groups through graduate student recruiting efforts. Further, the results of this project are likely to result in tangible benefits to society, particularly given the current need for improved scientific understanding and communication that inform local, state, national, and international climate policy."

 
 
 

Jenna Disch

email: jennakdisch@gmail.com


Research
To explore the potential use of regional climate model scenarios from the NARCCAP project and apply them to a hydrologic model for an impact assessment of the Grand River, Ontario, exploring both water quantity and water quality impacts.

 
 
 

Chris Dobbs

email: kansasman70@hotmail.com

I am a first year Ph.D. student at the University of Kansas.

Research
We are currently modeling coastal sea rise impacts in North Carolina to determine future terrestrial plant migration.

 
 
 

Venkata Dodla

email: venkata.b.dodla@jsums.edu

Dr. Venkata Bhaskar Rao Dodla
PDRA, TLGVRC
Jackson State University
Jackson, MS, 39204


Research

Our research aim is to study the impacts of climate change, associated with future global warming, on air quality over the central Gulf coast region. This work includes dynamical downscaling of climate data of the current and future climates.

We want to use NCEP global reanalysis fields for the current climate and NARCCAP simulation data for future climate change scenarios. We will produce the regional climate conditions and run an integrated mesoscale atmospheric- air quality models to study the air quality over the central Gulf coast region. We plan to use WRF-CHEM model version for this purpose.

The derived products will be used to study the impacts of climate change on air quality and health risk models using GIS will be prepared.

 
 
 

Francina Dominguez

email: francina@hwr.arizona.edu

I am a hydroclimatologist working on future climate change in the Western United States and how it will impact the hydrology of the region. I also have great interest in land-atmosphere interactions, particularly the contribution of local evapotranspiration to precipitation within a region. My affiliations are the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and the Department of Hydrology at the University of Arizona.


Research
As part of a DOE-funded project, we are conducting dynamical downscaling of the HadCM3 model using the regional climate model WRF for a continuous 112-year period at a 35km resolution. The domain is slightly smaller than NARCCAP encompassing the conterminous US and northern Mexico. As we analyze our model results we want to compare/contrast with NARCCAP results.Some of the specific aspects we are looking at are: extreme events, monsoonal precipitation, decadal variability.

 
 
 

Rosa Dominguez

email: rosae@rice.edu

Graduate student
Environmental Engineering
Rice University, Houston, TX (USA)


Research

I am evaluating long term impacts of bioenergy production on water resources in the conterminous US. Currently one liter of fuel ethanol might require some 500-4000 l of water at the crop production step, depending on what crop is used as fuel feedstock and what region is grown at. This relationship might change in the future since climate and CO2 affect both plant productivity and plant water use. The effects are non-linear and will be region-specific, hence a model that can simulate all these factors combinedly and take into account their spatial and temporal distribution is needed. I am using an agricultural model originally developed by USDA and adapted to GIS by EAWAG. The model includes the crop growth and hydrology modules necessary for this analysis but requires thorough calibration of numerous input parameters. This task is specifically hard when dealing with a distributed model as model uncertainty, specifically spatial uncertainty of input and validation data, can be high. The model has been thoroughly calibrated for the numerous input parameters to match recorded crop yields and spatial uncertainty has been reduced to a minimum. I am presently proceeding to simulate the fuel-water relationship with future climates as projected by the regional models from the NARCCAP database. Specifically I will be using temperature and precipitation data for the years 2041-2070. I anticipate the fuel-water relationship will increase in some places and decrease in some other. This study will show the magnitude of the change and whether the change is incremental or decremental and will identify the areas where fuels can potentially grow using less water and the areas where fuel crops will require more water to maintain current productivity. This research is relevant to bioenergy policy and water resources planning.

 
 
 

James Dryden

email: jdryden@okstate.edu

B.S. Meteorology University of Oklahoma 2008 M.S. Geography Oklahoma State University Expected Date of Graduation Fall 2010

Research

Researching the potential climate change impacts on wind resources in Oklahoma

The overall goal is to forecast changes in wind power density across Oklahoma in order to keep Oklahoma's wind industry as economically robust as possible as well as keep provide a look at possible future changes in wind resources as a result of anthropogenic climate change. I plan to do this by taking past wind climate observations from NCDC (and possibly similar resources) and choose a few GFDL, IPCC, NCAR, etc. GCM's for reanalysis runs as well as future runs containing CO2 emission scenarios. I most likely will take a statistical/empirical downscaling approach to increase model agreement and spatial resolution in order to capture mesoscale/microscale processes that often affect wind regimes. I will be using some statistical methods such as root-mean-square-error as well as other methods such as tree-structured regression to validate model accuracy and to downscale, respectively. I plan to compute changes in wind regimes and provide some potential percent decrease/increase in wind power density that would be of use/interest to people involved in the wind industry in Oklahoma such as investors, land owners, state energy department, etc.

 
 
 

Qingyun Duan

email: qduan@llnl.gov

Qingyun Duan, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Tel: 925-422-7704

Research interests: climate downscaling, uncertainty quantification, water resource impact studies


Research

I am interested in obtaining regional climate model outputs, particularly precipitation and temperature outputs, and use them as inputs to water resources models. Though I am not a climate modeler, I am interested in interpreting climate model outputs from multiple models and obtain an estimate of uncertainty from multimodel outputs.

Currently I am working on a project titled: "Enhancing California's water decision support system". This project, funded by UC DOE Lab Management Fees Research Program, intends to study the potential extremes for California water resources as a result of climate change. The main goal of the project is to investigate how water decision support system - CalSim model - operates under climate change scenarios. Toward this goal, we will need (a) downscaled climate projection for California, (b) information about uncertainties in the CalSim solutions, and (c) development of the water management solution with risk assessment associated with climate change.

 
 
 

Dave DuBois

email: dwdubois@nmsu.edu
website: http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/david-w-dubois.html

I am the New Mexico State Climatologist and CoCoRaHS State Coordinator located in the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at New Mexico State University. My research interests are in understanding the impacts of climate on air quality. I am the director of the New Mexico Climate Center where we archive climatatological data for the state. Our website is http://weather.nmsu.edu.

Research
My primary application of the NARCCAP database will be to look at future projections of air quality and health in the southwest US. Emphasis will be on the soil moisture, precipitation, storm tracks, and wind as we are interested in the frequency of extreme dust events in southern New Mexico and Arizona.

 
 
 

Guillaume Dueymes

email: guillaume.dueymes@gmail.com

Research Scientist at ESCER center - University of Quebec at Montreal ? Environment Canada (SMC division)

Research
My main focus is the study of some climate change impacts on Canada and in some other regions in the world.

- Develop and evaluate future high-resolution climate information on extremes from Regional Climate Model (RCM). Applying statistical downscaling methods from GCM to RCM resolutions and compare with RCM outputs (e.g, Automated Statistical Downscaling)

- Generate high-resolution probabilistic climate change scenarios including extremes and variability with assessments of their associated uncertainties (i.e. from GCM, GCM/RCM or GCM/SD cascades, and downscaling methods).

 
 
 

Lesley-Ann Dupigny-Giroux

email: ldupigny@uvm.edu

I am a hydroclimatologist working on issues of climate variability with a regional focus on the US and North American northeast region. My research involves quantifying land-surface interactions of hazards such as droughts and flooding.

Research
I would like to use NARCCAP data to explore processes and biases at a fine spatial resolution in New England.

 
 
 

Debbie Dupuis

email: debbie.dupuis@hec.ca
website: http://neumann.hec.ca/pages/debbie.dupuis/


Research
I would like to examine the data for the purposes of several different projects: projected energy use in the NE US, assessment of tools for extreme weather on extreme projections, etc.

 
 
 

Chase Dwelle

email: dwellem@umich.edu

PhD student in civil engineering at the University of Michigan.


Research

My research addresses whether the current generation of climate projections, combined with detailed mechanistic models of hydrologic and hydraulic processes, can yield information about the current state and future changes in erosion and sedimentation processes, and their impact on agricultural health with a high degree of certainty.

 
 
 

John Dykema

email: dykisma@deas.harvard.edu

Research Associate at Harvard University, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Member, CLARREO pre-phase A team
Member, GCOS Working Group on Atmospheric Reference Observations (WG-ARO)
Research interests: climate model assessment using satellite observations, Bayesian methods, climate change impacts


Research

Quantitative assessment of the impacts of climate change requires high-resolution regional information computed from ensembles of models that explore different well-founded representations of the physics and chemistry that govern climate. Although different methods exist for downscaling variables such as temperature and precipitation computed from global GCMs at spatial scales of 100-300 km, regional climate models provide an attractive alternative option. Of particular interest is the quantiative relationship between regional temperature and precipitation and agricultural productivity in the United States. NARCCAP data will be used to compute state-level changes in growing degree days and growing season total precipitation to investigate potential changes in agricultural productivity in the US in the 21st century with an ensemble-type approach.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Kyle Eckart

email: eckartk@uwindsor.ca


Research
My research will be focused on assessing impacts of climate change on watersheds around Windsor Ontario and examining possible adaptation strategies. I will likely be downscaling climate data, removing bias, and then using a hydrological model to determine impacts on watersheds.

 
 
 

Jacob Edman

email: jedman@uci.edu
website: http://www.ucchm.org


Research
I'm performing high-resolution hydrologic simulations of California, with an emphasis on water management systems. I will use downscaled climate data from NARCCAP to force these simulations. By performing these simulations, we hope to better understand how water availability in California will change in the coming century, as well as gain some insight into the resiliency of California's water management systems with respect to a changing climate

 
 
 

Timothy Eichler

email: teichler@slu.edu

I am a meteorology professor at Saint Louis University where my research focuses on investigating the role of mid-latitude cyclones in current and future climate. I teach classes in synoptic meteorology, intro to weather, and climate change.

Research
I intend to use the NCARCCAP data to generate cyclones in current and future climate. The climatology and interannual variability of storm intensity and frequency in the current climate will be developed and compared with other model and reanalysis storm track datasets we have developed in-house (e.g. NCEP, ERA40, AR4). Once complete, storms will be examined in the A2 scenario to determine the impacts of climate change. A special advantage of utilizing the NCARCCAP data is that given the high resolution relative to coarse-grid climate models, it will permit the investigation of storm structure (e.g. conveyor belts). Accomplishing this task will not only give perspective of how storm frequency and intensity will respond to climate change (something my students are investigating in the AR4 and the now-released AR5 models), but will also enable us to assess the structure of storms. This is important from 2 perspectives: 1) how well does model cyclone structure conform to observed storms and 2) how may storm structure change in response to global warming? Clearly, changes in structure could have large consequences on the regional impacts of storms.

 
 
 

Nellie Elguindi

email: nelguind@ictp.it


Research
We would like to use the NARCCAP data to assess climate change in the US by applying the Thornthwaite climate classification scheme. In general, our research methods involve creating climate classification maps for the present-day and future runs to determine how different climate types will evolve. We hope that results from this study will provide an integrated overview of climate change in the US.

For this study, my colleague, Andy Grundstein, at the Univ. Of Georgia and I would like to use the NARCCAP RCM data to assess how climate types in the US will evolve in the future period (2041-2070) compared to the present-day period (1971-2001). We will be using a modified Thornthwaite Climate Classification scheme that is described in

Feddema, J. 2005. A revised Thornthwaite-type global climate classification. Physical Geography 26:442-66.

We would like to compare our present-day results to the observed US climate types presented in,

Grundstein, A. (2008). Assessing climate change in the contiguous U.S. using a modified thorthwaite climate classification scheme. The Professional Geographer, v60.

Grundstein, A. (2009). Evalutation of climate change over the continental US using a moisture index. Climatic Change, 93, 103-115.

 
 
 

Nathan Elliott

email: nelliott@prbo.org

I am a GIS Technician at PRBO Conservation Science, a non-profit organization based in Petaluma, CA. PRBO conserves birds, other wildlife, and ecosystems through innovative scientific research and outreach.

Research
Title: Confronting uncertainty in species distribution projections--Increasing the applicability of an essential tool in climate change adaptation planning. Project Description: Actions to adapt existing conservation and management strategies to the reality of climate change require our best science-based understanding of potential impacts to species and ecosystems. Because conservation and management actions are largely place-based, projections of geographic range shifts induced by future climates have been central to ecological impacts assessments. Range shift modeling can provide forecasts of the rate, magnitude, spatial and temporal nature of climate impacts that can help assess species relative vulnerability, highlight current habitat either most resilient or most susceptible to change, inform land acquisition strategies and connectivity design, support placement and prioritization of monitoring efforts, and guide restoration and management objectives.

Such forecasts are generally produced by applying downscaled future climate surfaces derived from general circulation model outputs to bioclimatic modeling algorithms. Although hundreds of academic papers have published maps of the potential future distribution of conservation targets, the translation of models into management action has been compromised by the very large uncertainties associated with range shift modeling efforts. At every step, choices must be made about source and quality of locality data, species distribution modeling (SDM) approach, selection of environmental variables, which general circulation model outputs to use, parameterized by which greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, and downscaled to how fine a spatial resolution. Virtually every study chooses a different combination among these methodological alternatives. Estimates of uncertainty are rarely provided and almost never attributed to a particular source. Managers are understandably hesitant to use scarce time and resources for largely irreversible decisions to develop and implement adaptation plans, based on ecological forecasts with so much inherent uncertainty.

CAS & PRBO propose to directly address this critical gap between modeling results and management action. We have designed a comprehensive analysis of uncertainty in modeling species future distributions that can increase their meaningful contribution to climate change adaptation planning. Using a representative sample of both California breeding birds and endemic plants, we will explicitly partition among five alternative sources of variation in SDM projections of future distributions, and test for the significance of their contribution to overall model variation. The research outputs will 1) describe the range and degree of agreement among future bioclimatic scenarios for a representative sampling of CA endemic plants and land birds; 2) develop metrics of the degree of projected change across the bioclimatic requirements for 100 plant and bird species, and quantify the uncertainty in those projections; 3) identify the highest-certainty hotspots of climate refugia and climate flux for the target plant and bird species; 4) produce maps of priority areas for monitoring of projected climate impacts, and 5) disseminate all project results to the LCC Environmental Change Network, and summary data products among a range of relevant outlets. The broader results from our project will guide managers in their ability to rely on SDM results relevant to their management targets, will help users of SDM techniques understand the inputs required to build less uncertain models, and will increase confidence in the appropriate use of range shift modeling for climate adaptation planning.

 
 
 

Hugh Ellis

email: hugh.ellis@jhu.edu

Professor, Dept of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ.
Chairman, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins Univ.

Research
I am the PI of an ongoing EPA STAR project. I would like to obtain GCM output suitably transformed for use with MM5 (via regridder) to conduct regional air quality simulations for a variety of climate change scenarios.

Methodology for Assessing the Effects of Technological and Economic Changes on the Location, Timing, and Ambient Air Quality Impacts of Power Sector Emissions

The distribution of air pollutant emissions over space and time determines their ambient concentrations. Analyses of the impacts of alternative policy and climate scenarios must therefore be based on geographically and temporally disaggregated projections of pollutant sources. The purpose of the proposed work is to develop and demonstrate a methodology for creating geographically and temporally disaggregate emissions scenarios and the consequence of technological change for the electric power sector for use with the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). The focus is on power generation because: (1) it is responsible for most of the nation's SO2 emissions and point source NOx emissions; and (2) there are large uncertainties in demand growth, generation technologies, and generation locations.

The sensitivity of the amounts, locations, and timing of power sector emissions to economic and technological assumptions has two important implications. One is the need for a theoretically defensible, transparent, and practical methodology for determining future scenarios of emissions locations and timing. This framework will be provided by the use of a sequence of market-equilibrium models constrained by land use and emissions limits. First, the HAIKU model will be used to disaggregate national technology, demand, and emissions totals for a given scenario year (such as those that might result from IPCC scenarios) to regions. Second, finer scaled regional models will allocate specific generation facilities to the U.S. national grid comprised of 36x36 km cells, and will estimate their hourly emissions.

The second implication is the need to test the robustness of the emissions disaggregations to assumptions concerning load growth, technological change, and policies, such as emissions caps. We propose to systematically explore the sensitivity of both emissions and ambient air quality results to these uncertainty drivers mentioned above in order to assess which assumptions matter most. Ambient air quality for an example set of scenarios will be simulated using MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ. In addition to showing how robustness of ambient concentrations can be assessed, this will also demonstrate the practicality of integrating the source disaggregation methodology with the SMOKE emissions processing system and subsequently, the CMAQ transport and fate model itself.

 
 
 

Tegenu Engda

email: tegenu@gmail.com

Graduate Student at University of Wyoming, Hydrology and Water Resources Program


Research

I am working on modeling 1D vertical soil water flow and surface energy balance at selected sites across the state of Wyoming. I need NARCCAP 30 years historcial climatic data input to drive normal year conditions.

 
 
 

Robert Erhardt

email: erhardt@email.unc.edu


Research

I am working with Larry Band (Director, UNC Institute for the Environment, UNC-Chapel Hill) and my thesis advisor Richard Smith (Professor of Statistics, UNC Chapel Hill) on using regional climate models to predict distributions of future rainfall at point locations in North Carolina under different climate change scenarios. We will be working with NCEP and several regional climate models. I am currently pursuing a PhD in statistics at UNC-Chapel Hill.

 
 
 

Robert Erhardt

email: erhardrj@wfu.edu


Research
I use RCMs to study downscaling algorithms, and to study impacts of climate change on insurance markets.

 
 
 

Tyler Erickson

email: tyler.erickson@mtu.edu
website: http://people.mtri.org/tyler+erickson

Research scientist at the Michigan Tech Research Institute in Ann Arbor, Michigan. I work in the area of designing (award winning) web-accessible geospatial data systems that provide access to spatial and temporal environmental datasets and models. I primarily work with open-source geospatial software, and for this project we have proposed to release all the source code that we develop so that other research groups can extend the data system in the future.


Research

My research interests are in building web-based geospatial information systems for providing access to environmental datasets and models.

Ricky Rood, a climate researcher from the University of Michigan, and I have written a proposal to NOAA's Climate Program Office. The overall goal of the proposal is to create a geospatial web service that provides climate model datasets in a wide variety of GIS-friendly vector and raster dataformats (ESRI shapefiles, ASCII grids, GeoTIFF, KML/KMZ, WMS, WFS, etc.). The main issue we are addressing is that GIS user community typically does not work with NetCDF datafiles, and this has prevented many researchers from working with climate model forecasts. Although we will primarily be focusing on providing access to global-scale climate datasets contained in the PCMDI CMIP3 dataset archive, we would like to make the data system flexible enough to also be able to serve up regional-scale climate model datasets like NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Hyung Il Eum

email: hieum01@gmail.com

Organization: Environment Canada

Research
Main research goals: The aim of the research is to assess the impact of climate change on hydrologic regime in sand oil regions.
Research methods: An ensemble of RCM/AOGCM's simulations is used to simulate hydrologic reaction corresponding to the land-use change and climatic variability as well.
Research plan: We will apply the method to a small watershed as the first application, then it will be expanded to over oil sand regions such as the Athabasca River basin in Alberta.
What data are needed: 7 variables are needed to simulate; precipitation, temperature, pressure, specific humidity, wind speed, shortwave radiation, and long wave radiation.
Anticipated findings or significance of work: We can assess how water quantity will be changed, e.g. a range of monthly stream flow change, according to anthropogenic and natural variabilities.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Qin Fan

email: quf101@psu.edu

I'm a graduate student at Penn State University. My research filed is environmental economics with a particular interest in climate change impacts on residential location choice.

Research
My current research examines impacts of climate change on US households by linking a random utility model (RUM) of location choice with a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of regional economic activity. Linking these models enables feedbacks resulting from climate change-induced migration by simultaneously updating population measures in the CGE model while changing wage rates in the empirical RUM model. I am planning to use NARCCAP projection data on climate extremes (e.g. extreme temperatures, extreme precipitation) to simulate internal migration pattern under changes in climate and further to simulate regional economic impacts due to climate change-induced migration in terms macro-economic indicators.

 
 
 

Xingang Fan

email: xingang.fan@wku.edu

Assistant Professor
Dept. Geography & Geology
Western Kentucky University

Interested in climate modeling, climate impact study, numerical weather modeling


Research

To study the impact of climate change on regional ecosystem modeling. I plan to further downscale NARCCAP data (e.g., MM5I/CCSM) using the WRF model to provide input to an ecosystem model. The main goals are to investigate forest ecosystems under a changing climate.

 
 
 

Zuber Farooqui

email: ZFarooqui@eng.tamuk.edu


Research

Overview
Surface ozone is a secondary air pollutant known to cause extensive air quality problems. The South Texas region consists of a number of coastal and inland urban areas classified by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to be in near non-attainment status of the 8 hour ozone standard. These near non-attainment areas (NNA) have to demonstrate appropriate planning processes to continue to remain in attainment. This issue becomes even more crucial since the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has lowered the 8 hour ozone standard from current value of 85 ppb to 75 ppb which will result in widespread non-attainment problems in South Texas region. The USEPA has mandated the usage of certain sophisticated three-dimensional photochemical models for regulatory purposes. The modeling of dynamics of ozone processes is further complicated by the nonlinear nature of its formation. Advanced air quality modeling techniques are required to address this issue so that potential emission control strategies may be developed to combat the ozone problem.

There has been very little focus so far on the effect of climate variability on regional and urban ozone quality in the South Texas region. Rising temperatures due to climate change can substantially enhance ozone exceedances if the new standards are implemented. Emissions control policies in these parts are currently implemented by assuming the constancy of climate. The air quality modeling performed in this research study also addresses the significance of climate change on spatial and temporal responses in modeled peak surface 8 hour ozone concentrations and ozone exceedances due to potential temperature perturbations.

Overall the primary issues motivating the research study is to enhance the awareness of policy makers regarding the impact of climate change on surface 8 hr ozone concentrations so that future emission control policies for the South Texas region may be developed factoring the impact due to climate change.

Key knowledge gaps addressed by the project
Assess the impact of global climate change on surface ozone levels in South Texas region during the ozone episodes.

Scope of the work
It has illustrated the increasing importance of climate change towards regional air quality issues suggesting a comprehensive approach towards long-term emissions reduction strategies and climate change across different regions. The scope of the work includes the use of climate scenarios and emissions projected by Inter-government Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) into photochemical model to find the impact of future climate change to the surface ozone levels in south and central Texas. North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) has provided high resolution climate change scenarios and investigated uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate change. The output from the regional climate models (RCMs)/GCM nested over North America for the A2 SRES for current scenario (1/1/1968 - 12/31/2000) and a future scenario (1/1/2038 - 12/31/2070) is proposed to be utilized in the study. The present and projected future scenarios will be used in a regional scale photochemical model (CAMx) to simulate tropospheric ozone over south and central Texas.

Recent Accomplishments
Base case modeling simulations
The photochemical model CAMx was used in this study. The base case evaluation of the photochemical model simulations for both the high ozone episodes disclosed that the model simulated elevated ozone values was within the prescribed limit set by EPA. The model also captured well the diurnal variability of ozone observations. The ozone episode of 2002 had higher ozone values in Corpus Christi region in comparison to the 1999 ozone episode. This illustrates the importance of meteorology on ozone levels since the values of peak ozone concentrations were higher in 2002 despite increasing implementation of emissions controls imposed on emission sources since 1999.

Impact of perturbed temperatures
A modeling study was performed to identify the potential impact of temperature perturbations on tropospheric ozone concentrations in South and Central Texas. The temperatures were increased uniformly throughout the simulation domain and through the vertical layers by 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 °C in accordance to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report by Meehl et al. (2007). The results revealed that global temperature rise could significantly impact peak 8-hour ozone concentrations and 8-hour ozone exceedances especially in the urban regions of South and Central Texas. The maximum impact in both the cases is in the San Antonio urban region, Austin and in the counties north-east of Victoria close to Houston-Galveston area. The results disclose that climate interactions play an increasingly important role in local and regional air quality background concentrations. The issue of climate change becomes even more important in case of more stringent 8 -hr ozone standards. Hence, climate change should be considered in developing emissions control strategies and setting future ozone standards.

Broader perspectives of this research and benefit to the nation
The increasingly hemispheric nature of air quality problems (Akimoto 2003) linked with global processes brings forth the debate that future emission control strategies cannot be developed in isolation in a particular region. The strategies need to be developed conjunctively with other regions. In order to accomplish this it is important to accurately determine the ozone dynamics and the relative contribution of emissions from each region. The study has accomplished these objectives over the South and Central Texas regions. It has also emphatically illustrated the increasing importance of climate change towards regional air quality issues thereby suggesting a coordinated approach towards long-term emissions reduction strategies and climate change across different regions while dealing with both future air quality development and climate change.

In addition to climate change, land use changes and increasing anthropogenic emissions, which are products of expanding urbanization, will add to temperature amplifications (Civerolo et al. 2007). They will play an important role in determining the future air quality. The effects of increasing urbanization also needs to be factored in along with climate change to develop emission control strategies across different regions. The present study did not model the effects of increasing urbanization and focused on climate change alone. The modeling results presented here despite being limited by uncertainties provides a first insight on how to develop effective emission control stratgies in case of climatic perturbations over South and Central Texas. This modeling study can serve as a paradigm at the national level.

References

  1. Akimoto H. 2003. Global Air Quality and Pollution. Science 302, 5651:1716-1719.
  2. Civerolo, Kevin, C. Hogrefe, B. Lynn, J. Rosenthal, J. Y. Ku, W. Solecki, J. Cox, C. Small, C. Rosenzweig, R. Goldberg, K. Knowlton, and P. Kinney. 2007. Estimating effects of increased urbanization on surface meteorology and ozone concentrations in the New York City Metropolitan region. Atmospheric Environment, 41:1803-1818.
  3. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Scientific Basis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  4. Seaman N. L. and S.A. Michelson. 2000. Mesoscale structure of a high ozone episode during the 1995 NARSTO-Northeast study. Journal of Applied Meteorology., 39:384-398.

 
 
 

John Fasullo

email: fasullo@ucar.edu
website: http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cas/Staff/Fasullo/index.html

I'm a Project Scientist in the Climate Analysis Section and work iteratively with observations and CMIP simulations to better understand both.


Research

I'm trying to better understand climate change in North America as it relates to model resolution, the benefits of regional nesting, and their larger implications for global simulations. I have substantial experience with the CMIP3 archive and anticipate trying to evaluate the potential benefits achieved through regional nested models.

 
 
 

Balazs Fekete

email: bfekete@ccny.cuny.edu

I am senior research scientist at The City College of New York. I have almost two decades experience working on continental scale hydrological studies. I developed hydrological model components and corresponding GIS tools to carry out basin scale hydrological analyses.

Research
I am involved in a number of projects (funded by NSF, EPA and NASA) where we are looking at the affects of human activities on the water system. Our particular interest is how river flow, water temperature, and water quality changes due to engineering works (e.g. inter basin transfers, reservoir operations, consumptive water uptake) and various pollution sources (thermal loadings from power plants, point source contamination from sewage treatment plants, etc.). Our work looks at the changes in the past compared to the present and assesses the possible future responses to changing climate.

We are particularly interested in getting downscaled climate data (primarily air temperature and precipitation, but we are also interested in other variables such as wind speed, vapor pressure, solar radiation, etc.). We are interested in NARCCAP because it offers higher resolutions than global circulation models can provide.

 
 
 

Mark Feller

email: mrfeller@usgs.gov


Research
The LandCarbon program is a national assessment focusing on two interrelated objectives: 1) implementation of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, Section 712; and 2) improved understanding of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas fluxes in and out of ecosystems related to land use, using scientific capabilities from USGS and other organizations. The assessment covers all major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, is conducted for all fifty states, provides estimates of baseline as well as future potential carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes, and conducts analysis of effects of major natural and anthropogenic processes that impact ecosystem carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes. Major natural and anthropogenic processes include climate change, wildfire, land use change, and land management activities. The integrated assessment relies on existing data collected by various national inventory, monitoring, and remote sensing programs. The assessment uses an interdisciplinary approach, including remote sensing, land change studies, biogeochemical modeling, mapping of wildfires, wetland ecology, aquatic studies and hydrological modeling. The assessment is conducted at a regional scale: scenarios, model parameterization, analyses, uncertainty estimates, as well as progress tracking and reporting of assessment results are all conducted using EPA?s level II ecoregions.

 
 
 

Sam Fernald

email: fernald@nmsu.edu
website: http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/waterresearch/home.html

Alexander "Sam" Fernald
Watershed Management associate professor
New Mexico State University

Water quality hydrology, surface water groundwater interactions, traditional community hydrology, ecohydrology


Research

NM EPSCoR is simulating hydrology in mountain basins as part of the NSF funded project "Climate Change Impacts on New Mexico's Mountain Sources of Water"

NARCCAP data promise to be the most readily available and useful scenario data for our hydrologic modeling efforts.

 
 
 

Daniel Fernandez

email: daniel.fernandez@colorado.edu

I'm affiliated with the University of Colorado and I am interested in modeling carbon stock changes, fire, and species range changes, with climate change in lands administered by the San Juan Public Lands Center.


Research

Use high resolution climate chnages scenarios to model ecological changes in SW Colorado, specifically the area administered by the San Juan Public Lands Center.

  1. Compile and orient GCM forecasts over topography, vegetation cover, etc. to show regional impacts—essentially developing clear visuals for model projections.
  2. Analysis of historical simulations vs. actual climate for the targeted region. This is an important step for understanding the error associated with model forecasts and particular problem areas for simulations of SW Colorado. This analysis would be done for both the GFDL and CCSM output with the intent of evaluating which model provides more reliable output for the SW Colorado region.
  3. Analysis of future simulations and comparison of model outputs. Two components here: one aspect would be to evaluate model differences, and use this in conjunction with the historical climate analysis to develop a range of potential impact projections for the region.
  4. Prepare an overview of projections and uncertainties for local, state and federal staff. In part, the intent here would be to provide information on how the BLM/USFS can begin to take advantage of emerging national downscaling efforts.
  5. Preliminary impact analysis for priority BLM/USFS areas.

 
 
 

Joel Finnis

email: jfinnis@mun.ca


Research

NARCCAP data will be used for statistical downscaling and probabilistic forecasting of extreme weather events under enhanced greenhouse conditions. Work will focus on the Canadian province of Newfoundland & Labrador, and will contribute to the provincial government's climate adaptation activities. The response of precipitation and associated hazards to a warming climate is of particular interest. This is a joint project between Memorial University of Newfoundland, Natural Resources Canada, and the provincial Department of Environment & Conservation.

 
 
 

Steve Flanagan

email: sflanaga@umd.edu

PhD Student University of Maryland, College Park Department of Geographical Sciences

Research
Research examines how climate variability and plant characteristics affect forest ecosystem structure, dynamics and distribution in North America. I am performing a sensitivity analysis on how climate parameters like temperature, precipitation and radiation affect forest structure attributes such as height, biomass and plant functional type. At the same time I am working on adding plant migration capabilities to the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model. I plan on adding to the two areas of research together to examine how future climate projections influence ecosystem change and if the dispersal rate of specific plant functional types falls within the expected climate change rate. I would use the NARCCP data as climate inputs for the model.

 
 
 

Karl Fleming

email: karl_fleming@fws.gov

Biologist for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. I am located at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge. My responsibilities it to implement habitat restoration or enhancement on private property to benefit Service trust species.


Research

I work with private landowners in various parts of the the State of Utah to provide habitat for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust species. One of the program's focus areas is the Bear River Watershed and I am interested in projected climate changes so important habitat ares and changes in current habitat types can be identified for the future.

 
 
 

Chris Fletcher

email: chris.fletcher@utoronto.ca


Research

We will be using the NARCCAP data to investigate cryosphere-atmosphere interaction and surface albedo feedbacks under climate change. We aim to compare results with previous research using output from global coupled models, thus assessing the impact on these phenomena from model spatial resolution and/or the complexity of land-surface and vegetation models.

 
 
 

Patrick Foley

email: patrick.m.foley666@gmail.com

I am the chief of Hydraulics for the Corps of Engineers in St. Paul. I have been with the Corps 40 years. Other Corps staff will be involved.

Research
The Corps is doing a research study on potential climate change impacts on flooding of the Red River of the North. Our proposal is to enter NARCCAP and other available regionalized climate data into existing hydrologic models to evaluate how magnitude and timing of flooding at Fargo, ND, might change. All large historic floods have been a combination of snowmelt and precipitation and one goal is to see how the climate data performs for that type of flood.

 
 
 

Bill Forsee

email: bill.forsee@dri.edu

Desert Research Institute


Research

I am interested in climate change impacts upon precipitation processes and intensities at various temporal and spatial resolutions, extreme event frequency, and surface hydrology. I have worked/am working on projects to assess climate change impacts upon stormwater infrastructure design in the Las Vegas metropolitan area using a hydrologic model and to more broadly assess projected changes in extreme event frequency. In these projects, extreme value distributions are fit to sets of annual maximum series derived from NARCCAP data sets and other data sources. Preliminary findings thus far include substantial differences in extreme sub-daily (6-hour, 100-year storm) precipitation intensities from different NARCCAP data sets for grids encompassing the Las Vegas area. Further work includes expanding to locations outside of Las Vegas with a focus upon the arid Southwest.

 
 
 

Joshua French

email: joshua.french@ucdenver.edu

Assistant Professor at University of Colorado Denver. Interested in spatial statistics, with main application being environmental problems.

Research
I plan to utilize existing methodology (with planned future improvements) to confidently identify regions likely to experience "extreme" climate events, e.g., temperature increase of at least 3 degrees Celsius. Research goals include developing the methodology, applying the methodology to these data sets, and publishing the findings in peer-reviewed research journals. The methodology developed will have combinations of spatial, spatio-temporal, multivariate, and large-data components. Free, open-source software related to this research will be made available to the public.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Francis Gachari

email: regcm4@gmail.com

PhD Researcher at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology.
Member of RegCNET: a network of researchers using Regional Climate Model 3 (RegCM3), CETEMPS Hydrological Model (CHyM) as well as General Large Area Model for annual crops (GLAM).


Research

Research interests: Mechanisms responsible for severe hydrology droughts and floods in the Eastern Africa Region. Relationship between regional temperature, precipitation and agriculture and their relevance to regional food security, risk management and disaster preparedness. The factors that make the region vulnerable to drought and floods especially in the recent past.

Anticipated results: That there exists reliable time trends which can be used to predict extreme hydrology events in the region in terms of timing duration and physical location. Provide higher resolution simulations for specific areas in the region.

 
 
 

Phillipe Gachon

email: philippe.gachon@mail.mcgill.ca

Research Scientist – Adaptation and Impacts Research Division
Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada @ McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada

Affiliations

  • Adjunct Professor, Centre pour l'Étude et la Simulation du Climat à l'Échelle Régionale (ESCER), Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Québec at Montreal (UQAM), Montréal, Québec.
  • Invited Professor, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Eau-Terre-Environnement (INRS-ETE), University of Québec, Québec.
  • Associated member, Global Environmental and Climate Change Centre (GEC3) at McGill University (www.mcgill.ca/gec3).

Research

Current Research topic:

  • High resolution extreme climate scenarios & Statistical downscaling methods
  • Extremes analysis: temperature, precipitation, winds and hydrologic variables
  • Dynamical downcaling
  • Large/Mesoscale interactions under historical climate conditions

Main interests related to current project:

Funded project by the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council, (NSERC, Canada) in which both dynamical downscaling model (RCMs) and statistical downscaling tool (multisite) will be used to develop probabilistic assessment of regional changes in climate variability and extremes over Canada, in collaboration with ENSEMBLES European (RT2B/RT3 group) & US NARCCAP.

Team members (Canadian and partners) : Pr. VTV Nguyen (McGill), P. Gachon & X. Zhang (EC), Prs R. Laprise & C. Jones (UQAM), Prs TBMJ Ouarda & A. St-Hilaire (INRS-ÉTÉ), Pr. W. Hsieh (UBC), C. Goodess (CRU, UK), L. Mearns (NCAR, US), J. Christensen (DMI, Danemark) & G. Flato (CCCma, Canada).

Use of NARCCAP data and main objectives related to our current projects:

The main objectives and the current applications of RCMs simulations will be:

  1. To analyse and validate the RCMs with others models over Canada based on climate extremes (current period)
  2. To intercompare RCMs with the new generation of multisite statistical downscaling (SD) method developed in Canada and over regions in US in collaboration with NARCCAP;
  3. To develop new series of predictors at the regional scale using the RCMs outputs and analyze the added values compared to GCMs atmospheric variables used in SD methods;
  4. To discriminate the role of large versus regional scales influence in the occurrence, intensity and duration of extreme events over Canadian areas;
  5. To construct high resolution climate changes across various selected regions in Canada with ensembles runs and with uncertainties analysis;
  6. To evaluate and quantify the cascade of uncertainty from coarse scale (GCMs) to regional/local scale downscaling model (RCMs and SDs),
  7. To help to develop reliable daily time series under climate change conditions for their applications in water resources, agriculture, risk management, and various areas in environmental modeling.
 
 
 

Carlos Gaitan

email: cgaitan@eos.ubc.ca

Interests: Statistical Downscaling, Machine Learning, Extreme Events, Climate Indices

Research
I work under supervision of Prof. William Hsieh at the University of british Columbia. Our research involves the use of linear and nonlinear methods to statistically downscale coarse resolution data, into finer local scale.
We are affiliated to the NSERC-SRO project, and receive support from OURANOS through the DAI.

 
 
 

Thian Yew Gan

email: tgan@ualberta.ca

Thian Yew Gan is a professor of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada since 1993, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). His teaching and research have been in snow hydrology, remote sensing, hydrologic modeling, hydroclimatology, climate change, and water resources management and planning. Dr. Gan has supervised 30 graduate students and published a book, Global Cryosphere Past, Present and Future, through Cambridge University Press. He has also written over sixty refereed papers in various reputable international journals of (1) American Geophysical Union (AGU) such as Water Resources Research, Journal Geophysical Research-atmosphere; (2) American Meteorological Society (AMS) such as Journal of Climate, Journal Applied Meteorology, (3) Royal Meteorological Society (RMS) such as International Journal of Climatology, (4) Elsevier Science such as Advances in Water Resources and Journal of Hydrology, (5) ASCE such as Journal of Water Resources Management & Planning, Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, (6) Hydrologic Processes, International Journal of Remote Sensing, Remote Sensing of Environment and others. Thian has been an Erskine fellow of the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, a visiting professor to EPFL, Lausanne (2010), visiting scientist to Cemagraf, France (2009), a CIRES Visiting Fellow at University of Colorado-Boulder (2007, 2008); Guest University professor (W3) of Technical University of Munich (2006-2007); Adjunct professor of Utah State University (1998-2005); Honorary Professor of Xian University of Technology, China (since 2004); Honorary professor of Yangtze University (2010-2013), China; Visiting professor of Kyoto University and JSPS Fellow, Japan (1999-2000); Guest professor of Saga University, Japan (1999); and assistant professor of Asian Institute of Technology of Thailand (1989-1990).

Research
We perform necessary statistical analysis of the regional climate data for southern Alberta to obtain its regional IDF (Intensity-Duration-Frequency) curves which will then be applied to an urban hydrologic model, PCSWMM, to study the possible impacts of storms of various return periods, intensity and durations, on the stormwater infrastructure of southern Alberta.

 
 
 

Yang Gao

email: yang.gao@pnnl.gov

I am currently working as Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. I work on dynamical downscaling using regional climate model WRF, and investigate extreme climate weather events and its possible mechanisms.


Research

Working with Dr. Ruby Leung at PNNL, we try to evaluate the orographic effect over the mountain area, in particular during extreme precipitation, from a high resolution regional climate model WRF outputs. In order to explore the robustness of our finding from a single model WRF, we aim to use NARCCAP multiple ensemble model outputs to compare with our simulations.

 
 
 

Yanhong Gao

email: yanhong@hydro.washington.edu


Research

We are working on dynamic downscaling focus on the Colorado River Basin. Initially, we will implement the "standard" climate version of WRF, as used by collaborator Ruby Leung in NARCCAP simulations, and will perform tests to assure that model output for runs equivalent to NARCCAP Phase 1 (reanalysis boundary conditions) are consistent. We will then implement the WRF-VIC version, and will evaluate differences between the "standard" WRF version and WRF-VIC. We will also evaluate differences between WRF-VIC land surface simulations and off-line VIC simulations. Once these initial benchmark runs have been completed, we will implement WRF-VIC for the 20th Century GCM simulations.Our final task will be to evaluate the nature and implications of land surface feedbacks in recent drought years.

 
 
 

Gregg Garfin

email: gmgarfin@email.arizona.edu

Dr. Garfin is a co-investigator on the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) project. His CLIMAS work includes identifying climate services useful to assisting stakeholders mitigate, cope with, and adapt to climate-related risks. He is trained as a climatologist, dendroclimatologist, and geographer. His research interests include climate change, climate variability, and drought, and the effective delivery of climate science to decision makers. Much of his recent effort has been devoted to scientist-stakeholder processes that inform risk management and prepare for drought and adaptation to climate changes.

Dr. Garfin is a contributor to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program's Synthesis and Assessment Product 5.3. From 2003-2007, he served as co-chair of Arizona's drought monitoring technical committee. In 2004, he served as a member of the integrated team for the development of a National Integrated Drought Information System. He is also a climate science co-chair for the Arizona Water Institute.


Research

I am representating three projects with interests in using NARCCAP data: the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) project, the University of Arizona Institute for the Study of Planet Earth (ISPE), and a National Institute for Climate Change Research (NICCR) project on future vegetation changes in the Colorado Plateau. My CLIMAS and ISPE colleagues propose to use NARCCAP data in the following ways:

  1. To help stakeholders in the southwestern United States prepare for climate changes, in particular, water management and ecosystem management adaptation planning. As an example, we are working closely with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality on a climate change adaptation plan for the state, and NARCCAP output will undoubtedly assist in this process.
  2. We would like to present NARCCAP images, and perhaps data subsets, on our forthcoming climate change website. If feasible and permissible, we are interested in including NARCCAP output in a climate data explorer tool, which would allow users to peruse the data, in order to examine regions, parameters, and time periods of interest.
  3. In public presentations about projected climate changes for the Southwest.
  4. As inputs to research on potential climate change economic impacts to water resources, agriculture, tourism, and ranching. These projects are being conducted by CLIMAS colleagues Bonnie Colby and George Frisvold, as part of the CLIMAS 2007-2012 Phase III.

The NICCR project specifically requires fine spatial-scale data on projected temperature (minimum and maximum), precipitation, humidity, and evapotranspiration. These parameters will be input to a species-specific vegetation model, in order to project future changes in plant species range.

 
 
 

Leverett Garing Garing

email: llgaring@ncsu.edu

I am a graduate student studying atmospheric sciences at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Currently, I am enrolled in Dr. Fredrick Semazzi's class titled, "Climate Risk Analysis and Adaptation."


Research

The NARCCAP data will be used for a course project in Dr. Fredrick Semazzi's class. The course project will look at climate change impacts on the ski resorts in Boone, NC area. The variables of interest are wet bulb temperature and dry bulb temperature values for the Boone, NC area. Expect to find that the wet bulb temperatures and the dry bulb temperatures are increasing based on model projects; thus, meaning that the number of snow making days is decreasing.

 
 
 

Omar Gates

email: gateso@umich.edu

I am currently a Masters student at the University of Michigan. I am asking for permission to access this data for a class project I am starting for my research. This project is the starting point of my future research as well.


Research

The research question that is trying to be answer is as follows: Can current regional climate models be able to predict/resolve severe thunderstorm or tornado parameters well? The significance of this research is to gain a further understanding into whether current regional climate models can illustrate the specific parameters that are associated with severe convective systems. The use of the Weather Research Forecasting Model Table 5 data will be used to assess different parameters, such as wind shear, vorticity, and moist static energy, to figure if the model outputs are close to the reanalysis data available. Comparison of this data to other models will be the future hopes for the study as well.

 
 
 

Mahesh Gautam

email: mahesh.gautam@dri.edu


Research

I am a hydrologist/water resources engineer and work as a researcher at DRI and currently working on two projects on climate change impact assessments: the first one is to evaluate impact of climate change on flood frequency, and the other on drought and water management issues in the Southwest US.

 
 
 

Jason Geck

email: jgeck@alaskapacific.edu

PhD Student at University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Faculty member at Alaska Pacific University


Research

Looking at using RCM output within a mass balance model to evaluate Eklutna Glacier extent/volume and runoff variation. Unclear on RCM output to be used until compared to time overlap local met station data.

 
 
 

Victor Gensini

email: vgensini@uga.edu
website: http://vgensini.myweb.uga.edu


Research

I anticipate using NARCCAP data to try to simulate impacts of climate change on convective environments in the U.S. This will be accomplished by furthern downscaling using the WRF model. Additionally, we will be using NARCCAP data to follow up on Willis Shem's previous work.

 
 
 

Matei Georgescu

email: mateig@stanford.edu

Ph.D. Rutgers University, 2008
Postdoctoral Scholar Stanford University, 2008-Present


Research

My main focus is to evaluate the direct climate impact of U.S. biofuels via a regional climate modeling approach. The initial paper stemming from this project was recently published in GRL:

Georgescu, M., D. B. Lobell, and C. B. Field (2009), Potential impact of U.S. biofuels on regional climate, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L21806, doi: 10.1029/2009GL040477.

More recently, I have used the latest version of the WRF-ARW (version 3.1) to conduct seasonal, medium-resolution (32-km grid spacing) simulations to study the impact of land-use change associated with U.S. biofuels.

Via a simple parameterization of perennial grasses (e.g., switchgrass) my immediate focus - and for which I need NARCCAP data - is to compare the seasonal climate effect resulting from a substitution of annual crops with perennial crops (used as biofuels) with downscaled future climate scenarios courtesy of NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Eric Gilleland

email: ericg@ucar.edu
website: http://www.ral.ucar.edu/~ericg/

Research Applications Laboratory
National Center for Atmospheric Research


Research

My interest is in studying environments conducive to severe weather under a changing climate. Currently, I am looking at global reanalysis of a derivative of convective available potential energy (CAPE); specifically, Wmax=sqrt(2*CAPE); along with 0-6 km wind shear (shear). In particular, concurrently high values of these variables have been found to be associated with severe storms.

I intend to employ statistical extreme value analysis (EVA) to both the NARCCAP (and other model output) output to investigate how both the frequency and intensity of severe weather environments behave under different climate scenarios. I plan to use both block maxima and threshold excess EVA distributions to study the tail behavior of high values of the product of Wmax and shear, and to determine if these distributions change for future scenarios, and if so, what effect the changes have on the expected return periods for high values of this product.

 
 
 

Nathan Gillett

email: Nathan.Gillett@ec.gc.ca
website: http://www.cccma.ec.gc.ca/people/ngillett.shtml

CCCma, Environment Canada

Research

Attribution of regional climate change over North America using regional model output

Research questions:

  • Are regional models better than global climate models at:
    • Reproducing the mean state in temperature, precipitation.
    • Reproducing observed climate changes in temperature, precipitation?
  • Validate against monthly mean station data - climatology and trends.
  • Can RCM output be used in an attribution of North American temperature and/or precipitation changes? (having only an NCEP-forced run will present a challenge).

Methods: Optimal detection and attribution methods (e.g. Allen and Stott, 2003) will be used to attempt to separate that part of regional climate change which has been forced by chaning boundary conditions from that part associated with internal variability. 20th century simulations will be validated against North American station data to validate the climatology using RMS errors, correlations and other measures. Results will be compared with a similar analysis applied directly to the NCEP reanalysis itself.

Research Plan: Research to be carried out over 2009-2011.

Data: Primarily monthly mean precip and temperature from NCEP-forced simulations, though other data may be investigated.

 
 
 

Alice Gilliland

email: Gilliland.Alice@epamail.epa.gov

Alice Gilliland, Ph.D.
Chief, Model Evaluation and Applications Branch
Atmospheric Modeling Division
National Exposure Research Laboratory
U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development
USEPA Mailroom E243-01
109 T.W. Alexander Drive
Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
(919) 541-0347


Research

Main research goals: We are interested in future climate-related changes in atmospheric wet deposition of nutrients. We have some air quality and atmospheric deposition modeling results that rely on a regional downscaling scenario developed by Dr. Ruby Leung (see Leung and Gustafson, 2005; Gustafson and Leung, 2007). We would like to look at a range of precipitation pattern changes (current to future under A1B and A2 scenarios) to consider how different the wet deposition estimates of nutrients might be with different regional climate scenarios.

Research methods and plan: Our current regional-scale air quality modeling results include estimates of wet deposition of aerosol species, based on the regional downscaled results I mentioned above. Using a statistical model of wet deposition based on precipitation volume, we plan to estimate how different the model predicted deposition amounts would vary based on the NARCCAP precipitation fields.

What data are needed: We primarily just need the precipitation fields from the NARCCAP results.

Anticipated findings or significance of work: We hope to get a better feeling for how different the wet removal of air pollutants may be with different downscaled regional climate results and different IPCC scenarios.

 
 
 

Evan Girvetz

email: girvetz@u.washington.edu
website: http://faculty.washington.edu/girvetz/

Evan H. Girvetz
Postdoctoral Research Associate
College of Forest Resources
University of Washington
Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195-2100

Research Interests:
Climate change impacts and adaptation assessment
Landscape Ecology
Geographic Information Systems
Decision support tool development
Statistical Analysis


Research

Research Goals:
Although there is overwhelming evidence of climate change and policy responses are being discussed, natural resource managers have found it difficult to develop management and planning responses to both recent and likely future climate changes. One reason for this slow response is the absence of tools that translate cutting-edge climate science and climate-model simulations into a form that a manager can work with at a local or regional scale (CCSP 2008). Although large amounts of data exist regarding how climate has and is projected to change at specific places globally, these data are stored in databases that can be difficult to access. Furthermore, although analytical techniques are available for quantifying the potential effects of these changes, many require significant computing resources and analytical expertise. Scientists, managers, and policy makers (i.e. practitioners) need the ability to assess the potential effects of climate change on specific ecological systems within specific geographic areas at relevant spatial scales. However, a major gap exists between the need for and the accessibility of practical climate change analysis tools.

Research methods:
I use computer-based technologies to develop tools that make climate-change analysis more accessible, practical, and useful. These technologies include geographic information systems (GIS), statistical analysis platforms (e.g. the R Project), and web-based mapping services (e.g. Google Maps, KML/GML, and SOAP). Specifically, I am developing a framework and web-based mapping tool for practical climate-change analysis, called ClimateWizard, that anyone can easily use to analyze climate change at a given site(s) around the world (in collaboration with researchers at The Nature Consevancy and University of Southern Mississippi). The ClimateWizard is freely available as an interactive website that produces climate-change maps, graphs, and tables (http://ClimateWiz.org). It provides access to a wide range of climate data (both past observed and future modeled) and runs statistical analyses that address relevant ecological questions within specific geographic areas. The ClimateWizard uses two common approaches to representing climate-change data: (1) comparing climate in a given year or time period to a baseline period (climatic departures); and (2) calculating statistical climatic trends over a time period of interest using linear regression analysis.

The ClimateWizard tool was designed to be accessible to a wide range of users, allowing virtually anyone to perform simple climate analyses for anywhere data are available. Users can select an analysis area from a set of provided base data layers (administrative and ecological boundaries), they can upload an ESRI Shapefile, or they can draw directly on the web-mapping interface. The ClimateWizard uses ArcGIS SOAP web-services to access a time-series database of climate information stored on a remote computer server, and then uses the server's computing power to create outputs in the form of graphs, maps, tables, and GIS data layers tailored to the specific climate-change question being asked by the user.

Research Plans:
I am interested in the possiblity of using ClimateWizard to analyse, visualize and explore the NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Gashaw Gismu

email: ggismu@yahoo.com

I am an assistant lecturer, and now I am learning my masters programme.


Research

I want to conduct research on climate change using the SWAT model.

 
 
 

James Glenn

email: jglenn1@ou.edu

Senior undergraduate student at the University of Oklahoma. Double major in Meteorology and GIS. On track to graduate in May 2013.


Research

The main purpose of this research is to analyze climatological changes in evapotranspiration over the Great Plains using latent heat flux. Historical and future data will be used to analyze the historical changes and the future outlook for evapotranspiration in the region. ET is important in the Great Plains because it has a significant impact on irrigation and other farming practices, as well as playing a major role in the water budget and hydrologic cycle.

It is anticipated that there will be a significant decrease in ET over time as climate change reduces annual rainfall amounts and increases average temperatures in the Great Plains. This research can provide farmers and municipalities with another indicator of the future state of their lands and can help them better prepare for the future.

 
 
 

Michael Glotter

email: glotter@uchicago.edu

I am currently a graduate student at the University of Chicago, studying geophysical sciences. I am associated with the Center for Robust Decision Making in Climate and Energy Policy (RDCEP) through the Computation Institute on campus. I am interested in climate change, specifically understand the impacts and addressing them in an economic and policy framework.

Research
My current work involves assessing the impacts of climat change through a large-scale gridded crop model. I run my crop model with various climate products to better understand the necessary climate output and downscaling techniques in an impact assessment. I am coupling the NARCCAP data with corresponding GCM output from the CMIP3 archive, specifically looking at the CCSM3 and CGCM3 GCMs, along with the CRCM and WRFG RCMs. I hope to find the importance of dynamically downscaling GCM output in future agricultural impacts.

 
 
 

Peter Golden

email: Peteggolden@gmail.com

M.Eng Student at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Canada)

Research

Studying Effects on small watershed hydrology in Nova Scotia using regional climate models and SWAT (Soil Water Assesment Tool).

 
 
 

A Goldman

email: amygoldman@gmail.com


Research
I am interested in seeing how simulations of the northeastern United States compare to ring-width from western Massachusetts tree cores.

 
 
 

Don Goldstein

email: dgoldste@allegheny.edu
website: http://sites.allegheny.edu/dongoldstein/new-new-economy-for-a-warming-region/

Professor and A.W. Robertson Chair of Economics, Allegheny College, Meadville, PA Research interests: Environmental management; corporate adaptation to environmental change
Recent major research project: Dynamic capabilities for environmental management, Irish manufacturing With Rachel Hilliard, National University of Ireland - Galway

Research
The project explores a set of possible climate adaptation paths for private and public entities in northwestern Pennsylvania, a part of the southern Great Lakes region. Regional climate adaptation is analyzed as a function of two kinds of factors: existing, geographically specific economic assets and capabilities; and expected direct and indirect climate impacts at the regional level. NARCCAP climate projections for the Great Lakes region will be used in identifying a range of likely direct climate impacts.

Main research goal: Provide conceptual tools and plausible, opportunistic scenarios for private and public decision makers in strengthening a regional system of adaptive innovation.
Research methods: Integrate regional climate projections with key regional economic data suggested by the literatures on organizational capabilities, innovation clusters, and institutional configurations.
Research plan and data:
Direct climate impacts - construct a regionally specific application using early, middle, and late century projections from models at the best available scales (NARCCAP's Great Lakes; USGCRP's Great Lakes; the Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment's Pennsylvania and New York State reports).
Indirect climate impacts - identify and project key systemic, climate-related parameters likely to be salient for regional adaptation (relative energy prices; carbon, renewable energy, and intermodal transportation policies; relative regional water supplies and policies across the U.S.).
Regional assets and capabilities - inventory technological, labor supply, infrastructure, and other resources (planned online survey of several thousand business respondents via the Erie Chamber of Commerce; stakeholder interviews; searches of archival press and economic data sources).

Anticipated findings: Given systemic pressures for lower-carbon energy and transportation and the region's location along rail and inland shipping corridors, its major precision machining industry, and its proximity to Lake Erie wind resources, adaptation could revolve around enhanced intermodal transportation infrastructure, offshore wind, and machining capabilities scaled up for the large work required to build and maintain these industries. This path would require significant stakeholder collaborations and both private and public investments, undertaken in the face of uncertainty about critical variables like expected Great Lakes levels and extreme weather events.
Anticipated significance: Create an analytical framework that can help to reframe climate change in terms of adaptive innovation and opportunity, at the local levels where public opinion is formed and exercised.

 
 
 

Justin Goldstein

email: Justin.C.Goldstein-1@ou.edu

University of Oklahoma, Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability

Research
I'm investigating the hydrologic impacts of biofuel production in the Southern US under climate change.

 
 
 

Scott Goodrick

email: sgoodrick@fs.fed.us

Research interests: wildland fire- climate relationships and air quality impacts.

Research
Interested in using the NARCCAP data for examining potential changes in fire regimes in the southeastern united states due to climate change. Will likely also use the data to potentially drive air quality models to examine air quality impacts of future fire regimes.

 
 
 

Ranjith Gopalakrishnan

email: ranjith7@vt.edu


Research
I am working on a project that is assessing the possible impacts of climate change on southern pine forests. We plan to use various land-models and such for this. Hence, I would be accessing the NAPCCAP database for inputs about possible climate scenarios of the future.

 
 
 

Nichole Gosselin

email: nmckinne@slu.edu

I am a teaching Assistant at Saint Louis University.


Research

For my Master's thesis I would like to look at the effects of climate change on soil carbon stocks in the United States. To accomplish this, I will be using the DAYCENT model, a daily time-step version of the Century model, a soil organic matter model that also simulates soil fluxes of C, N2O, NOx, and CH4. I would like to use the NARCCAP HRM3(hadcm3) current and future datasets to look at how the changing climate will affect soil carbon. The model needs daily maximum and minimum temperature as well as precipitation. We have done similar research using different climate datasets, but would like to use a regional climate model for the climate data for this experiment.

 
 
 

Anne Graham

email: grahama@mit.edu

I am a librarian working with students and faculty who may use this data.

Research
I will be helping researchers find the data they need. If they end up using NARCCAP data, I will help them register for their own accounts.

 
 
 

Mark Green

email: mgreen@stcatharines.ca

Mark Green Manager of Environmental Services City of St. Catharines Lake Street Service Centre 383 Lake Street St. Catharines, Ontario L2N 4H5
Phone: (905) 688-5601 ext. 2193 Fax: (905) 646-6570 TTY Phone: (905) 688-4889
www.stcatharines.ca

Research
The data will be used in a climate change vulnerability assessment on an urban stormwater system. The main goal of the research is to predict stormwater impacts in St. Catharines, Niagara, Ontario, Canada, based on climate change scenarios. The NARCCAP data will be used to update the existing hydrologic models. The hydrologic data will be used in a continuous simulation to predict water quality and quantity (flooding) under climate change scenarios. XPSWMM software will be used for the flooding analysis. The anticipated outcome is an identification of areas with increased flooding risk and infrastructure requirements.

 
 
 

Pamela Green

email: pgreen@ccny.cuny.edu

I am a research associate at the CUNY Environmental CrossRoads Initiative

Research
We are running water balance models for the US and want to use the NARCCAP climate forcings.

 
 
 

Scott Greene

email: jgreene@ou.edu
website: http://www.ocgi.okstate.edu/owpi

I am a professor of geography at the University of Oklahoma and co-director of the Oklahoma Wind Power Initiative. I have also spent many years researching links between climate and human health, especially in the area of heat-related mortality.

University of Oklahoma
100 E. Boyd St., Suite 410
Norman, OK 73019
Tel: +1 (405) 325-8870
FAX: +1 (405) 325-6090


Research

The main part of our research efforts are to investigate the impacts of climate change on the wind fields, and more specifically, the patterns of potential wind energy production in the southern plains and beyond.

 
 
 

Giovanna Grossi

email: giovanna.grossi@unibs.it


Research

Climate and climate change data will be used to investigate the effects of climate change on soil erosion and sediment transport and production. For this experiment sub-daily precipitation, temperature, wind speed, radiation, and dew point temperature data are needed.

 
 
 

Susanne Grossman-Clarke

email: sg.clarke@asu.edu

Assistant Research Professor, Global Institute of Sustainability, Arizona State University


Research

Our research is related to an NSF sponsored grant, "Collaborative Research: Urban Vulnerability to Climate Change: A System Dynamics Analysis" (No. GEO-0816168).

The goal of our work is to assess potential future heat related hazards for people living in the Phoenix metropolitan region. Therefore we plan to conduct high resolution downscaling of global coupled model output for selected heat events. We will also investigate interactions of potential future climate and urban land use change and their effects on near-surface air temperatures and humidity.

CCSM projections downscaled to a 50 km resolution with WRF are analyzed in order to identify heat events that are characterized as potentially hazardous (for example extreme day and/or night time temperatures, duration of extreme temperature episodes). For those situations we will conduct high-resolution WRF downscaling.

Understanding the effects of potential climate change and urban land use changes on near-surface air temperature is particularly important in this arid region in order to enhance the adaptive capacity of a city that regularly experiences high average daily summertime temperatures and extended periods without rainfall. Large segments of the population are well adapted to extreme heat through access to air conditioning in their homes. However, Phoenix region studies show that minorities with higher poverty rates experience high vulnerability to extreme heat because of lower economic means to adjust to high temperatures as well as higher air temperatures in their neighborhoods.

 
 
 

Trevor Grout

email: tgrout@usgs.gov

University of Oklahoma; United States Geological Survey

Research
Climate change and hydrology relationships. Perform various studies for the USGS, the new Climate Science Center and etc.
Will use climate model data and apply to hydrologic model to determine potential impacts to streams throughout the southern united states.

 
 
 

Lanli Guo

email: lanli.guo@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

I am a post doctoral fellow in Bedford Institute of oceanography.

Research
We want to investigate the possible impacts of the future climate change over the Canadian Maritime region. We plan to drive ocean model OPA by using NARCCAP's data as the atmospheric forcing.

 
 
 

Kemal Gurer

email: kgurer@arb.ca.gov
website: http://www.arb.ca.gov

I received my Ph.D in Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and working as a research scientist at California Air Resources Board, located at Sacramento, California. My research interests are varied, including turbulence over complex terrain, the evolution of atmospheric boundary layer, effect of sea breeze and other atmospheric flows on the advection of contaminants, weather forecast, and the use of satellite and lidar on mapping boundary layer processes.


Research

I am working on the effect of surface fluxes on the evolution of the boundary layer flow, and ultimately the effects of atmospheric flow on the generation of secondary pollutants and the transport of both primary and secondary pollutants. I am using MM5 and WRF meteorological models to generate the input data for CMAQ photochemical model, which gives a different response in generation of certain secondary chemicals as a response to different soil moisture and temperature. Both meteorological models use predetermined tables to initialize the soil moisture and temperature depending on land use and land cover. I would like to be able to examine available soil data that you have, compare it with the amounts on the tables, and distribute the variable information over the modeling domain. I could not find any soil moisture and temperature data in California, especially at several depths, and I am currently looking for this particular data. Using the NARCCAP data, I hope to improve the initialization of the meteorological model.

 
 
 

Sunil Gurrapu

email: gurrapus@uregina.ca

I am Graduate Student in the Department of Geography at the University of Regina, SK, Canada. I obtained my Bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering and Master's Degree in Hydraulics and Water Resources Engineering from India.

Research
The primary objective of my research is to investigate the trends in extreme flows of the rivers in the southern Prairies and to evaluate the impact of SST indices on the frequency of extreme flow events. The purpose of this project is to develop an empirical model to account for the variability in streamflow in the rivers in southern Prairies based on the analysis of instrumental and longer proxy hydrometric records. This empirical model will be used to identify the processes, primarily SST indices, driving hydroclimate variability and to estimate the departures in the projected mean conditions of hydroclimate, obtained from the future climate simulations of Global and Regional Climate models (GCM/RCMs).

 
 
 

Ethan Gutmann

email: gutmann@ucar.edu

NCAR ASP Postdoctoral Fellow


Research

I will be applying a statistical downscaling to the NARCCAP 50km WRF-NCEP run over Colorado. I will develop the downscaling using 2 years of data for which I have substantial ancillary data, then apply it to a >10-year window, and compare the results to point observations. If this downscaling is successful, I will try this same procedure with the WRF-CCSM current climate runs, and then apply it to the WRF-CCSM future climate runs. Eventually this procedure could be applied to other RCMs and Climate models as well.

 
 
 

David Gutzler

email: gutzler@unm.edu

University of New Mexico

I'm particularly interested in seasonal/interannual/decadal variability and predictability, and how such variability might be affected by longer-term anthropogenic climate change.


Research

I have developed regional-scale climate change scenarios for the western U.S. derived from CMIP3 A1B-forced linear trends, with historical interannual variability superimposed on the model-generated trends. I'd like to compare these results with the output from NARCCAP simulations. I'm also interested in using the NARCCAP output to look more explicitly at surface hydrologic variability (snowpack and derived streamflow projections).

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Andrew Halmstad

email: halmstad@cecs.pdx.edu

Graduate Student
Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science
Portland State University
Portland, OR


Research

NARCCAP data will be used in a project that is focused on comparing multiple downscaling techniques. Currently both dynamical and statistical methods will be addressed in this research. Surface temperature and precipitation will be the primary candidates of interest for this study. The data will also be used as inputs for the hydrologic modeling of watersheds in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

The goal of this work is to determine the advantages and drawbacks of various downscaling techniques as they relate to the prediction of surface temperature and precipitation on multiple spatial scales.

 
 
 

Derrick Hambly

email: djhambly@uwaterloo.ca

I am a Master's student in geography at the University of Waterloo, where my studies focus broadly on transportation and road safety.

Research
I am particularly interested in the relationship between inclement weather and automobile crashes, as well as the potential implications of climate change for weather-related crash risk. While the former has been well documented in the literature, the latter has not. My research thus aims to provide a first estimate of the possible effects of climate change, specifically changing rainfall patterns, on road safety in Canadian cities.

 
 
 

Healy Hamilton

email: hhamilton@calacademy.org
website: http://research.calacademy.org/cabi

Our lab at California Academy of Sciences is focused on forecasting climate change impacts to species and ecosystems. We generate bioclimactic envelopes for conservation target species, and apply downscaled climate model outputs to assessing geographic range shifts. We are using several methods to address uncertainty in ecological forecasts, including generating future gridded climate surfaces from multimodel ensembles outputs.


Research

Our lab is interested in creating a large number of gridded future climate surfaces at relatively fine spatial resolution (1-10km2) for ecological forecasting. We are interested in a subset of NARCCAP data that is most manageable and relevant for ecological forecasting, such as tasmax and tasmin, huss, prtot, mrso, and snd. We will convert the outputs from most of these variables to monthly values, and use them in various species distribution modeling algorithms. Our biggest need is for NARCCAP data to be converted to a common grid format before we begin downloading and processing the data. I was a participant in the second NARCCAP user workshop and we are now gearing up to begin working with NARCCAP outputs. All of our derived NARCCAP data products will be available in GIS format for the biodiversity user community via a website we are currently building for other spatial climate datasets we have created, EcoClim.org.

 
 
 

Dorit Hammerling

email: hammerling@samsi.info

We are a group of researchers from various institutions participating in the 2009 SAMSI program on Space-time Analysis for Environmental Mapping, Epidemiology and Climate Change. Our sub-working group, led by Bruno Sanso from the University of California Santa Cruz, is focused on applying spatio-temporal statistical methods to regional climate model simulations within NARCCAP.


Research

We plan on comparing different regional climate models through an impact analysis of climate stress. The measures of climate stress will be either extended periods of high temperatures (heat waves) or a combination of extended periods of high temperatures, extended periods without precipitation and wind speed relevant to the occurence of forest fires. Our region of interest is the South-West of the United States including Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah.

 
 
 

Jonathan Hanes

email: jmhanes@uwm.edu

Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


Research

My main research goal is to assess the potential effects of climate change on forest phenology during the spring and early summer. I plan on implementing the climate data from the GCM runs into a canopy development model to examine the potential effects of climate change on canopy development. The results from this project will contribute to our understanding of how climate change may affect forest canopy development under a variety of climate scenarios.

 
 
 

John Hanesiak

email: johnhanesiak@gmail.com
website: http://www.ccrnetwork.ca/science-programme/research-themes/index.php

Dr. Hanesiak studies storms, extreme weather, mesoscale processes, and surface-atmosphere interactions. His research mainly relates to warm season processes, including convection initiation, thunderstorms and associated severe weather, as well as surface contributions via evapotranspiration and mesoscale boundaries.

Dr. Hanesiak is a professor in the Department of Environment and Geography at the University of Manitoba in Canada.


Research

The NARCCAP data will be used as part of research undertaken by the Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN)in Canada.

CCRN is a new collaborative research network bringing together the unique expertise of a team of over 50 university and government scientists, including 36 Canadian scientists representing 4 government agencies and 8 universities, as well as 15 international scientists. The network is funded for 5 years through the Climate Change and Atmospheric Research (CCAR) Initiative of NSERC.

CCRN’s objectives are to integrate existing and new sources of data with improved predictive and observational tools to understand, diagnose and predict interactions amongst the cryospheric, ecological, hydrological, and climatic components of the changing Earth system at multiple scales, with a geographic focus on Western Canada’s rapidly changing cold interior.

In particular, we intend to use output from the regional climate models to drive a coupled cloud and hail model (HAILCAST) to investigate changes in convective activity and hail over the CCRN study area, and ultimately over the N. American domain covered by NARCCAP. This research will contribute to the objectives for Theme D "Analysis and Prediction of Regional- and Large-Scale Variability and Change".

 
 
 

Adel Hanna

email: ahanna@unc.edu

Director, Center for Environmental Modeling for Policy Development
Institute for the Environment
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-6116


Research

Title: Effects of Climate Change on Human Health: Current and Future Impacts

Description: In this project we examine how climatic variations and the corresponding air quality conditions may aggravate heat- and cold-related morbidity among adults and vulnerable populations: in particular, the poor, the aging and children. We will demonstrate our analysis in the state of North Carolina. North Carolina displays substantial variability in weather (mountains to seaboard), population density (rural versus urban/suburban), and regional patterns of land use (urban/suburban versus forest versus agricultural).

Objectives/Hypothesis: The overall goal of the proposed research project is to define more precisely the interrelationships among (a) changes in climate and meteorological conditions, (b) air pollution, and (c) heat- and cold-related morbidity severe enough to warrant clinical contact. A secondary goal is to evaluate heat-related morbidity in a vulnerable population: children and adults under economic disadvantage. We propose a novel approach that views climate trends and the associated weather in terms of eight identified air-mass/weather types. We hypothesize that such air masses and the corresponding air quality conditions will have different health impacts on humans, which can be quantified based on statistical analyses of the correlates among the meteorological, climate, air quality, and health data.

Approach: Our work will consist of the following steps: (1) Characterize weather patterns and circulation types over the state of North Carolina; (2) examine temporal and regional variability in meteorological and climatological patterns of the state of North Carolina to identify abnorm

Data Needed: Hourly surface meteorological data (temperature, winds, pressure, etc.) for one or two future years (year 2040 or after)

Expected Results: We anticipate that the characteristics of the climate . air pollution relationship across North Carolina over time will be generalizable throughout the US, and that our proposed study will yield important insights regarding the impact of climate change and air pollution on heat- and cold-related morbidity, thus advancing our knowledge of the health effects of climate change and their predictability. Findings on applying environmental and climate data to decrease heat- and cold-related morbidity could result in a substantial public health impact, not just in North Carolina but throughout the United States.

 
 
 

Walter Hannah

email: whannah1@gmail.com
website: http://maloney.atmos.colostate.edu/whannah/


Research

My use of NARCCAP data will be to obtain regional estimates of precipitation changes in future scenarios in order to constrain parameters for experimental economic forecast models. I am an atmospheric scientist by training, but I'm branching out and collaborating with some economists that study water resource management.

 
 
 

Janel Hanrahan

email: janel.hanrahan@lyndonstate.edu


Research
The NARCCAP data will be used for educational and research purposes at Lyndon State College. We plan to use the RCM output to investigate historic and future variability in local (New England) climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. In addition the RCM output may be used to further dynamically downscale climate data using WRF. The faculty in the Atmospheric Sciences Department at LSC will use the NARCAPP data as an educational tool for exploring local impacts of climate variability. These data may also be used by undergraduate students for independent research thesis projects.

 
 
 

Keith Harding

email: hardi091@umn.edu

Research Assistant University of Minnesota

Research
The expansion of irrigation in the North American Great Plains has threatened the sustainability of the Ogallala Aquifer. Irrigation has been previously shown to result in the largest net loss of water during drought years. Droughts in the Great Plains are expected to increase in prevalence and severity due to climate change, likely causing accelerated stress on the Ogallala Aquifer. Our study aims to determine the full impact of irrigation on the hydrologic cycle in a world of expected increased drought intensity using future climate scenarios in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The use of NARCCAP data will allow for comparison between control simulations and previously simulated NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Daryn Hardwick

email: hada1102@stcloudstate.edu

Graduate student at Saint Cloud State University.

Research
I will be attempting to discover future spatial distributions of plants using the various scenarios of climate change.

 
 
 

Monica Harkey

email: mkharkey@wisc.edu

I am a post-doc researcher at the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Research
I will be investigating how climate change might affect air quality in the U.S. I will be using NARCAAP data as input into the WRF model as a first step towards modeling air quality (via the CMAQ model) and health effects of future climate change. We will be focusing on the 2050s and what the ozone and PM 2.5 concentrations may be on a regional scale (Eastern U.S., on a 12 km grid).

 
 
 

Jacob Harrel

email: harrelj@onid.orst.edu

OCCRI Researcher


Research

Comparing CMIP5 data

 
 
 

Jane Harvill

email: jane_harvill@baylor.edu

Associate professor, Statistical Science, Baylor University
Ph.D. in Statistics from Texas A&M


Research

I work in spatial and spatio-temporal statistics; in particular, in nonparametric modeling and prediction of such data in both the time and frequency domains. Currently, I am involved in a grant through Sandia Research Laboratory that is using these statistical techniques to model and predict global horizontal irradiance (GHI) for the purposes of predicting electrical output at solar energy plants. The weather plays a huge role in GHI. So one use for this data would be to incorporate weather information into our models.

 
 
 

Linnia Hawkins

email: linnia.hawkins@gmail.com

I am an undergraduate student at Montana State University in the Department of Mathematics (Statistics).


Research

I am doing a project for a multivariate analysis class which will assess temporal and spacial changes in climate. For this project I intend to create distance matrices from yearly multivariate climate data (temperature, precipitation, etc.) and examining the temporal and spacial relationship. Work is not intended for publication.

 
 
 

Lingli He

email: linglihe@umich.edu

PhD student at Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan interested in evaluating surface variables (temperature, precipitation, soil moisture and evapotranspiration) simulated by NARCCAP over the Great Lake Region.

Research
My project compares historical RCM simulations from NARCCAP (North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program) and simulations from their host global GCM to NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation System) dataset over the Great Lake Regions. Important land surface variables such as precipitation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and temperature will be examined. (I will choose one or two variables depending on the chance of collaboration with others).

 
 
 

Yufei He

email: yh4u@virginia.edu

Graduate student, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia


Research

My thesis is focusing on understanding the interactions between shrub ecroachment and microclimate of southwestern US. Other than micrometeorological tower and tethered balloon measurements, we also use regional model to investigate the feedbacks and try to couple it with a vegetation model to predict land cover change in decadal time scale under the scenario that climate is the only driver to shrub ecroachment. We are interested to use NARCCAP data to study the changes of minimum temperature of southwestern US and its relationship to shrub encroachment.

 
 
 

Zachary Heern

email: zheern@siu.edu

I am a graduate research assistant at Southern Illinois University. My research interests include meteorology and synoptic climatology. More specifically, I am interested in extra-tropical cyclone tracks, frequency, and intensity. Also, I'm very much interested in applying climatology to various areas such as agriculture, urban planning, ecosystems, water resources, and human health.

Research
I am a research assistant working on a collaborative NSF grant between Southern Illinois University and Indiana University that is looking at the effects of climate change on regional wind climates. My adviser and I are interested in understanding how extra-tropical cyclones affect regional climate.

 
 
 

Sam Heft-Neal

email: sheftneal@berkeley.edu

I am PhD student in the department of Agricultural & Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. My background is in livestock economics but I have recently become more interested in the effects of climate change on both livestock and crop productivity. I work primarily in SE Asia but am also interested in Californian agriculture.

Research
While an increasing number of studies have examined the historical relationship between climate and agricultural output, I am interested in the relationship between climate and livestock productivity.
I am in the process of collecting provincial-level historical production data for pigs, chickens, cows, and buffalo in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia, and Viet Nam. I would like to incorporate the NARCCAP climate data for SE Asia in order to examine the link between livestock productivity and various measures of temperature/rainfall. In addition, I would like to use future climate scenarios to estimate potential effects on the livestock sector in SE Asia.

 
 
 

Katherine Hegewisch

email: khegewisch@uidaho.edu

Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Geography, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

Research
We are investigating how different methods of downscaling influence the uncertainty in projected impacts on a region. We are using statistical downscaling methods: BCSD, MACA and the dynamical downscaling from NARCCAP. We are looking at agro-economic metrics for impact assessment.

 
 
 

Majana Heidenreich

email: majana.heidenreich@tu-dresden.de
website: http://tu-dresden.de/meteorologie

Hydrologist, research assistant at Chair of Meteorology, Technical University Dresden, Germany

Research
- analysis of climate change for the state of durango (mexico) using data from the model combinations HadCM3/HRM3 and GFDL/HRM3 because of domain size - comparision with GCM-AR4 data - the results are one input for the development of adaptation strategies in agriculture for tow study sites near Durango city and Gomez Palacio

 
 
 

Brian Helmuth

email: helmuth@biol.sc.edu
website: http://climate.biol.sc.edu

Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Columbia, SC 29208 USA
Ph: (803) 777-2100
Fax: (803) 777-4002
http://www.biol.sc.edu/~helmuthlab


Research

Ecological Forecasting of Effects of Climate Change on Coastal Ecosystems

My research explores the effects of climate and climate change on the physiology and ecology of marine organisms. Specifically, I use thermal engineering techniques, including a combination of field work, remote sensing and mathematical modeling, to explore the ways in which the environment determines the body temperatures of coastal marine animals such as mussels and seastars. A major goal of this approach (funded by NASA and NOAA) is to predict where and when the effects of climate change are likely to occur so that we can mitigate these effects, a method of "ecological triage". To date my work has centered primarily on temperate rocky intertidal systems in the United States and Europe.

Our work has shown some surprising results, and has suggested that our expectations of where to look for the effects of climate change in nature can be more complex than previously anticipated. For example, our research has shown that along the Pacific coast of the U.S., animal temperatures at sites in Oregon and Washington can be as hot or hotter than sites much farther to the south in California, due to the complex interaction of weather and tides in the region. As a result, we should not necessarily expect to see mortality at the southern ends of species range boundaries, but also at these "hot spots." This complexity suggests that unless we know where and when to look for impacts of climate change, many early impacts could go unnoticed.

I will use NARCCAP data as input data to biophysical heat budget models to predict the body temperatures of intertidal organisms which, when combined with physiological information, will produce spatially and temporally explicit predictions of growth, reproduction, and survival in ecologically key species.

 
 
 

Amanda Hering

email: ahering@mines.edu

I am an assistant professor at Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado in the Mathematical and Computer Sciences department. http://inside.mines.edu/~ahering/

Research
I would like to investigate the impact of climate change on the wind resource and assess the variability in those changes anticipated from multiple climate models. To address the first goal, I would like to develop/implement methods for visualizing the trends in a given climate model over both space and time. Ideally, these trends could also be quantified. Then as of 07/28/11, eight regional climate models are publicly available with speed and direction at 10 meters agl. I would like to investigate whether there are significant spatial and temporal differences between these models in terms of wind resource changes.

 
 
 

Sixto Herrera

email: sixtohg@gmail.com

I'm Sixto Herrera, a researcher of the Santander Meteorology Group from Santander-Spain.

Research
As a consecuence of our participation in some fire-related projects we are interesting in databases containing some specific variables (pr, tas, hurs and wss) in order to build the Canadian Fire Weather Index. This fire risk index must be built with noon values of the temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. Most of the actual databases only store daily mean values of these variables leading to an underestimation of the index and other problems associated to threshold dependent parameters.
The NARCCAP databases contains all the information needed to realize a significance study with this index, showing the main limitations of the daily mean values and other proxies used actually.

 
 
 

Maria Herrmann

email: masha.herrmann@gmail.com

Sigma Space/NASA GSFC and The Pennsylvania State University


Research

I work with the Chesapeake Bay Program to look at the effect of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay watershed. We are analyzing the output of the Chesapeake Bay watershed model (HSPF 5.3) forced with climate projections from several climate models forced with SRES A2 emissions scenario. I would like to make a comparison of HSPF climate projections to the NARCCAP mid-century stream flow projections in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. We anticipate, that NARCCAP flow projections will have more modes flow reductions than what we are finding with HSPF simulations.

 
 
 

Daryl Herzmann

email: akrherz@iastate.edu

I am a collaborator with NARCCAP PIs at Iowa State University and partially funded by the NARCCAP project to support the MM5 runs made here for the project.

Research
I do not have any specific goals, just do what the NARCCAP PIs tell me to do :)

 
 
 

Jeremy Hess

email: jhess@emory.edu
website: http://www.sph.emory.edu/faculty/JHESS

I am a medical epidemiologist at CDC and work in the global climate change program. I am also a practicing emergency medicine physician at Emory University and have joint appointments in the Emory University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. I am particularly interested in extreme events and public health preparedness. My specific topical interests include heat waves, extreme precipitation, waterborne disease, and energy utilization.


Research

We will be using the data to develop scenarios for extreme heat events to use in extreme event planning. For instance, we plan to derive historical ranges for maximum and minimum temperatures for a given region, project out average Tmax and Tmin values, and generate estimates of extreme heat events from these projections. These estimates will be used to create scenarios of extreme heat events that will then be used in conjunction with local emergency managers, power company officials, and other relevant parties to explore service demands. From this we hope to identify potential multi-system failures and shore up response planning accordingly.

 
 
 

Ryan Hill

email: ryan.hill@usu.edu

I am a researcher at USU studying the effects of climate change on stream/river temperatures.


Research

I am working with Jiming Jin of the USU Plant, Soils, and Climate Department to predict the effects of climate change on stream temperatures within the conterminous USA. I would like to compare Jiming's climate projections with those developed by NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Torben Hilmers

email: torben.hilmers@forst.tu-dresden.de


Research

I am a Student of forestry science at the technical University of Dresden. In line with my Master's thesis I am interested in doing a species distribution model for pseudotsuga menziesii in Saxony (Germany). To fit my model I need the daily mean temperature and the daily precipitation sum of the occurence area of douglas fir (Oregon, Washington and British Columbia) for the refernce period from 1971-2000.

 
 
 

Paul Hines

email: paul.hines@uvm.edu

Broadly, my research focuses on electric power systems, with a significant portion of this research focusing on renewables integration.

Research
I am working to better understand the similarities and differences between wind speeds in climate models and empirical wind speed data. My collaborator, Chris Danforth in Mathematics at UVM, recommended that I look at the data available with the NARCCAP project.

 
 
 

Satoshi Hirabayashi

email: satoshi.hirabayashi@davey.com


Research

Analyze climate change effects to urban forest ecosystem services.

 
 
 

Jonathan Hobbs

email: jonhobbs@iastate.edu

I am a PhD student studying statistics and meteorology at Iowa State University. I am interested in applications of spatio-temporal statistical models in weather and climate, and their utility in comparing climate model simulations.

Research

The goal of this work is to apply non-parametric, spatial statistics techniques to illustrate characteristics of the climate distribution for several fields, including precipitation, temperature, and sea-level pressure. The approach can quantify uncertainty in the spatial distribution and highlight which aspects (center, spread, extremes) of the field's distribution differ across different climate models and between models and observations.

Data from the NCEP-driven runs will be used from most NARCCAP models. Daily and monthly data over several small regions of North America will be extracted. Initially, the data will guide some investigation of statistical issues such as sample size, level of spatial aggregation, and temporal aggregation. The technique will then be applied to all models and observed data sets over the same areas. This approach will help quantify uncertainty in characteristics of the spatial distributions produced by regional climate models and will help identify differences among models that are large relative to that uncertainty.

 
 
 

James Hocker

email: jhocker@ou.edu
website: http://www.southernclimate.org

James Hocker is the University of Oklahoma (OU) program manager for the Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP) which is part of NOAA's RISA program. Along with managing SCIPP, James' work focuses on identifying the climate service and information needs of decision-makers across the southern U.S. (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas) as they pertain to climate hazard and adaptation planning. His research interests focus on applied climatological research and extreme event climatologies with a particular emphasis on geographic information systems. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.


Research

The Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP) has several research projects and outreach activities that could benefit from the use of NARCCAP data. The following are several such applications:

  • To incorporate NARCCAP data into a GIS-based climate hazards planning tool currently under development. The hazard-planning tool will contain both historical climate hazard data as well as future climate projections which will be used by decision makers for hazard mitigation and adaptation planning purposes.
  • To help southern U.S. decision-makers be better prepared for climate change, especially in the areas of water resource management, coastal management, and adaptation planning. This would be accomplished by providing NARCCAP data through the SCIPP website with associated explanations regarding model uncertainty, limitations of climate models, and how to understand and interpret the information.
  • To provide NARCCAP data and imagery as part of SCIPP's public outreach and education activities.

Additional research and application projects ideas are being developed, many of which could make use of NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Zachary Holden

email: zaholden@fs.fed.us


Research

I'll be exploring the application of NARCCAP data as a means of statistically donwnscaling nocturnal minimum air temperatures in mountains. I have deployed hundreds of air temperature sensors across the northern Rocky Mountains. These data will be used to parameterize and validate high resolution air temperature models.

 
 
 

Eva Holtanova

email: eva.holtanova@mff.cuni.cz

I am a researcher in the Department of Meoteorology and Environment protection, Faculty of Mathemathics and Physics, Charles University in Prague. I have been working on analysis of global and regional climate model simulations for creation of climate change scenarios, with a special focus on uncertainties in RCM outputs.

Research
I will be applying several methods of uncertainty analysis, which I already applied for the european area (using simulations from PRUDENCE and ENSEMBLES projects). My main interest is a comparison of influence of driving data and the structure of the RCM on the total variance of the multi-model ensemble.

 
 
 

Seungbum Hong

email: sbhong@mail.utexas.edu

Seungbum Hong (Bryan), Ph.D.
Department of Geolgocial Sciences
Geology Building 5.220E
23rd Street @ San Jacinto Blvd.
Austin, TX 78705
Phone (512) 471-5355
Fax (512) 471-9429
Cell (803) 719-6336


Research

I'm working a land surface model at University of Texas at Austin. The reason that I want to use NARCCAP data is to make future surface hydrology using a LSM in order to study how the future climate affect the future land surface hydrology.

 
 
 

Yang Hong

email: yanghong@ou.edu
website: http://hydro.ou.edu/

School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences
The University of Oklahoma
Remote Sensing Hydrology Research Lab
National Weather Center, Norman, OK 73072

phone: 405-325-3644


Research

Main Research Goals: Study the impacts of climate change on water resources and hydrologic extremes in Oklahoma

Research Methods: Using RCMs forcing data, we will use the VIC land surface model to predict future water availability over Oklahoma. We will then couple the mesoscale VIC Model with NOAA/NWS/Research Distributed Hydrological Model (RDHM) for modeling streamflow and hydrologic extremes.

Expected Outcome: The proposed Regional integrated Climate-Hydrologic-Water Continuum Modeling Framework is expected to lead to improved understanding of the impacts of climate change on future hydrologic variability and water resources availability in Oklahoma and SGP.

 
 
 

Siavash Hoomehr

email: shoomehr@utk.edu


Research

I am a graduate student (PhD) at the University of the Tennessee, Knoxville. My dissertation is about future climate change effect on the erosivity of rainfall in the Appalachian region. Technically, in water resource I have seen lots of journal papers that use global model outputs and use the statistical downscaling methods to downscale the data to regional temporal, spatial scale, but there are not a good comparison between hydrological differences when using statistical downscaling results and the regional model outputs. At the first step I want to compare these two results and on the next stage I want to see their effect on the rainfall erosivity and erosion of east of Tennessee, Appalachian region.

 
 
 

John Horel

email: john.horel@utah.edu

Dept of Meteorology
University of Utah


Research

We're interested in examining the downscaled present and future climate in the intermountain region of the West. After local and regional validation of the NARCCAP model simulations for the present climate, much of the work would be related to examining relationships between winter precipitation in the mountains and synoptic-scale features in the models. Are there trends in the number of storms, intensity, etc., during the winter season? Of particular interest will be to examine how changes in free-tropospheric temperature may related to changes in the rain-snow line.

 
 
 

George Hornberger

email: g.hornberger@vanderbilt.edu
website: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/viee/

Current projects include work on transport of dissolved organic carbon in watersheds, on nitrogen fertilizer use and fate as influenced by individual behavior, on life-cycle analyses for an inland water transport company, and on the water-energy nexus.


Research

Water resources are controlled in large part by climate and many of the major projected impacts of climate change are linked to changes in available water quantity and quality. Natural variability of climate and the strong influence of changes in land cover and land use complicate the analysis of the effects of anthropogenic climate change. Water and climate change both interact strongly with human activities in ways that are complex and often poorly understood. Water use is conditioned by beliefs and norms, which influence land and energy use, which in turn influence climate and, thus, water supply. Just the energy-water nexus, a subset of the larger climate-water-behavior system, is itself remarkably complicated.

We are initiating work to examine the following question: What are the spatio-temporal interrelationships among climate, water quantity, quality, and consumption variables? How are these affected by and how do they affect land and energy use? We first want to explore relationships among variables statistically and examine potential implications based on projections of regional models of climate change.

The project is at an exploratory stage and detailed description of methods and anticipated results is premature. Two Ph.D. students want to explore the application of singular value decomposition and principal components techniques to discern patterns in a multivariate data set they are assembling. Results from regional climate models are one component of the data they require.

 
 
 

Radley Horton

email: radley.m.horton@gmail.com

Radley Horton is an Associate Research Scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University, working with Cynthia Rosenzweig's Climate Impacts group. He conducted his graduate work with David Rind at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University in New York. His Ph.D. research focused on regional impacts of climate variability and climate change as simulated by Global Climate Models. He has published on topics including polar climate, high-latitude climate variability and change, sea level rise, and adaptation to climate change. He is involved in current (and recent projects) in the New York Region examining impacts of climate change on the water system, transit systems, and Long Island coastal ecosystems. Additional projects include climate change impacts on agriculture in the Southeastern United States and Central America, alternative projections of 21st century sea level rise, and impacts of changing lower boundary conditions on Arctic meteorology. At the Center for Climate Systems Research, he helps conduct regional climate change scenario assessments for stakeholders around the globe.


Research

The Climate Impacts Group at NASA GISS is interested in NARCCAP output for several potential applications:

  1. Drive further downscaling with the WRF-ARW model to the metropolitan level
  2. Directly drive impact assessment models (of agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and/or water resource management)
  3. Examine the sensitivity of large-scale circulation patterns to climate scenarios
  4. Determine the statistics of extreme events in participating models
  5. Evaluate the ensemble and member statistics to determine whether NARCCAP-like projects are justified for climate impact assessments in other regions of the world.

Of primary initial interest is the downscaled 20th Century climate scenario, followed by the A1B scenarios in the mid 21st Century.

 
 
 

Timothy Howard

email: thoward@tnc.org

I work as part of a team within the New York Natural Heritage Program which is a collaboration between the NY Department of Environmental Conservation and The Nature Conservancy. I am a plant ecologist by training and am now working in conservation biology and landscape ecology. We have institutional collaborations with local universities and other NGO and governmental organizations.


Research
We are looking for current and future climate data to help inform our habitat distribution modeling efforts. In particular, we are actively engaged in a project funded by State Wildlife Grants with match funding from the Hudson River Estuary Program and Cornell University, seeking to determine the current and potential future habitat connectivity for 25 Species of Greatest Conservation Need in the Hudson Valley. Using advanced modeling techniques in a Geographic Information System, we will use climatic, geological, and land cover data to determine how connected the landscape is for these 25 species, under current climatic conditions and with potential future changes in climate. Results from this project will be used to determine priority locations for conservation in the Hudson Valley.

 
 
 

Ryan Hruska

email: Ryan.Hruska@inl.gov

Idaho National Laboratory


Research

I am interested in using RCM runs to drive landscape dynamics models in order to evaluate the impact of potential land management policies. Vegetation structure and composition influence the local water cycle through evapotranspiration and interception. Alternative management policies have a direct impact on this process, and in order to evaluate the magnitude of these impacts, changing climate must also be evaluated. We intended to use the RCM outputs provided by NARCCAP to drive the VDDT-TELSA (Vegetation Dynamics Development Tool/Tool for Exploratory Landscape Scenario Analyses) model to address this. In addition, we are considering using the ouputs of this analysis to drive a distributed regional hydrologic model such as RHESSys (Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System Model.

 
 
 

Jianhua Huang

email: jianhua.huangsdu@gmail.com

I am a graduate student at Arizona State University.

Research
My research is concentrated on the modeling of Climate change and energy demands at high spatial and temporal resolution(50*50km, hourly or 3-hourly).

 
 
 

Yue Huang

email: hy800821@163.com

I am working in Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences,China. Main research interests of our group are hydrological and ecological processes in arid region of Xinjiang provinve, Northwest China. During past decades, changes in global climate will have significant impact on arid and semi-arid area, which will in turn affect ecological, hydrological, social and economical systems. However, climate-change impact studies on hydrologic system in Northwest China have been relatively rare until recently.

Research
Now, we are conducting a research about investigating hydrologic impact of climate change in the Tarim River Basin, Northwest China. The NARCCAP data would help us in this research. This study applies different types of statistical downscaling techniques to generate the possible future values of local meteorological variables such as precipitation and temperature in the Tarim River Basin. The downscaled data is used as input to two different hydrologic models to simulate the corresponding future flow regime in the catchment.

 
 
 

David Huard

email: huard.david@ouranos.ca

David Huard is a physicist specializing in climate scenarios for hydrological impacts assessments. He works for Ouranos, a consortium dedicated to regional climate modeling and adaptation. Huard is also interested in the analysis of extreme rainfall events and their uncertainties through Bayesian analysis, sea-ice modeling, high-performance computing and data analysis in general.

Research
I am currently working on building an ensemble of climate scenarios for a project looking at salmonids habitat quality. The ensemble already contains CRCM simulations and I want to include a few simulations from the NARCCAP to get a better coverage of modeling uncertainties. Down the road, the team I am working with will use selected climate model outputs to drive a 1D lake model (MyLake) to estimate changes in salmonids habitat in response to changes in water temperature. There is little chance that raw model output will provide satisfactory results so there will likely be a post-processing step, either in the form of bias correction or the delta method, using a multivariate quantile mapping method that I am developing.

 
 
 

Chad Hudson

email: chadhudson@fs.fed.us

Zone NEPA Coordinator USDA Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Jackson, WY

Research
Models will be utilized to consider climate change in project-level National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis and documentation.

 
 
 

Doug Hultstrand

email: dhultstrand@appliedweatherassociates.com


Research

Investigating rainfall in data limited areas.

 
 
 

Oleksandr Huziy

email: guziy.sasha@gmail.com

I am a PhD student at Department of the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, UQAM. Mainly interested in climate modelling of atmosphere and inland water bodies.

Research
I am going to use Surface runoff and Subsurace runoff fields, in order to pilot a distributed river routing model (Watroute). This work is required to insure quality of the input to the routing scheme and increase confidence in the obtained climate change signal.

 
 
 

Syewoon Hwang

email: aceace111@ufl.edu

I am a Ph.D. student in Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida with a dissertation project directed by Dr. Wendy Graham (Director of UF Water Institute) on the research project for improving water management system. my background is hydrology, and the research focuses on climate and hydrologic modeling for assessing the impacts of climate change on hydrologic responses in west central Florida.


Research

I am interested in the temporal and spatial variability of historical precipitation in the Tampa Bay region and evaluation of the ability of the mesoscale downscaling model (MM5), developed by Penn State University (PSU) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), to reproduce this variability. The long term goal of this effort is to evaluate the utility of using MM5 to downscale GCM forecasts and climate change scenarios for improving water management decisions in the Tampa Bay region.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Rich Inman

email: rdinman@usgs.gov

I am a researcher at the USGS who works on species distribution models in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the Southwest.

Research
We are working on species distribution models for multiple species in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the Southwestern USA. These models include predictions of habitat change under differing climate scenarios. I hope to use NARCCAP data to improve these models and inform current and future land management policies for conservation of desert biodiversity.

 
 
 

David Inouye

email: inouye@umd.edu

Dr. David W. Inouye, Professor
Dept. of Biology
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742-4415


Research

Main research goals - My work has focused on a long-term study of variation in the phenology and abundance of flowering by about 100 species of wildflowers. I have a 35-year record for these variables from permanent plots at RMBL and am interested in forecasting how they may change in the future. This project is currently supported by funding from NSF. Most of the variation in flowering phenology is explained by variation in snowmelt dates, and for quite a few species there is also a correlation between winter precipitation and abundance of flowering.

Research methods - See this paper for an example of how I have used data on snowpack to explain variation in flowering phenology and abundance: Inouye, D. W. 2008. Effects of climate change on phenology, frost damage, and floral abundance of montane wildflowers. Ecology 89(2): 353-362.

Research plan - The same paper gives an example of how I use environmental data to explain variation in flowering phenology and abundance.

What data are needed - I would be interested in projections of future trends in precipitation (especially as snowfall) and temperature (as it affects snowmelt) for the area around the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (38°57′N, 106°59′W).

Anticipated findings or significance of work - To the degree that the future of snowpack and snowmelt can be predicted, I can predict the environmental consequences for flowering by wildflowers, and hence predict how their population biology may be affected.

 
 
 

Michelle Irizarry

email: mirizar@sfwmd.gov

Lead Engineer with the Hydrologic and Environmental Systems Modeling Department at the South Florida Water Management District.

Research

Recent climate change projections by the IPCC (2007) and numerous projections of Sea Level Rise have the potential to cause significant impacts on water resources management and on existing and future ecosystem restoration projects in south Florida.

The IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) includes projections of climate change based on General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation results for a series of green-house gas emission scenarios. Volume II of the AR4 report discusses potential impacts of climate change, adaptation measures, and vulnerability of coastal systems and low-lying areas. However, these assessments are limited to potential regional scale impacts and are not detailed nor certain enough to provide meaningful guidance for water resources management and planning at local scales.

Statistical and dynamic downscaling methods may provide additional value at local scales which are relevant to water resource managers. Our modeling group is interested in obtaining downscaled predictions of climate change which could be used to drive our hydrologic models. The purpose is to assess potential impacts of climate change on flood control and water supply functions of water resources management, and on existing and future ecosystem restoration projects in south Florida. The plan is to first validate output from each RCM/GCM NARCCAP simulation and to use those results in weighing their future predictions of climate change for the region of south Florida.

 
 
 

Kirsten Ironside

email: Kirsten.Ironside@nau.edu
website: http://www.mpcer.nau.edu/gradient/research.html

I am part of a research team funded by the The National Institute for Climatic Change Research (NICCR), which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER). We are reaching the final stages of our project, which originally identified using global time slice experiments and the regional climate model results for the NARCCAP project for predicting potential impacts of climate change on dominant plant species along the C. Hart Merriam elevation gradient, in addition to the IPCC AR4 GCM we statistically downscaled as part of the project.

GIS Research Analyst
Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research (MPCER)
Geospatial Research and Information Laboratory (GRAIL)
Northern Arizona University
Bldg 22 Rm. 316
P.O. Box 6077
Flagstaff, AZ 86011

Office: (928) 523-0861
Cell: (928) 220-1140

http://www.mpcer.nau.edu
http://www.mpcer.nau.edu/grail/


Research

This project is funded for three years starting September 1, 2006 by the The National Institute for Climatic Change Research (NICCR) ,which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The goal of NICCR is to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The project brings together experts from a variety of backgrounds in climate and climate change modeling, ecosystem research, past vegetation change, inventory and monitoring, and ecosystem modeling. This unique integration of interdisciplinary researchers provides a great potential to better understand and predict the impacts of climate change on natural systems. We feel it is impossible to project changes in the geographic boundaries of U.S. terrestrial ecosystems or biomes without understanding how the species that form them will respond. Our regional modeling effort includes all the dynamic components important to controlling a species distribution; it is a key step for moving modeling forward. SIMPPLLE models and other landscape process models have been developed for several other areas in the U.S. but many of them have not yet incorporated GCM output. Our proposal will improve modeling for climate change impacts by merging biogeographical/habitat models with dynamic vegetation modeling and by merging climate modeling with ecosystem modeling.

For this modeling effort 26 dominant plant species occurring along the 3,000 m elevation gradient from the low deserts of the Grand Canyon to the alpine tundra of the San Francisco Peaks in Northern Arizona to represent the regional study area have been selected.

The study hypothesizes future changes in climate will cause dominant plant species to independently shift distributions, resulting in a reshuffling of plant associations. Also many future disturbance processes influenced by climate such as bark beetle outbreaks, drought mortality, wildfire frequency, and exotic species spread, can be simulated using climate model results.

We are currently working on an extension of this project. We have completed the statistical downscaling of the AR4 IPCC A1B GCM contributions, developed 32 suitable climate models for dominant plants, and parameterized a dynamic vegetation model for incorperating climate data. We would like to obtain the results currently available at the NARCCAP site for running our models on and also to compare with the results of our statistically downscaled data as orignally proposed.

 
 
 

Naiful Islam

email: nzi0001@auburn.edu

Graduate Research Assistant at the Biosystems Engineering Department of Auburn University in Auburn Alabama.


Research

The objective of the research is to study the spatial and temporal variation of erosivity in the state of Alabama under various climate change scenarios. This assessment will be made using the RUSLE model which requires sub daily (30 min) precipitation data to compute erosivity of a storm. Since the spatial and temporal output of GCM's are far coarser than what is required, downscaling methods must be applied to the outputs to meet the spatial and temporal needs. The information yielded by this research can be used by relevant state policy makers to address issues of erosion control.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Jennifer Jacobs

email: jennifer.jacobs@unh.edu
website: http://www.unh.edu/erg/faculty/Jacobs/


Research

Implications of Climate Change on the Performance and Design of Flexible Pavements in New England

The research goal is to quantify the change in pavement performance under current and future NARCAPP climate scenarios. We will use Regional Climate Model datasets as inputs, through intermediary hydrologic functions, into a Pavement Design Model. The Regional Climate Model datasets developed from multiple Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models will be sourced from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program's climate change simulations. These datasets include Regional Climate Model output for current (historical) conditions, 1971-2000 and future conditions, 2041-2070. The model output, precipitation and air temperature and soil temperature and moisture derived from the intermediate hydrologic functions will drive the Pavement Model using pavement profiles typical for the New England region. A hierarchical statistical model framework will be used to provide probabilistic performance metrics as well as error analysis. This probabilistic dataset will guide the identification of important variables for pavement performance and climate change thresholds.

 
 
 

Jake Jacobson

email: jacob.jacobson@inl.gov


Research
We are developing an energy-water model that estimates impacts of new energy systems on water availability and timing for large basins. We have used the Upper Snake River system for our modeling area but the modules are generic enough to be transferred to other basins. We are now looking for data to estimate climate change on water totals and timing.

 
 
 

Atul Jain

email: jain1@illinois.edu

http://climate.atmos.uiuc.edu/atuljain/

Research
My research group investigates global climate change through development of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM). ISAM is a fully coupled atmosphere-terrestrial biogeochemistry model with current development taking place regarding the interactions between the carbon, nitrogen and hydrological cycles.
ISAM has been used to estimate historical changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, biogenic emissions, terrestrial productivity and carbon sequestration in relation to biomass burning and land cover and land use changes. ISAM has also been used to study general ocean circulation patterns and ocean biogeochemistry.
Research is currently underway in the Jain group to provide integrated assessments of global climate change impacts on the carbon and nitrogen cycles with particular emphasis on biofuel production, biogenic emissions, biomass burning, land cover and land use changes, and rising greenhouse gases.

 
 
 

Tsou Jaw

email: chochunc@uci.edu


Research
I am a postdoc in CHRS, Irvine. My research goal is mainly focused on the bias correction for the downscaled climate variables. I might use the RCM-downscaled precipitation before and after applying bias corrections to compare with the reanalysis data.

 
 
 

Badde Jayakody

email: jb2038@msstate.edu

Graduate student from Agriculture and Biological Engineering department of Mississippi State University

Research
The overall goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of climate variability on water quality, water quantity, and crop production in two differently managed Mississippi watersheds using modeling approaches.

Methods: Two SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) models will be setup for the UPRW and BSRW in Mississippi river Delta. Models will be calibrated and validated using monthly USGS gage stream flow data and other observed water quality data (sediment, nutrient). Management practices relevant to those watersheds will be taken from secondary sources and personnel communications and field visits. Once the models perform well for the historical monthly USGS stream flow data, future data (temperature and precipitation) will be introduced to the models. Future data will be taken from NCAR data archives. Future prediction will be carried out for next 50 years to be consistent with the previous studies on climate change (Parajuli, 2010) in Mississippi. Statistical tests (such as T- test and F-test) will be carried out to see the significance of changes of runoff and ET, between current and future climate.

Expected outputs:
* Predicted future stream flow data for the UPRW and BSRW
* Understand the behavior of two differently managed Mississippi watersheds on climate variability
* A list of most sensitive modeling parameters for the study area

 
 
 

Dae Il Jeong

email: jeong@sca.uqam.ca

Ph.D Dae Il Jeong Post-doctoral Fellow E-mail: daeil922@naver.com
Research interest: I am interested in climate change impacts on regional extreme climte, probabilistic streamflow prediction using ensemble prediction technique and physical hydrologic models, frequency and risk analysis, development of statistical downscaling and weather generating models, and development of water quality models (e.g. water temperature).

Research
Changes to the severity and frequency of hydro-climatic extremes can affect various sectors including agriculture and energy; it is hence of high importance to assess characteristics of extreme events in the context of a changing climate to enable appropriate adaptation strategy. In my current project, I study projected changes to floods and droughts, over Canada, using a multi-RCM ensemble (NARCCAP: North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program). Hydrological phenomena like floods always appear as multivariate events that are characterized by various components such as volume, duration, and flood peak. In many aspects of water resources planning and management, information about the magnitude, duration, and volume of the critical flood events is essential. This requires the probability of the whole flood event rather than the probability of only peak discharge. Therefore, a multivariate modelling approach to account for the interdependence of peak, volume and duration of a flood event is used in this study. Similar analysis will be performed to model meteorological and hydrological droughts.

 
 
 

Xiaoyan Jiang

email: jiang.ut@gmail.com


Research
I am interested in using NARCCAP data to understand future climate change over the Southwestern US and its impacts on the ecosystem. Regionally downscaled climate information can be used to understand the climate extremes and their impacts on ecosystem.

 
 
 

Lucinda Johnson

email: ljohnson@d.umn.edu

I am an aquatic and landscape ecologist; my research focuses on quantifying linkages and feedbacks between the landscape and aquatic ecosystems at scales ranging from local to regions. We are interested in the effects of multiple stressors on aquatic ecosystems ad biota; climate change is one of the stressors we are addressing.


Research

I lead a group of university and state agency researchers who have assembled historic data encompassing lake and stream water quantity and quality parameters along with biological (primarily fisheries) data. We are currently evaluating trends with respect to ice out dates and past climate. We are currently engaged in data analysis using a variety of statistical techniques. Models quantifying evaporation have been developed; in conjunction with precipitation data we have quantified trends in lake water availability. Trends in surface water temperatures have been indentified; we are currently examining these data with respect to lake morphometry and landscape context using a variety of regression and multivariate techniques. Trends in fish community assemblages and walleye spawning dataes have been examined; spawning dates are highly correlated with ice out dates. A series of tools have been developed to summarize climate trends; lake water quality and temperature trends can be summarized and displayed. A synthesis manuscript is in preparation.

Our next goal is to predict changes in lake water level, temperature, water quality, and fish assemblages from downscaled climate data. Our aim is inform management and policy with respect to adaptation strategies needed to best manage Great Lake and regional aquatic resources.

 
 
 

Edson Jose

email: ejose@uvic.ca

Dear all! I'm a MSc student at University of Victoria, original from Mozambique (Africa). I work for the government in Mozambique, Ministry of Fisheries, division of Aquaculture. My research interest is the effects of climate change on aquaculture.

Research
As described above, I am a MSc Student at University of Victoria. My research topic is Effects of Climate Change on Aquaculture in British Columbia. This is an investigation of anticipated impacts in the Strait of Georgia. My research goal is to investigate how aquaculture sector will be impacted by the effects of climate change, specifically changes in sea level, sea surface temperature (SST), salinity (SSS) and beach albedo. The research method is basically based on GIS analysis. the research plan includes analyse and understanding climate models that simulates changes in Sea level rise, SST, SSS and beach albedo. For that I will be using sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity and beach albedo. The significance of this work will be a contribution to complement mitigative strategies that are aimed at addressing climate variability and to adequately respond, cope and adapt to living in a changing climate for the benefit of the fisheries and aquaculture sector in British Columbia.

 
 
 

Li Juan

email: twlj0419@126.com
website: http://yutong

I am a graduate student in HOHAI University, and currently doing a project to investigate the climate change effects on multiple factors of North Atlantic sea level.

Research
I am interested in using NARCCAP data to support my research on impacts of climate change on extreme events and water resources. Specific focus is on how to incorporate climate change into the computation of risk and uncertainty associated with future design life cycles of structures and flood control projects.I researching dynamic mechanism of the sea level change in the North Atlantic.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Erik Kabela

email: kabela@email.sc.edu

I am currently a Ph.D candidate in Applied Climatology at the University of South Carolina. I have a B.S. in meteorology from Valparaiso University and a M.S. in agricultural meteorology from Iowa State University. My current research interests, in general, are on the different downscaling techniques used on global climate models. Ultimately, I see myself working with a few global climate models, downscaling them using dynamical downscaling, comparing them with observed meteorology, and also making a few assessments about future climate for the Southeast U.S. and potential issues (and non-issues).


Research

I would like to use the NARCCAP data for a semester project to learn how to compare output from models (like NARCCAP) to observed meteorological conditions (such as reanalysis data) for the Southeast U.S. I have found a few approaches, such as the Bayesian approach, which could be used to make comparisons. My goal is to compare a few meteorological fields such as temperature, precipitation rate, and a few others to observed values. This will be an excellent training tool for me so that when it comes time to perform my anticipated doctoral research, I will have a firm understanding of the approaches to compare regional climate models to observations and the techniques used to obtain a technically sound comparison.

Upon completion of my semester project, I will forward my findings to the Community Manager.

 
 
 

Mehdi Kadkhodaei

email: mahyarlacey@gmail.com

I am a student, studying for my master of science in water resource management.


Research

I want to research the effects of climate change on hydropower dams

 
 
 

Pratap Kafle

email: pkafle@ucalgary.ca
website: http://people.ucalgary.ca/~kutzrg/GradStudents.html

I am a graduate student at the University of Calgary, Canada. I am working with Dr. Susan Kutz who is a well known personality in the field of Arctic parasitology and wildlife.


Research

I am trying to study the epidemiology of parasites which cause lung infection in Muskoxen in the arctic. To be specific, I am focusing on the impact of climate change in distribution and rapid range expansion which has been evident over the years. I need climate data of Victoria Island and whole Canadian arctic over a historical period and projected future so that I could use them in the model to understand its range expansion in relation to the increasing temperature. I will be using the surface temperature data from available historical period.

The study is significant to understand this rapid range expansion of the parasite which has potential health effect. This also is relevant to the conservation point of view as the population of muskox is declining over the years. This project aims to generate some key epidemiological findings in the field of arctic parasitology and wildlife health.

 
 
 

Emily Kang

email: lei@samsi.info
website: http://www.stat.osu.edu/~lei

I obtained my Ph.D. in Statistics at The Ohio State University. I worked as an intern in the summer 2008 at NCAR with Stephan R. Sain. Currently I am a postdoctoral fellow at Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) and working in the 2009-10 Program on Space-time Analysis for Environmental Mapping, Epidemiology and Climate Change.


Research

Currently I am collaborating with Stephan R. Sain (NCAR) and Noel Cressie (Ohio State Univ.) on combining regional climate model (RCM) outputs using Bayesian hierarchical methods. We have used our methodology on the RCM outputs in Phase I and I would like to generalize our model and methodology for the Phase II study. Our method would help scientists understand the variability of RCM outputs and we can combine the outputs to produce a "consensus" regional climate. Different from the previous work in the literature (e.g., Tebaldi et al., 2005 and Smith et al., 2009) where the climate signal averaged over some region is studied, I will investigate the spatial variation carefully with a flexible class of spatial covariance structure. Meanwhile, dimension-reduction methods will be developed to handle the large data sets resulted from the high-resolution of the RCMs. Although we are currently focusing on the spatial analysis (outputs are averaged over years) of the RCM outputs, it is also one of our future plans to generalize the current spatial model to the spatio-temporal framework. Additionally, multivariate model will also be investigated.

 
 
 

Sarah Kapnick

email: skapnick@atmos.ucla.edu
website: http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/csrl

PhD Candidate
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
University of California, Los Angeles


Research

I am interested in using output to further downscale climate data over the state of California to assess hydroclimate changes using the WRF regional climate model. I hope to gain an understanding of the variability and predictability of water supply from mountain snowpack. I also wish to compare model output to observed hydroclimate variables.

 
 
 

Gregory Karlovits

email: gregory.s.karlovits@usace.army.mil
website: http://www.linkedin.com/in/gskarlovits

MS Civil Engineering, Washington State University Thesis topic: Risk analysis for stormwater runoff under climate change scenarios for the Pacific Northwest BS Civil Engineering, Michigan Technological University Current work: Hydrologic engineer at US Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island District Lead in hydrologic modeling of climate change impacts for USACE projects at Rock Island District Research interests: Stochastic hydrology and extreme value theory; risk analysis in hydrology; hydroclimatology; coupled hydrologic-climate modeling; distributed hydrologic model development

Research
Currently I am providing support for the USACE St Paul District on a climate change pilot study. The investigation is aimed at investigating changes in flooding for the Red River of the North in the northern Great Plains. The study intends to investigate how different downscaled climate datasets can affect the results of hydrologic modeling of climate change scenarios, as well as to gain insight into the possible future of flooding in the Red River basin. NARCCAP data will be compared to other downscaled datasets (potentially BCSD and BCCA sets depending on availability) and to observed climatology in order to assess the differences in the results of these downscaling methods, and the ability for regional climate models to represent the meteorology of the study region. These results will also be used to drive hydrologic models in order to investigate possible changes to flood frequency due to climate change. The major challenge in this region is the appropriate modeling of snowmelt flooding, which will come from meteorological data that represent the region well and a hydrologic model that captures the effect correctly. The primary goal of this pilot is to build familiarity within St Paul District and USACE with the different downscaled datasets and to use them appropriately in order to inform decision making under a changing climate.

 
 
 

Ambarish Karmalkar

email: ambarish.karmalkar@ouce.ox.ac.uk

Postdoctoral Researcher School of Geography and the Environment University of Oxford Oxford, UK

Research
I study climate change in Central America and in the Caribbean. I use high resolution RCM data create climate change information for the island nations in the Caribbean. I plan to use NARCCAP data to study climate change in the Bahamas and compare the 50-km NARCAAP outputs with the CMIP3 results for the region.

 
 
 

Bassem Katlan

email: b-katlan@hotmail.com

I am working with the Arab center for the studies in arid zones and dry lands the state of Arab league.


Research

Working on monitoring desertification and drought.

 
 
 

Sho Kawazoe

email: shomtm62@iastate.edu

I am a first year graduate student, attending Iowa State University. Currently, I am working under the supervision of Dr William Gutowski. I graduated from Iowa State University with the B.S in Meteorology and Environmental Studies in May 2009.


Research

My current research involves using archived NARCCAP data during the time frame of 1979 to 1999, and determine what the synoptic, 500mb flow and anomalies show during these events. Currently, the research determines extreme events as precipitation in the top 10% of the data, and focuses on the cold half of the year (October-March), in the Greater Upper Mississippi and Coastal California region. Further research planned include analyzing the bottom 10% of events, expanding regions outside of the two analyzed, and looking the daily extreme data, using the 3-hourly data.

 
 
 

Binita KC

email: leebinita@gmail.com

I am Binita KC, PhD candidate at University of Georgia.I am interested in accessing climate change and interested in climate change vulnerability assessment.


Research

I want to use NARCCAP data to assess future vulnerability by combining social data with the climate projections. I will be building vulnerability index at county level for the state of Georgia. This study will be useful for developing adaptation strategies.

 
 
 

Michael Keables

email: mkeables@du.edu
website: http://porfolio.du.edu/mkeables

Associate dean, Natural Sciences and Mathematics and associate professor, Department of Geography, University of Denver. Research interests include synoptic climatology, hydroclimatology, and the impact of climate change on water resources.


Research

I am working on a project that models soil water variability in the Great Plains using a climatic water balance approach. The research models standard water balance parameters (evapotranspiration, changes in soil water storage, and runoff) at the individual soil unit level. I am interested in using regional climate model simulation results to assess the impact of climate change on soil water storage parameters during the next 100 years. Soil water in the Great Plains provides is a significant resource for agriculture, and predictions of increased temperatures on the order of 3-4C throughout the region will have significant impact on evapotranspiration rates. The available soil water capacities for the different soils will most certainly impact soil water utilization/recharge and runoff, and by applying the downscaled model results will provide an opportunity to identify spatial patters of potential impacts of climate change on available soil water conditions.

 
 
 

Tim Keitt

email: tkeitt@utexas.edu
website: http://www.keittlab.org/

Tim Keitt is currently and Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

Research
I study the dynamics and organization of ecological systems. We scale the individualistic approach to landscapes and regions using various modeling tools. I am particularly interested in problems related to spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the environment and its impact on population, community and ecosystem processes.

 
 
 

Goitom Kelem

email: edugoitom@gmail.com

I am a graduate from Arba Minch University in the field of Meteorology (BSc degree). I am now working in (NMA)National Meteorology Agency of Ethiopia on department of Numerical weather prediction(NWP). I am interested in research on rainfall variability over tropics with warming of Indian ocean. I use grid and text data in my work and will be incorporating Access data and change from text-to-grib12 and from grib12-to-text data format.

Research
I use NWP model for early warning over large and specific area in Ethiopia as well as east Africa region. I will use NARCCAP for the sake of verification of the actual data with model out put.

 
 
 

thijs kelleners

email: tjkelleners@gmail.com

Associate Professor: soil physics
University of Wyoming


Research

The NARCCAP data will be used to force a 1-D vertical numerical soil water, heat, and carbon flux model to assess drought conditions in Western US rangelands.

 
 
 

Gaige Kerr

email: ghk35@cornell.edu

I am a junior studying Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. This summer (2013) I am working with Professor Art DeGaetano and postdoctoral fellows Daniel Ward and Cathelijne Stoof on a research project on the effects of climate change on fire risk in the US Northeast.


Research

I am an undergraduate collaborator on a study researching the effects of climate change on fire in the northeast. The goal of this project is to calculate Canadian Fire Weather Indicies (FWI) using a program developed by Dr. Mike Flannigan at the University of Alberta. These FWI values will allow us to assess the impact of climate change on fuel loads, fire weather, and fire occurrence and area burned.

FWI have been calculated for the period 1979-2012 using NARR datasets, and future FWI values will be computed using climate models. The results of this project include:

  • Fire risk (in the form of FWI) for selected years in future
  • Fuel load outlook for selected years in future
  • Prediction of fire occurrence and area burned for selected years/windows in the future

 
 
 

Ibraheem Khan

email: ibraheem@umd.edu

I am a graduate student doing PhD at University of Marland at College Park. My research interests are Climate Change, Hydrology, and GIS.

Research
For my PhD research work, I need NARCCAP data to perform the rainfall-runoff analysis. Model combinations provided by NARCCAP are ideal for my research.

 
 
 

Nicole Khan

email: nicole.khan@mbakercorp.com


Research

We are performing an analysis of climate change impacts to various aviation facilities and their related infrastructure. The analysis includes an assessment of increased rainfall and sea level rise impacts on the storm drainage systems. Changes in the hydrologic cycle due to increase in greenhouse gases are projected to cause variations in intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation events; we are studying these effects.

 
 
 

Vyacheslav Khon

email: khon@ifaran.ru

I am research scientist at Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics. The field of my interests is global and regional changes in hydrological cycle, paleo-climate modelling, diagnostics and modelling the climate changes in polar regions under future scenarios.


Research

My research plan will be dedicated to future projections of Artic regions in the 21st century. The most important attention will be paid to future changes in Arctic sea ice cover along the Canadian Archipelago. We will investigate potential changes in lenght of sea ice season with possible consequences to the Arctic marine navigation along the North West Passage in the 21st century.

 
 
 

Ryan Kilgren

email: Ryan.Kilgren@dhi.us

I am employed by DHI Water and Environment, which is the US subsidiary of DHI. DHI is an independent, international consulting and research organization with headquarters located north of Copenhagen, Denmark. We have a staff comprised of 1000 people located in more than 25 countries and the marjority of whom hold post-graduate qualifications and serveral years of consulting, research, and innovative development experience with respect to the water environment. My personal background includes a master's degree focused on numerical modeling for freshwater riverine influences in the Columbia River and Fraser River estuaries and coastal oceans. My professional focus at DHI is primarily on watershed hydrology, riverine hydraulics, and integrated water resources - meaning dynamically coupled hydrologic and hydraulic modeling for surface water and groundwater systems. Within the context of my professional interests, is an inherent desire to incorporate climate change influences in the conceptualization and numerical implementation of hydrologic model scenarios.

Research
My main research goal for the use of NARCCAP data is to understand how it can provide improvement and more focused localization of hydrologic analysis with physical forcings taken from predictions of future conditions. I hope to provide community knowledge transfer regarding the usefulness of this data for water resources project during various meetings and potential conferences.
My research methods will include:

1. Downloading, or acquiring, NARCCAP datasets
2. Reviewing the spatial and temporal extents and variations of the data
3. Leveraging and updating existing climate data query and timeseries (point and spatially distributed datasets) perturbation utilities to create alternative condition timeseries data for hydrologic/hydraulic model input
4. Perform hydrologic/hydraulic model simulations
5. Compare and communicate results

The data that I am interested in are regional climate model output grids and other downscaled datasets.
I anticipate the findings and significance of this work to be directed towards the communication of the usefulness of these datasets and availability of tools for implementing the data in the planning framework for regional water managers.

 
 
 

Chang Ki Kim

email: 62beatle@yonsei.ac.kr

Ph. D. Chang Ki Kim

Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks
Office: 1-907-474-5869 e-mails: ckim45@alaska.edu/62beatle@yonsei.ac.kr/62beatle@gmail.com


Research
I and my supervisor want to analysis the air quality from biomass burning using the climate projection. As you know, global warming affects the vegetation growth, which is the potential fuel for biomass burning. That's why I use NARCCAP projection.

 
 
 

Jeehoon Kim

email: jhkim@huskers.unl.edu

Graduate student Specialization: community and regional planning with GIS Interests: urban climate change (UHI), social impact assessment, GIS, remote sensing

Research
Main topic of my paper is closely related with geographical pattern of urban climate change (UHI) and assessment of social impacts caused by the urban climate change. NARCCAP data will be used to find out climate projections which are critical issue to proceed based on some specific climate change model.

 
 
 

Jinwon Kim

email: jkim@atmos.ucla.edu

A researcher at University of California Los Angeles. Specializes in regional climate modeling and link with climate change assessments. Also works on atmosphere-land atmosphere.

Research
The main use of NARCCAP data is regional climate model evaluation and the application of NARCCAP products to the NASA National Climate Assessment Project (PI: Duane Waliser, JPL; Co-I: Linda Mearns, NCAR; C. Mattmann, JPL; J. Kim, UCLA).

 
 
 

Yuri Kim

email: yuri513@email.unc.edu

I am a Ph.D student in Geography department of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I am interested in hydrology and hydrometeorology.


Research

I want to use NARCCAP data for forecasting future water use availability. I am using hydrologic model to estimate water discharge in terms of the changing environment--landuse/landcover change and climate change. So I need simulated future climate data (precipitation, Tmax, Tmin, radiation, etc.) for my research.

 
 
 

Anthony King

email: kingaw@ornl.gov

Research Staff Member, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and member of the Oak Ridge Climate Change Science Institute. Ecosystem theorist and modeler with particular attention to regional and global scale issues of system response to anthropogenic environmental change.


Research

In general, investigations of regional climate change impacts on terrestrial ecosystems and coupled socio-ecosystems. More specifically, we are engaged in a number of efforts to bring regional climate projection to bear on user defined issues including the vulnerability of military installations and urban infrastructure to projected climate change. Key features of these studies include the translation of climate change variables from regional (and global) climate change models into user-relevant climate hazards and the "packaging" of this informaton in forms useful to and useable by those involved in climate change assessment and decsion supoort.

 
 
 

Ian Kirby

email: icmk201@exeter.ac.uk


Research

I am currently a PhD Research Student. My research is looking at how climate change is currently affecting worldwide mining operations. I would like to use regional climate data to investigate what the future climate maybe for mining areas within the Northwest Territories region of Canada. It is hoped that the results of this particular project will help the Canadian mining industry to adapt efficiently to how the climate may change in the future. Any data which is used will be fully acknowledge.

 
 
 

Andrei Kirilenko

email: andrei.kirilenko@und.edu

Associate Professor
Department of Earth Systems Science and Policy
University of North Dakota
Grand Forks, ND 58202-9011
Phone: 701-777-6761
Fax: 701-777-2940

I am primarily interested in development and application of integrated models to assess the impacts of climate change on environment. My ongoing and recently completed research projects include the assessments of climate change impact on distribution of insect pollinators in North America, land use and climate change impact on the hydrology of a terminal lake in North Dakota, climate change impact on water security of the Aral Basin countries, climate change impact on food security of Russia, forest vegetation zone shifts, and others. My research interests also include land use change in relation to urban sprawl, model-data fusion, model ensembles, and model-GIS integration.


Research

The data will be used in two studies of climate change impacts on the Upper Great Plains. In the first project, we will be studying the impact of climate change on hydrology of two watersheds in North Dakota: Devil's Lake and Little Missouri River. The climatic data series will be used as an input to the Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) for the rainfall-runoff model and the Reservoir System Simulation model (HEC-ResSim) for reservoir modeling and flow routing. For the second project, we will evaluate climate change impact on agricultural production in North Dakota. Temperature and precipitation data series will be used together with DSSAT-CERES model of wheat production.

 
 
 

Daniel Kirk-Davidoff

email: dankd@atmos.umd.edu
website: http://www.atmos.umd.edu/~dankd

Daniel Kirk-Davidoff is a climate dynamicist with interests in paleoclimate modeling, wind power-climate interactions, satellite climate monitoring, the use of satellite data to improve climate models. He uses a range of climate models, from simple two-dimensional models to coupled climate models, to explore the dynamical basis for such fundamental aspects of climate as the pole-to-equator temperature difference, and the mean tropopause height, to understand the interaction of surface topography and roughness with climate, and to generate and test hypotheses about the connections and feedbacks among tropospheric dynamics, stratospheric overturning, the stratospheric water vapor budget and polar stratospheric clouds. In addition, he design tests of global climate models' fidelity to data that are directly relevant to the models' predictions of the sensitivity of the earth's climate to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, and works to develop optimal observing strategies for climate monitoring satellites.


Research

My student Daniel Barrie and I are carrying out a DOE-sponsored research effort to investigate the impact of anthropogenic climate change on the future wind power resource. We have analyzed the IPCC AR4 model runs. Our results to date indicate a wide range of predicted change in the wind power resource, with predictions ranging from modest decreases to increases of 20% over high-wind regions of the United States. Adding the high resolution NARCCAP data to our analysis would enhance our ability to calibrate the present climate wind resource by comparison with SeaWinds QuickScat winds, and would also allow better discussion of the relation of future forced changes to topography and mean climate.

 
 
 

Whitney Kirkendall

email: whitney.kirkendall@tetratech.com


Research
The NARCCAP data will be used for a climate change analysis for south Orange County, California. The climate change analysis is part of an integrated regional water management plan.

 
 
 

Michael Klatt

email: mdklatt@ou.edu


Research
NARCCAP data will be used to investigate future changes in rainfall, including trends in rainfall extremes such as droughts and heavy rain events.

 
 
 

Jeremy Kobor

email: jeremyk@oe-i.com


Research

My research involves the development of distributed physically-based hydrologic models of Russian River tributary watersheds in Sonoma County. These watersheds have been identified as priority watersheds for restoration and recovery efforts for Coho salmon and other endangered and threatened salmonids. The models are being applied to quantify streamflows throughout the watersheds and in particular summer baseflows. Model outputs are being used to quantify available habitat volumes relative to salmonid requirements. The models are also being used to evaluate various scenarios aimed at evaluating the impacts to summer baseflows from expected future changes in land- and water-use. NARCCAP data will be used in conjunction with the numerical hydrologic models to evaluate how climate change may alter groundwater recharge and baseflow conditions in these watersheds and how climate change may affect efforts to protect and enhance baseflow conditons for salmonid recovery.

 
 
 

Shesh Koirala

email: skoirala@utk.edu

Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment (ISSE)
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville


Research

Goal of research: Climate change impact on hydrology and water resources in Southeast USA.

Objectives: 1.to evaluate the climate change effects on the future streamflow volume at different watersheds in the region 2. to perform the uncertainty analysis.

Data: Precipitation, temperature (surface and air), etc

Different watershed models (eg. SWAT) will be used/evaluated.

 
 
 

Nikolinka Koleva

email: nikolinka.genova@zmaw.de
website: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/Nikolinka.5804.0.html


Research

My research focuses on climate change pesticide use and environment interactions. For the analysis of this interaction, I build an integrated modeling framework covering climate changes, their impacts on agricultural management, and environmental consequences and policies. The data that I require from North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program will be used to update the existing version of my integrated modeling framework

Working versions on my study are available at: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/Publicatio.6604.0.html.

 
 
 

Rao Kotamarthi

email: vrkotamarthi@anl.gov

I am employed as an atmospheric scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. My primary interests are in modeling the role of aerosols in modulating regional climate and uncertainty in observational data sets.


Research

We are interested in developing scenarios for future crop yields over the Midwestern USA. We have recently implemented cropping models in the CLM (Drewniak, Prell, Song, Kotamarthi and Jacob, submitted, 2010). Using this model we are planning to evaluate the changes in the yields of corn and soybean under changing climate conditions. We would like to use NARCCAP results at 50 km resolution for this purpose. We have been using ARM data set from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma to develop climatology of low-level jets using observations from the RASS platform for the summer months. Using the same algorithm to search for the existence and frequency of these events in the NARCCAP out is also of interest to our group.

 
 
 

Eleni Koukidis

email: eleni.koukidis@gmail.com

In 2007 I earned my M.Sc. Geography from the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada) in focusing on Statistical downscaling (SDSM) of Global Climate Models (GCM) in Southern Ontario with implications on hydrological modeling. Currently I'm contracted with the Adaptation and Impact Research Division (AIRD) of Environment Canada providing climatological and hydrological modeling support as well as GIS and statistical assistance to the various projects, reports and presentations undertaken by the group.


Research

The Adaptation and Impact Research Division (AIRD) of Environment Canada, supervised by Dr. Brad Bass and partnered with the Canadian Climate Change Scenarios Network (CCCSN), is looking to create 3D models of major cities, such as Metropolitan Toronto, to assess adaptations to reduce the urban heat island effect. I personally am responsible for obtaining climatological data to create future regional climate scenarios using statistical methods to downscale various GCM output as well as analyzing various RCM output to minimize the potential uncertainty involved with modeling future climatic variable. What we need from NARCCAP is access to North American RCM data, other than the CRCM, to determine the boundaries of uncertainty involved with the climatic portion of our study.

 
 
 

Aristeidis Koutroulis

email: aris@hydromech.gr

I am specializing in climate change impacts on water resources, weather extremes, and several other sectors such as agriculture, energy and tourism. During the last 10 years I have been involved in a number of research projects, many of them are related to climate change impacts (HELIX FP7, IMPACT2C FP7, ECLISE FP7, COMBINE FP7, WATCH FP6, SCENES FP6), three of which are ongoing (HELIX, IMPACT2C, ECLISE).


Research

My current research objectives that will be supported by NARCCAP data as well as all CMIP5 modeling output is to make a comparative study between CMIP3 and CMIP5 regarding the advancements in the ability to realistically reproduce basic hydrologic variables like precipitation and temperature, used for hydrologic application. Another aim is the bias correction of these outputs and run biophysical impact models from local to global scale.

 
 
 

Anil Kumar

email: anil.kumar@nasa.gov

I'm working on land-atmospheric interaction studies and hydrology using NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) modeling system. I have a strong interest in climate and weather modeling.


Research

Recently I joined on Purdue Sponsored project titled "Useful to Usable (U2U): Transforming Climate Variability and Change Information for Cereal Crop Producers". It is an integrated research and extension project working to improve farm resilience and profitability in the North Central Region by transforming existing climate information into usable knowledge for the agricultural community. Our goal is to help producers make better long-term plans on what, when, and where to plant, and also how to manage crops for maximum yields and minimum environmental damage.

Use existing data and models to better understand the contributions of anomalous weather to crop variability and implications for future management options.

Understand the use and value of climate information for agricultural decision making, and determine effective methods for disseminating usable climate knowledge.

I am going to work closely with Prof. Dev Niyogi (Purdue University) and Gene Takle (Iowa state Univ) on bias correction in climate model output data. And also use Regional climate model data in crop model.

 
 
 

Sanjiv Kumar

email: kumar34@purdue.edu

I am a PhD student at School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University. My research interests include: water resource scenarios (quantity and quality) in future climate change conditions, land surface and atmospheric interaction, feedback mechanism for precipitation, downscaling of climate model outputs for hydrologic modeling applications.


Research

Main research goals: Making contributions towards better understanding of future water resource scenarios at the regional level.

Research methods and plan:

  1. Understanding the recent past (last 500 years), how humans have interfered with regional hydrologic cycle including precipitation, temperature, land use and land cover change.
  2. Using global and regional climate models to conduct sensitivity experiments for the conditions.
  3. Linking/validating model output with the available historical records, including socio-economic data.
  4. Modeling for future water demand and water quality at the regional scale using downscaled climate model outputs to drive hydrologic models and studying the subsequent effect on water quality.

Anticipated findings or significance of this work:

  1. Better understanding of human interference in the hydrologic cycle
  2. Water resource scenarios for the future scenarios in different regions of the world.
 
 
 

Vinay Kumar

email: vkumar@fsu.edu

I am a Research Associate in Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmosphere Science, Florida State University. I am working in the area of climate modeling, using various coupled models output.

EOAS -- Meteorology
Florida State University
P.O. Box 3064520
Tallahassee, FL 32306-4520


Research

The NARCCAP data will be useful to understand the reason for extreme precipitation over North American region. Various experiment done by NARCCAP will be suitable for my study to address the issues of the regional variation of rainfall. With the use of statistical downscaling method and then using multimodel superensemble scheme we are trying to improve precipitation forecast for the North American region. I have worked with APHRODITE datasets, where variabilty of rainfall over various regions of Monsoon Asia is addressed at 25km resolution.

A similar kind of approach will be performed for North American region for July, August and September months. Using NARCCAP datasets will be added advantage to look into the climate change aspect also.

 
 
 

Colin Kunzweiler

email: ckunzwei@asu.edu

I am a graduate student in the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. My research interests focus on evaluating perceptions of risk to mosquito-borne diseases, such as West Nile virus, in Maricopa County, AZ. In my research, I employ ethnographic research methods as well as geographic information science.

Research
I am currently interning for the Arizona Department of Health Services in the Office of Environmental Health and the Office of Infectious Disease Services. For one of my projects, I am conducting a state-wide social vulnerability assessment with regard to extreme heat events for both the present as well as in the future. A necessary component for this analysis will be accurate climate data with regard to temperature and precipitation. I am still quite new to acquiring and manipulating climate data, but many individuals have recommended NCAR and NARCCAP as a potential source for data.
Objective: To elucidate vulnerable populations within the state of Arizona, both now and in the future, to extreme heat events. This will represent the first such attempt for the Arizona Department of Health Services, and will fulfill the requirements of a grant received from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Research methods: We will utilize geographic information systems to incorporate sociodemographic as well as climate data.
Research plan: A primary barrier to completing this project is identifying and acquiring appropriate sources of data. The Arizona Department of Health Services currently is long out of date with regard to census and other demographic data, and climate data has never been obtained. As such, NARCCAP data for temperature and precipitation will represent one of the few instances in which ADHS has utilized environmental, specifically climate, data.
NARCCAP data: I will need to read the descriptions and metadata for the various RCM/GCM runs with the hope of identifying one run that performs particularly well with regard to temperature and precipitation, or for the Arizona-region in general.

 
 
 

Chun-Chao Kuo

email: gujcl@yahoo.com.tw


Research
A regional mesoscale climate model, MM5, is adapted to simulate the long-term summer (May-August) precipitation of central Alberta. To evaluate uncertainty among different models, our AM (Annual Maxima)of precipitation will be compared with those obtained from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) multi-model ensemble simulations using NCEP reanalysis input data. This analysis will determine whether the model performance is comparable to other models and whether it is within the bounds of intra-model uncertainty.

 
 
 

Hyun-Han Kwon

email: hkwon@jbnu.ac.kr

I am an assitant professor at Chonbuk National University in Korea. My experties are hydrology, hydrometeorology and water resources. I am interested in assessing climate change impact on water resorces and now working with Dr. Jayantha Obesekera in South Florida.


Research

I am mostly interested in assessing climate model bias and correcting the bias in a Bayesian framework. My work is try to integrate climate and hydrologic model in order to assess cliamte change impact on water resources, and develop statistical downscaling model to simulate local climate change scenario using advanced statistical model such as learning machine and Hierarchical Bayesian Models.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Martin Lacroix

email: Martin.Lacroix@mwhglobal.com

Engineers Canada and its partners created the Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) to conduct an engineering assessment of the vulnerability of Canada's public infrastructure to the impacts of climate change. PIEVC developed a protocol to guide in the assessments. The City of Calgary (The City), in cooperation with PIEVC, is embarking on a jointly-funded project to conduct a vulnerability risk assessment of its water supply system to future climate change, and assessment of the protocol procedures. The City has retained Associated Engineering (AE) to evaluate the impacts of climate change on municipal infrastructure, working with the PIEVC risk assessment protocol.


Research

The risk assessment includes all of the City’s water supply infrastructure and operations and management as well as planned upgrades or major rehabilitation projects in the planning stages. The City’s water supply system consists of the Elbow Valley and Bow River Watersheds, Glenmore reservoir, Bearspaw and Glenmore water treatment plants, storage and conveyance systems. External components integral to the infrastructure include the Bearspaw Dam and Ghost Dam owned and operated by TransAlta.

The goal of this study is to identify the potential vulnerability of the City’s water supply infrastructure to climate change for the years 2020 and 2050 using the PIEVC risk assessment protocol.

 
 
 

Christine Lamanna

email: clamanna@email.arizona.edu

Ph.D. Candidate, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona


Research

We are ecophysiologists who study the effects of altered temperature and precipitation on carbon fluxes from subalpine meadow vegetation in the Colorado Rockies. We are interested in using NARCCAP data to find the best predictions for future changes in precipitation and temperature in these high altitude ecoystems. Combining our study of carbon flux and predicted changes in precip and temperature will allow us to project changes in carbon flux and feedback from subalpine meadows in the coming decades.

 
 
 

Daniel Lamhonwah

email: lamh0170@mylaurier.ca

I am a Master of Environmental Studies student enrolled in the Joint Graduate Program in Geography at Wilfrid Laurier University and The University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario.


Research

The following research abstract has been submitted to the Canadian Association of Geographers.

A Gis-Based Approach To Projecting Responses Of Sugar Maples To Climate Change In Ontario, Canada

Climate change is projected to threaten the forests of Ontario. A rise in surface temperatures and changes to precipitation patterns are forecast across the province. These changes are likely to impact the distribution of forests and stress tree species, such as the sugar maple. Temperature increases are likely to shift the range of sugar maples northward. However, this migration is projected to be limited by the acidic, shallow soils, rocky terrain and steep slopes associated with the Canadian Shield environment of central and northern Ontario. This project uses computer-based software called GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to project where the sugar maples in Ontario are likely to be located in the future. Maps will be produced to show how sugar maples will respond to climate change by the year 2070 under the low, medium and high level carbon emission scenarios available from climate change models. Data of the natural factors thought to be most important for the growth of sugar maples (surface temperature, precipitation, soil moisture, soil type, and slope) will be entered into the GIS model and will be ranked according to how much of an influence they have in sugar maple development and health. Results from the model will show the limits of the species growth in Ontario taking into account all of the natural factors and future climate projections at once. One of the major goals of this project is to develop maps that can be used to help syrup producers plan strategies to manage and cope with the effects of climate change.

 
 
 

Christopher Lander

email: clander@oceansltd.com


Research
I am working on the statistical downscaling of several locations across the Newfoundland and Labrador.

 
 
 

Tad Larsen

email: larsen.tad@epa.gov


Research
Developing tools to convert climate data to GIS

 
 
 

Frank La Sorte

email: frank.lasorte@yale.edu

I am currently a Postdoctoral Associate in the Jetz Lab at Yale University.


Research

I intend to use the NARCCAP data to achieve two research goals. First, assess our abilities and limitations for making reliable, broad-scale projections of spatial patterns of species abundance and occurrence under climate change for birds in North America. Second, building on these lessons make qualified projections of future species distributions of birds in North America given forecasted climate change. The proposed research will provide a novel large-scale assessment of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the ecological response to current climate change and will inform our understanding of current trends and aid in the parameterization of more refined and reliable future projections.

 
 
 

Zachary Lauffenburger

email: zachary@sfsu.edu

Graduate student at San Francisco State University.

Research
I'm researching future unsaturated water flow in the High Plains, USA based on GCM model parameters.

 
 
 

Alexandra Lavictoire

email: alavi005@uottawa.ca

Graduate Student of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Water Ressources University of Ottawa Research interest: Scour caused by hydraulic bore type waves

Research
I am conducting a project on evapotranspiration in Canada for a GIS course that I am taking at the University of Ottawa. I will be using climatic data (temperature, wind speed, solar radiation) in order to compute the reference evapotranspiration using various map layouts in GIS. The results of this project will hopefully provide maps for preferred crop lands.

 
 
 

Katie Lavigne

email: klavig2@lsu.edu

I am from New Orleans, LA. I recieved my undergraduate degree in Geography from Louisiana State University in May 2009. I am continuing on for my master's degree at LSU in physical geography with a focus in climate.


Research

I plan to do a future scenario water budget analysis for river systems in South Louisiana. I will use the output of climate change from NARCCAP as my input for the water budget model to predict future water budget changes.

 
 
 

Kaleen Lawsure

email: klawsure@odu.edu

Project Scientist
Virginia Modeling, Analysis & Simulation Center
1030 University Blvd.
Suffolk, VA 23435


Research

The goal of our proposed research is to develop an improved overarching computer model that will facilitate the prediction of health impacts of climate change at local, regional, and national levels. This model will assist in the evaluation of proposed policy changes and adaptation efforts that encompass biological, social, and political (policy-making) efforts. To these ends our research has the following objectives:

  1. Review the existing integrated assessment frameworks and improve upon these frameworks as necessary to develop an all encompassing conceptual model that will facilitate the achievement of the above goals.
  2. Implement the improved integrated assessment framework in a system dynamics model that will provide not only the causal connections among the various factors but also the computational backbone to implement the model in a fully functional simulation.
  3. Assess the qualitative factors that must be included in the above model since models that include political and social aspects often do not have hard quantitative data. The investigators have developed a methodology for measuring, mapping, and combining qualitative and quantitative data into models that provide accurate predictive capability.
  4. Identify one or more use cases (real-world examples) and perform Monte Carlo simulation analysis to assess model validity. This will also include sensitivity analysis to determine key factors influencing model outcome and allow for inclusion of variables with various degrees of uncertainty in a scientific manner.
  5. Enlist the aid of our research advisors and other subject matter experts to help judge the overall validity, usefulness, and predictive accuracy to prescribe adaptation, institutional and/or policy implementation to address global health issues and needs.

At a minimum our model will contain sub-models addressing disease biology, ecological constructs, and social behavior. We will identify a broad range of factors in each sub-model that will allow the entire system to scale from the local to the national level. Those factors not important at a specific level may be left out of a specific analysis. This concept will allow for the incorporation of various diseases or families of diseases that one may want to analyze for policy and adaptation scenarios.

A system dynamics modeling approach is most appropriate for this effort. System dynamics modeling allows for a concise mapping of factors that influence system behavior and the causal relationships that exist among those factors. This modeling paradigm also affords researchers and model users a way to visualize very complex systems in a straight forward manner. This aids in a better understanding of the system through both a holistic view of the system and the emergence of behaviors not intuitively obvious because of the limits of human cognition. The three sub-models indentified above (disease biology, ecological constructs, and social behavior) are clearly systems in themselves. Taking a system of systems approach to analyzing the relationships that exist among them will clearly enhance the understanding of the overall behavior of this very complex association.

A very important aspect of our proposal is the link between this model and the ability to evaluate other research efforts addressing specific policy and adaptation schemes. This model will afford the research community a means to test out in a scientific manner the results of their research. Modeling and simulation allows for manipulation of aspects of the real-world that cannot readily be changed. The model will also identify areas where insufficient data is available that can help set a future research agenda for health agencies around the world.

 
 
 

Brian Lazar

email: blazar@stratusconsulting.com
website: http://www.stratusconsulting.com

Brian Lazar is a senior scientist with Stratus Consulting and specializes in the characterization and mechanics of integrated hydrologic systems, using analytical techniques from engineering, physics, and hydrology. At Stratus Consulting, Mr. Lazar performs snowpack and hydrologic modeling and analysis, climate change impact assessments, and data research and analysis; and provides scientific litigation support. His work is concentrated in the areas of surface and groundwater hydrology, snowpack modeling, glaciology, and contaminant fate and transport. Mr. Lazar hold an MS in environmental/water resource engineering and a BS in environmental science, both from the University of Colorado, Boulder.


Research

We intend to use the NARCCAP data sets for climate change impacts analyses. We are typically using climate change projections for a region (e.g. coterminous U.S.) or a locale (e.g. Park City) and then answering questions like, "If these projections come to fruition, what would happen to...." My focus area looks at potential changes to snowpack, glaciers, and hydrologic systems. Others here at Stratus look at potential changes to ecological, biological, and even economic systems.

Some examples of these projects include:

  • impacts to snowpack for ski areas in the 21st century, and what this may mean for ski are operations and dependent economies
  • impacts to cold water fish species in the coterminous U.S.
  • implications for flood infrastructure and resiliency to extreme events in the U.S.
  • potential impacts for snowmelt runoff and timing in snowmelt driven water management districts

Methodology generally looks at a wide range of climate projections, considering a suite of GCMs and a range of SRES emissions scenarios in an effort to bracket future potential climatic outcomes. In order to obtain higher resolution projections, we use RCMs and statistical downscaling methods.

 
 
 

Jonathan Leblanc Tanguay

email: jlebl075@uottawa.ca

I am a second year master student at the Geography department of the University of Ottawa and my thesis project is on vulnerability assessment of two municipalities (located in Quebec province) to climate change. My thesis supervisor is Andr Viau (Associate Professor and member of the Laboratory for Paleoclimatology and Climatology (LPC)).

Research
I am a student at the Geography department of the University of Ottawa and my thesis project is on vulnerability assessment of two municipalities (located in Quebec province) to climate change.

The first objective of my research is to evaluate current vulnerabilities based on local perception. The second part of my work is to assess future vulnerabilities of those municipalities to Climate Change based on regional climate simulation and local perception of those scenarios.

Where I need to used NARCCAP data is in the second step of my research. I need free and simple model with temperature (min and max) and total precipitation variables to map scenarios (2030, 2050, 2080) in ArcGIS 9 (version 9.3.1)and which I can download as NetCDF file.

The goal of this work is an article underlining the main vulnerabilities of the city of Mont-Laurier and the municipality of Ferme-Neuve to climate change based on local perception and climate change scenarios (bottom up and top down approaches).

 
 
 

Martin Leduc

email: leduc@sca.uqam.ca
website: http://www.mrcc.uqam.ca/etudiant.php?pkMembre=24

PhD student at the Canadian Network for Regional Climate Modelling and Diagnostics (CRCMD, UQAM@Ouranos)


Research

The general goal of my doctoral research is to characterize the uncertainty due to the structural differences between climate models when assessing regional projections of climate change over North America. Within the context of a multi-model ensemble such as NARCCAP that uses a few AOGCMs to drive different RCMs, both model types add their own contribution to the total uncertainty of the projections, as do the two others well known sources: the range of the GHG emission scenarios and the internal variability related to the AOGCM.

It is important to quantify the relative contributions in uncertainty of the two types of models since it is not well understood yet what is the optimal ratio of investment between the number of RCMs and AOGCMs that should be used within a multi-model experiment. In order to extend the rather small sample of AOGCMs that takes part to the NARCCAP experiment, the CMIP3 multimodel dataset (23 AOGCMs) will be used. The sampling of the AOGCMs and RCMs used in NARCCAP will be evaluated by comparing the regional characteristics of the uncertainty against the CMIP3 large sample. Comparison will be done over a common domain (North America) and climate periods (1971-2000 and 2041-2070), especially for surface temperature and precipitation fields.

 
 
 

Huikyo Lee

email: midatm123@naver.com

I am currently a Postdoctoral scalar at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Research
I would like to evaluate the multi-RCM results from NARCCAP hindcast experiment using the Regional Climate Modeling Evaluation System (RCMES). For model evaluation, RCMES uses multiple satellite and ground observations. Also cross validation between NARCCAP and CMIP5 results will be conducted. My main interest is in the relationship between the model errors in simulating precipitation and radiation fields. Some preliminary results suggest that the RCM biases in precipitation and radiation are related via cloud fields.

 
 
 

Sangchul Lee

email: slee1224@umd.edu

I'm a Ph.d course student at the department of geographical sciences at the university of Maryland.

Research
My interest is wetland functions, especially nutrient removals. In addition, the impact of climate change on hydrology at multiple scale attracts my interest. The empirical and modeling methods are considered to use my study. Future climate data are applied to hydrology model to predict future water condition depending on the changes in temperature or precipitation.

 
 
 

Temple Lee

email: trl2y@virginia.edu

Temple R. Lee is a third-year graduate student at the University of Virginia studying mountain meteorology, focusing on downscaling methods of climate models in mountainous areas.


Research

Our research focuses on how to downscale climate models to complex terrain to understand how the habitats of sensitive species will be affected by a changing climate, with a specific focus on the central Appalachian Mountains. The first stage of our research is to compare historic meteorological measurements with NARCCAP to assess the model's performance in the region of interest. The next stage will be to integrate in-situ observations, including those obtained from a micrometeorological tower and network of temperature sensors along mountain slopes, with both high-resolution meteorological models, including PRISM and WRF, and regional climate model output from NARCCAP.

 
 
 

William Leeds

email: leedsw@uchicago.edu

I am currently a postdoc in the Department of Statistics and the Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, working for the Center for Robust Decision Making in Climate and Energy Policy (RDCEP). In July 2012, I graduated with my PhD in statistics at the University of Missouri.

Research
My research interests lie in spatio-temporal statistical modeling. I am interested in using NARCCAP data for the purposes of assessing changes in spatial and temporal variability as a result of C02 emissions (as shown in GCMs and RCMS) and the development of tools for conditional simulation that take into account these changing sources of variability.

 
 
 

Eric Leibensperger

email: eleib003@plattsburgh.edu
website: http://facweb.plattsburgh.edu/eric.leibensperger/

Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
SUNY Plattsburgh
Plattsburgh, NY 12901


Research

I will use the NARCCAP data to investigate impacts in the northeastern US, particularly upstate NY and VT. I will also investigate changes in air pollution meteorology.

 
 
 

Chris Lennard

email: lennard@csag.uct.ac.za

I'm a downscaler co-ordinating the Cordex-Africa analysis campaign working at the Climate System Analysis Group at University of Cape Town. I"m interested in techniques that deal with multi-model, multi-downscaling method, large-ensemble climate data.

Research
I am interested in the analysis techniques utilized by NARCCAPto analyze data during the project. I'll use NARCCAP to assess potential transferability to the Cordex-Africa work. The significance lies in building capacity of Africa scientists to correctly and robustly analyze and interpret climate data.

 
 
 

John Lenters

email: jlenters2@unl.edu

Associate Professor
University of Nebraska - Lincoln
School of Natural Resources
723 Hardin Hall
Lincoln, NE 68583-0987

Phone: 402-304-0166 Fax: 402-472-2946


Research

We would like to use the NARCCAP data to assess the impacts of climate variability and change on water resources in the U.S. Upper Midwest. Our goals are to understand how the regional water balance (e.g., evapotranspiration, runoff, soil moisture, etc.) has changed in response to historical changes in temperature and precipitation, as well as how it may change in response to future climate change. Our methods are to use the NARCCAP data as drivers for a land surface hydrologic model, and we will primarily be using inputs of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, and radiation. We anticipate that the results of this work will be of significance for current and future water resource management in the Upper Midwest.

 
 
 

Jean Lerner

email: jal136@columbia.edu

Jean Lerner is a scientific programmer working with Radley Horton, Alex Ruane, and Cynthia Rosenzweig at Columbia University and NASA/GISS.


Research

The Climate Impacts Group at NASA GISS is interested in NARCCAP output for several potential applications:

  1. Drive further downscaling with the WRF-ARW model to the metropolitan level
  2. Directly drive impact assessment models (of agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and/or water resource management)
  3. Examine the sensitivity of large-scale circulation patterns to climate scenarios
  4. Determine the statistics of extreme events in participating models
  5. Evaluate the ensemble and member statistics to determine whether NARCCAP-like projects are justified for climate impact assessments in other regions of the world.
Of primary initial interest is the downscaled 20th Century climate scenario, followed by the A1B scenarios in the mid 21st Century.

 
 
 

Ofir Levy

email: levyofi@gmail.com
website: http://www.earthsystemgrid.org/myopenid/levyofi

Post-Doctoral Fellow, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287

Research
Models of population dynamics have been used to infer the impacts of climate change on the distributions of species. The predictions of these models depend greatly on parameters that characterize the phenotype and the environment. Most of current the studies assume a uniform warming of 3 degrees C, which represents a moderate scenario for the next century. I will use NARCCAP data to parametrize a model with a non-uniform temperature increase. I believe that this approach will improve our predictions on climate change outcomes.

 
 
 

Guilong Li

email: Guilong.Li@ec.gc.ca

I am climate analyst in Envrionment Canada. My research interests are climate change impact and adaptation at regional scale. My group focuses more on temperature and precipitation change in Canada and the impact for Canada environment, such as heat, heavy rainfall, etc.


Research

NARCCAP data provide very high resolution outputs for our study. Our research goals are trying to analyze the temperature and precipitation change impact to Canada environment at regional scale. Different statistical methods will be used to analyze the extreme values, such as heat wave, heavy rainfall etc. The research results will be published on different journals.

 
 
 

Jialun Li

email: jialun@coral.eng.uci.edu

I am in the University of California at Irvine. My interest is to investigate the potential effects of human activities on regional/local hydroclimate.

Research
Using NARCCAP data, further downscaled data as well as ground and remote-sensing data to investigate snow hydrology over the watersheds in the U.S. Mountains under climate changes.

 
 
 

Xuan Li

email: xuanli@email.unc.edu

I am a Phd student from statistics department of UNC Chapel Hill. I am working with Prof. Richard Smith on the ensembles of climate models. I am also a member of the Spatial Extremes working group at SAMSI.


Research

I am working with Prof. Richard Smith on a Bayesian method to combine different climate model into a posterior distribution. We want to extend our analysis using the Regional Climate Model data.

Details on the Bayesian method can be found in the paper: Bayesian Modeling of Uncertainty in Ensembles of Climate Models, by R.L. Smith, C. Tebaldi, D. Nychka and L.O. Mearns. JASA, 2009

We extend the method a little bit to include more completed data set. Also we are applying the analysis on North Carolina temperature data. One concern is that the resolution for global climate models are rather coarse so that the projections may be rough. We want to use the Reginol Climate Model data in our analysis and hope to get some better results.

 
 
 

Yinpeng Li

email: yinpengl@waikato.ac.nz

The International Global Change Institute, The University of Waikato, New Zealand.

Research interests: Climate change impact integrated assessment modelling, risk assessment; regional climate change projections.


Research

The aims of using NARCCAP data:

  1. Comparing the extreme precipitation simulations of RCMs and GCMs under climate change scenarios
  2. Comparing the performance of downscaling methods in regional and local precipitation projection
  3. Exploring the applicability of pattern scaling approach by using RCM data.

This reseach will be helpful for developing more reliable regional climate change projections.

 
 
 

Xin-Zhong Liang

email: xliang@illinois.edu

I am currently a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Starting in January 2011, I will join the University of Maryland, College Park, as a professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center.

My research focus is on development and application of regional and global climate model. In particular, I have led the development of the Climate extension of the Weather Research and Forcasting model (CWRF). I also extensive experience in regional climate modle downscaling of climate prediction and climate change projection.


Research

I plan to use the NARCCAP data for evaluation of CWRF for the present climate as driven by the NCEP/DOE reanalysis. The intercomparison among RCMs will help identify climate biases that are either common to all models or specific to CWRF. This will facilitate further model improvement.

 
 
 

Erik Lilleskov

email: elilleskov@fs.fed.us
website: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/Lilleskov

Research Ecologist
USDA Forest Service
Northern Research Station
401 MacInnes Dr
Houghton, MI
Tel. 906-482-6303


Research

We are establishing an experiment to examine the consequences of climate change in the Upper Great Lakes region for peatland carbon and methane cycling, examining interactions with dominant peatland plant communities, especially the role of the Ericaceae. We have large ~1m3 mesocosms into which we are placing living peatland monoliths. We will manipulate the water balance of these systems to reflect the range of future climate scenarios, and manipulate the plant communities to partition direct effects of climate on C and methane cycling from those of the plant community. We will use data from NARCCAP as the basis for future climate scenarios to be examined in the mesocosm experiments. We anticipate that there will be significant interactions between climate and vegetation treatments in their impact on C and methane fluxes. Results of this study will help us develop more realistic models of the feedbacks between climate change, peatland vegetation communities, and C and trace gas cycling.

 
 
 

John Lin

email: jcl@uwaterloo.ca
website: http://www.earth.uwaterloo.ca/~jcl/


Research

We plan on using NARCCAP data in order to study the climate system over the province of Ontario, in Canada. Southern Ontario is the region of Canada with the highest population density, and if current trends hold, will continue to experience population growth over the upcoming decades. With such growth is potential stress on agricultural systems and water resources. Hence it is important to understand if and how climate will change in this region.

APPROACH: The main tool used for this work will be the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF will be run at high resolution over southern Ontario for several decades.

DATA: The NARCCAP data will be used for two main purposes:
(a) The model output serves as boundary conditions with which to drive inner nests of the WRF modelled, centered over southern Ontario. This allows climate simulations to be dynamically downscaled over the region of interest
(b) The ensemble of model output would be used to investigate model-derived uncertainties in climate projections. The ensemble of model boundary conditions could be used to drive another ensemble of WRF setups to derive a larger ensemble of model outputs.

Environment Canada maintains a network of surface monitoring sites that measures standard meteorological variables such as temperature, windspeed, wind direction, and precipitation. These data would be used to evaluate the WRF (and potentially NARCCAP) models when they are run in hindcast mode.

ANTICIPATED FINDINGS:

  • Projected changes in temperature
  • Projected changes in water resource-related variables (e.g., precipitation, runoff)
  • Error bars in such projections constructed using the ensemble approach

 
 
 

Xiaomao Lin

email: xlin2@unl.edu

I am working at the school of natural resources as atmospheric scientist. I have been working on the applied climate community over last ten years in the University of Nebraksa-Lincoln.

Contact Information:
Xiaomao Lin
310 Hardin Hall
School of Natural Resoruces
Unviersity of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE 68583
Tel: 402-472-8185


Research

My working areas are associated with climate change detection and attribution especially in observed climatology. I am also interesting in projected climate datasets. Data processing and analysis are of my interests.

Currently we are conducting a study about the Nebraska's climate change including the projections with a relatively high-resolution dataset. Therefore, we feel that the NARCCAP dataset would be a helpful resource for us to finish up our curent task.

 
 
 

Ernst Linder

email: elinder@unh.edu

I am a statistics professor at the U. of New Hampshire. I have been at UNH for 23 years. I received my Ph.D. at Penn State. Areas of interests are: Environmental Statistics, Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Statistics, Bayesian Statistics, Climate Change Research, Vector-borne Disease Ecology.


Research

I am participating in an interdisciplinary research group on climate change downscaling and impact assessment. I am collaborating with earth system scientists and civil engineers. Our specific goals are:
1) Use of RCM output to drive hydrological water-balance models and related uncertainty quantification for use in flood prediction
2) Use of RCM output to drive engineering infrastructure model, such as for road pavement, bridge scouring, etc, and related uncertainty quantification.
Initially we are interested in model outputs for the New England Region only. For 1) daily outputs are sufficient, for 2) 3-hourly outputs are desired.

 
 
 

Chaoshun Liu

email: liuchaoshun@126.com

Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science, Ministry of Education
Department of Geography
East China Normal University


Research

Climate change impacts on ecosystems

 
 
 

Jinliang (John) Liu

email: Jinliang.Liu@Ontario.Ca

Senior Science Advisor on Climate Change
Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Branch
Environmental Sciences and Standards Division
Ontario Ministry of the Environment
Canada

Adjunct Professor, Department of Earth and Engineering Sciences, York University


Research

Our research has been trying to produce/refine high resolution regional climate and climate change information based on the best available GCM and RCM outputs in support of the provincial government's policy development regarding climate change adaptation strategies.

Current Research topics:

  • High resolution regional climate modelling / dynamical downscaling
  • High resolution probabilistic projections using available GCM and RCM outputs
  • Extremes analysis via combined downscaling: temperature, precipitation, winds and other derived variables such as heat waves, degree days and IDF curves, etc.
 
 
 

Ping Liu

email: pliu@notes.cc.sunysb.edu

Research Assistant Professor
Endeavor Hall #199
School of Atmospheric and Marine Sciences
State University of New York at Stony Brook
Stony Brook, 11794-5000 NY


Research

We will use the NARCCAP data to investigate the climate change in the Northeast of US, focusing on the greater New York City and Long Island. The model-downscaled historical change will be compared with global reanalysis products and observations for 1) constructing statistical model(s) between the regional change and large-scale atmospheric circulations, 2) attributing the changes to either natural fluctuations or anthropogenic effects, and 3) investigating the systematic biases over these areas in both the global and regional models used to produce the data sets. Based on the acknowledge in historical change, we will continue to project the changes over these areas with the greenhouse gas emission scenarios, to understand the uncertainties, to attribute and to mitigate the changes.

 
 
 

Tingting Liu

email: gnuliutingting@gmail.com

I am a graduate student at URI working on Ecosystem Services in the urban fringe of Southern New England.


Research

In our research, we will forecast changes in the ecosystem services based on future climate trends and land use change in Rhode Island. We need the climate change model to get the temperature and precipitation data in the coming 50 years. Data from these climate change models or scenarios will be used as inputs to the SWAT model to forecast the impacts on water quantity and quality as well as crop and timber yields. We also will examine the likely changes in the ecosystem services based on forecasts of land use change in the region.

 
 
 

Yongqiang Liu

email: yliu@fs.fed.us

My research at the Center for Forest Disturbance Science, US Forest Service, is focused on climate-forest ecosystem interactions. It is aimed at understanding forest disturbances (abnormal water conditions, wildfire, and land cover change), the relationships to climate variability and climate change, and the environmental consequences. The combined approach of numerical modeing, theoretical and statistical analyses, and field measurements is used to investigate the processes, mechanisms, and impacts of the disturbances and to develop evaluation and prediction techniques. The research is expected to help strategy development and implementation to reduce forest vulnerability to forest disturbances and their adverse environmental impacts.


Research

Main research goal: To understand interactions and feedbacks between regional climate and forest ecosystem disturbances (wildfire, water stress, deforestation/afforestation, etc.).

Research Methods: To estimate forest disturbance indices such as the Keetch-Byram Drought Index for wildfire using the climate information provided by the NARCCAP, to project future trends in forest disturbances using the projected climate provided by the NCACCAP, and to investigate the feedbacks of forest disturbances to regional climate and hydrology by conducting additional regional climate modeling.

Research Plan: The research will be conducted at the US Forest Service's Center for Forest Disturbance Science located at Athens, Georgia. The studies are planned for a period of 2 to 3 years.

Data needed: The current and future temperature, precipitation and other outputs provided by NCACCAP. The targeted model combination is WRF-CCSM.

Anticipated findings /significance: Climate is a major factor for many forest disturbances such as wildfire. Global climate models have projected overall warming and drying trends in many mid-latitude regions by the end of this century due to the greenhouse effect, suggesting significant future changes in forest disturbances. A recent study identified a number of global regions, including North America, where wildfires are expected to increase resulted from the projected climate change. This study conducts a further analysis of spatial patterns of future fire potential and other forest disturbances in the North America.

 
 
 

Paul Loikith

email: paul.c.loikith@jpl.nasa.gov

I am a California Institute of Technology Postdoc at the Jet Propulsion Lab working on the Regional Climate Model Evaluation System with Duane Waliser. I recently got my PhD from Rutgers University.

Research
We will be evaluating NARCCAP data using NASA observations as part of JPL's Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES).

 
 
 

Liu Long

email: 492843233@qq.com

I am a Chinese student studying hydrodynamics using the Princeton ocean model


Research

I need wind data to model tides during extratropical cyclones.

 
 
 

Ross Loomis

email: rloomis@rti.org

Economist at RTI International

Research
Economic Impacts of Climate Change

 
 
 

Ronald Lowther

email: ronald.lowther@ngc.com

Northrop Grumman Corporation

Dr. Ron Lowther is an accomplished executive, manager, and scientist leading highly successful organizations with a strong portfolio of success. He has over 25 years in facets of industry, defense, and academics with expertise in atmospheric science, environmental engineering, climate services, risk management, and academic administration with supervisory and staffing oversight.

Currently, an Environmental Advanced Systems Manager for Northrop Grumman Mission Systems, Dr. Lowther manages several programs and is responsible for providing overall planning and long-term positioning of the company's global environmental and climate initiatives.

Before coming to Northrop Grumman in 2008, Dr. Lowther was the Director of Air and Space Science for the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). Technically, he propelled the first fine-scale weather prediction model in over a decade to operational status. Lowther coordinated 15-year modeling plans with milestones and decision points which addressed terrestrial, near space, and space weather areas in the near-, mid-, and long-term periods providing clear 4-D weather visions and roadmaps for the Department of Defense and its research partners. In addition, he led global online training of weather risk management tools to allow the exploitation and use of stochastic predictions.

From 2000-2005, Dr. Lowther was Director of Outreach Programs at the Air Force Institute of Technology, as well as, Deputy Department Head for the multi-disciplinary Engineering Physics Department. As Director of Outreach Programs for the Institute, Dr. Lowther established graduate distance learning programs in Systems Engineering at DOD installations and cooperative transfer agreements with nearby large universities.

Prior to 2000, Dr. Lowther was Chief Scientist for the Air Force Climatology Center located in the Federal Climate Complex in Asheville, NC. Previous to that he held the position of Department of Defense Climatologist in Washington D.C.

Dr. Lowther has demonstrated leadership in implementing cooperative agreements among Federal agencies and universities with a strong record of commitment to interdisciplinary and diverse programs: atmospheric science, data exploitation, environmental and systems engineering, climate modeling, space weather, and remote sensing. He is reputable for elevating organizations to top-performing and revenue-generating entities with multiple prestigious career awards.


Research

My research focuses on functional areas that provide the research, analysis, science, and modeling capability to deliver forecasts and other high fidelity, high resolution output from global climate model predictions downscaled for regional and local use. These functional areas analyze and model climate variability and impacts occurring on the regional levels, and provide high-resolution model predictions. The high-resolution products are also validated using historical observations and re-analysis data. The increased spatial resolution is examined for its support of regional needs in areas requiring decisions and solutions by local policy and decision makers. My work also looks at adapting, developing, and validating decision support models and products for regions. The computational tools required to support these analyses and modeling functions are coordinated with community members to ensure repeatable results and conformity to standards and interfaces.

 
 
 

Eric Lu

email: elu@iastate.edu
website: http://climate.agron.iastate.edu/ResearchTeam/LuEric.html

I am a research associate at the Agronomy Department of Iowa State University. My research interests include understanding the atmospheric and land processes involved in the relationships among temperature, water vapor, precipitation, streamflow and other hydrological components.


Research

The NARCCAP data I will use is for the assessment of the hydrological impact of the climate change in the Upper Mississippi River Basin with the hydrological model SWAT. The purpose of this work is to make clear whether the meteorological data provided by the different global models downscaled by the different regional models can lead to satisfied simulation of the hydrological cycle, how the hydrological cycle will change with the warming climate, and how to understand the contributions of temperature and precipitation to the interannual variability and long-term change of the hydrological cycle.

 
 
 

Charlotte Lunday

email: charlottelunday@ou.edu

I'm an undergraduate meteorology student at the University of Oklahoma, and I work at the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. I'm interested in analyzing climate model data with respect to variables of importance to people of Oklahoma.

Research
Using NARCCAP data, I aim to analyze how good of a fit the output of dynamic downscaling of regional climate models compares to observations taken by the Oklahoma Mesonet. Beginning with a qualitative comparison of precipitation, my goal is to expand the project on to other climate variables in the future, and perhaps also compare Mesonet data to statistically downscaled models. Ultimately, I intend to find methods and model that best fit Oklahoma and the needs of stakeholders.

 
 
 

Taras Lychuk

email: taras.lychuk@agr.gc.ca

I am a Postdoctoral Researcher with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Brandon, Manitoba. I received my Ph.D. degree from the University of Maryland, College Park, USA majoring in Soil Science and Watershed Management. I am using NARCCAP data for regional simulations with the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model to understand the impacts of changing climate on trends in yield, changes in soil properties and nutrient dynamics in Canadian Prairies. These simulation results will serve as the basis to design any necessary adaptation strategies to maintain/improve yields and environmental quality in the region.


Research

The NARRCAP data will be used by scientists from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) research centres in Brandon, MB and Saskatoon, SK to simulate the impacts of climate change on targeted soil processes, nutrient and yield dynamics on the soils in the Canadian prairies region of Central/Western Canada. NARCCAP future climate data (CRCM, HRM3, and RCM3 driven by CCSM, CGCM3, and GFDL) will be used to test climate change impacts on a set of response variables from long-term field experiments by comparing historical and future responses.

Long-term field experiments have been established in Scott, SK and Carberry, MB.

The study in Scott, SK was initiated in 1994 with the goal to understand the role of inputs and cropping diversity in sustaining crop production and soil quality and preserving biodiversity of the Canadian prairies region (Lemke et al., 2012). For the past years, scientists from AAFC have been investigating and comparing the long-term economic, agronomic, and environmental performance of nine cropping systems, which in general way represent the spectrum of cropping systems found on the Canadian prairies (Lemke et al., 2012). The typical nine cropping systems were made by combination of the three input levels (1) organic (2) reduced and (3) conventional and three levels of crop diversity (1) cereal monoculture (2) cereal and broadleaf crops and (3) both annual and perennial crops. Historical long-term field data exist on the impacts of these typical nine cropping systems on the following response variables:

  • Accumulation and distribution of nitrate-N and extractable P in soil profile
  • Soil pH
  • Dry aggregation
  • Organic C and N
  • Yield
  • Soil arthropods populations

NARRCAP future climate data from 2041 to 2070 will be used to test the impacts of climate changes on the above response variables at Scott, SK by comparing historical long-term field response data with future response data. In addition, economic analyses will be performed to quantify the impacts of climate change on economic return.

The study at Carberry, MB was established in 1998 and monitored for twelve years to determine effects of six rotations on potato yield and quality. The six rotations were (1) potato with canola (2) potato-wheat (3) potato-canola-wheat (4) potato-oat-wheat (5) potato-wheat-canola-wheat and (6) potato-canola-alfalfa-alfalfa. Historical long-term yield from this study will be compared with future yield utilizing future climate data provided by NARCCAP.

Appropriate statistical analyses will be performed involving ANOVA, ANCOVA, time series and partition analysis.

The high-resolution regional modeling simulations will be performed with the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model. EPIC model will be updated with daily NARRCAP future weather data. EPIC is a widely tested model originally built to quantify the effects of soil erosion and agricultural productivity (Williams, 1995). EPIC operates on a daily time step and can perform long-term simulations on watersheds up to 100 ha. Since its inception, the EPIC model has evolved into a comprehensive agro-ecosystem model. Among a variety of available simulation models, EPIC has proven to be one of the most reliable in its accuracy to predict crop/biomass production, changes in soil properties and nutrient balances based on climatic, soil, operational management, and other relevant data (Izaurralde et al., 2003; Thomson et al., 2005).

Performing simulations with EPIC model updated with future climate data from NARRCAP will allow us to understand the future trends in yield, changes in soil properties and nutrient dynamics in Canadian Prairies. These simulation results will also serve as the basis to design any necessary adaptation strategies to maintain/improve yields and environmental quality in the region.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Marc Macias Fauria

email: marc.maciasfauria@zoo.ox.ac.uk
website: http://oxlel.zoo.ox.ac.uk/dr-marc-macias-fauria

I am a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Oxford (U.K.).

Research
I study the coupling between the physical world (geology, climate) and ecological systems. I plan to use the data from NARCCAP on a study of treeline dynamics in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. This research is being performed in cooperation with the University of Calgary, Canada.

 
 
 

Johannes Mack

email: jmack13@siu.edu

I am a graduate research assistant at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. I am the research assistant for Dr. Justin T. Schoof in the department of Geography and Environmental Resources. My personal research interests include the polar regions and more specifically how changes in snow and sea ice are influencing the phase of climate oscillations whose centers of action are near the Arctic.

Research
As a research assistant for Dr. Justin T. Schoof, I was asked to create a account so that I could start downloading data for Dr. Schoof's research project. Dr. Schoof and his research group are interested in seeing how cyclone tracks will alter and change regional wind climates within different future climate scenarios. Having an account will help the research process for Dr. Schoof and his research group since I can download the data he needs instead of him having to do it himself.

 
 
 

Ross MacKay

email: ross.mackay@ec.gc.ca
website: http://www.ec.gc.ca/INRE-NWRI

National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Saskatoon

Research

Our main research goal is comparing NARCCAP regional data with station data, reanalysis results, gridded observed datasets and future climate scenarios for hydrologic studies.

Our plan is to work with the data (RCM, gridded observed, station data) over the Lake Winnipeg Drainage Basin to see how well the RCMs replicate recent climate (1971-2000) at various spatial and temporal scales with respect to temperature, precipitation, and possibly some circulation variables using correlations, means, extremes, and rmse.

 
 
 

Victor Magaña

email: victormr@servidor.unam.mx

National Autonomous University of Mexico
Mexico City 04510
victormr@servidor.unam.mx

Ph.D from the University of California Los Angeles

Currently at the National Autonomoius University of Mexico


Research

Man interests on dynamics of climate in the Mexico, Central America and Caribbean region, and the use of climate information to reduce vulnerability on various socioeconomic sectors, including adaptation to climate change.

As part of the official plans of the Mexican government to respond to the challenge on Climate Change, there is a need to formulate adaptation plans at the state level. This requires downscaling climate change scenarios to the state level, and at times at the basin level, since the water sector is one of those considered as a priority in the adaptation process.

Members of the Tropical Meteorology group at the National University of Mexico have explored various venues on how to downscale GCM output and on how to consider the climate statistics to properly manage risk of climate change at the regional level. The most important lines of research include the use of statistical tools to downscale GCM climate change scenarios used for the IPCC AR4. There are two basic developments: 1) the statistical downscaling model, known as SDSM, to construct local climate change scenarios, and 2) the use of the Climate Predictability Tool (CPT) developed at the IRI to downscale monthly conditions using GCM output. Results from the CPT have been compared with output from mesoscale models as PRECIS from the Hadley Center and the Earth Simulator from the Meteorological Research Institute for the domain of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

At present, we are coupling a stochastic weather generator to explore changes in extreme events under climate change and compare with observational analyses of trends in severe storms and drought for the last one hundred years in Mexico.

 
 
 

Ben Mansour Maher

email: maher@sca.uqam.ca

I am a master's student at UQAM


Research

Evaluate climate change impacts on three spring flood characteristics (i.e., flood peak, volume, and duration) within a multivariate framework, for 21 northeast Canadian basins covering Québec and some parts of the adjoining Ontario and Newfoundland provinces of Canada

 
 
 

Kelly Mahoney

email: kelly.mahoney@noaa.gov

I am a UCAR postdoctoral fellow through the PACE (Postdocs Applying Climate Expertise) program. I am working with NOAA and the US Bureau of Reclamation to examine extreme precipitation events in the western US.


Research

To examine the potential for changes in warm season extreme precipitation events across the western US in future climates, I plan to use the WRF model to conduct higher-resolution simulations of a small set of extreme events. To do so, I would like to utilize the NARCAAP dataset as both a resource to assess future scenario possibilities, as well as potential initial conditions for future simulations.

 
 
 

Charles Malenfant

email: c_malenfant@hotmail.ca

I am a student at Laval University, in Quebec (Qc, Canada). At the end of the summer, I will start my third year in the Baccalaureat en Genie des eaux (Water Engineering). I am now halfway in my studies.

For many years, I have had a special interest in all what concerns global warming, especially the works from IPCC. For this summer (2012), I am doing a student internship within Ouranos.


Research
During my student internship within Ouranos, I will continue the acquisition of data, mostly for the variables linked to hydrology processes.
More specifically, my tasks will be:
-Download the data and standardize it into Ouranos' format, in order to facilitate its use in Ouranos projects.
-Get the information about regional cliimate models (RCM) concerned by NARCCAP experience, with an emphasis on variables linked to land surface hydrology.
-Map these data with Matlab.

 
 
 

Benjamin Mandel

email: BHMandel@lbl.gov

I am a Graduate Student at UC-Berkeley, pursuing a joint Masters in Public Policy (MPP) and Energy and Resources (MS). I also work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a Graduate Student Research Assistant.

Research
Working with researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in collaboration with Dr. Laurence Kalkstein of the University of Miami to project heat-related deaths from extreme heat events under various climate change scenarios over the next three decades. The results of the model can go into climate adaptation and preparedness planning for US cities.

 
 
 

Samantha Mann

email: samij07@hotmail.com

GIS Contractor
Northern Research Station
Grand Rapids, MN


Research

Research Goals: Determine the effects of climate change on forest productivity and carbon cycling in Northeastern US

Methods: Combine knowledge of current forest types and distribution, geographic variables and future climate scenarios to forecast potential changes in forest ecosystem health and carbon storage capacity

Research Plan:

  1. map current distribution of forest types using remotely sensed imagery
  2. estimate and validate current productivity from FIA data
  3. incorporate predicted climate variables to simulate future productivity
  4. apply insight gained from research to forest management plans and distribute research process/findings to promote environmental awareness

Data needed: Predicted future climate conditions for Northern Great Lakes region

Anticipated findings / significance: This research will address the potential impacts of climate change on the distribution, health and carbon storage capacity of Lake States forests and disperse the research process and findings to generate increased ecological understanding via collaboration with regional school programs.

 
 
 

Daniel Margolis

email: dmargol1@gmail.com

I received my PhD in Systems Science from Binghamton University, and I am currently employed as Predictive Analytics Scientist on a Geospatial Analytics team.


Research

I want to assess the value of NARCCAP data in my environmental models.

 
 
 

Peter Marinescu

email: Peter.marinescu@gmail.com

I am currently a student at Stony Brook University in New York. I am working towards a MS in atmospheric science.

Research
I am working with a professor at Stony Brook University, working on a climatology for various atmospheric variables (i.e. wind, temperature, pressure). We may try to validate a regional climate model, with this data as well. Currently, my research is still open-ended, and hopefully with this data, I can narrow down on my research goals and methods.

 
 
 

Andre Marquez

email: andremar@hawaii.edu

Oceanographer at University of Sao Paulo (USP) (2006)
MSc. in Geological Oceanography at USP(2008)
MSc. in Coastal and Harbours Engineering at Universidad de Cantabria (Spain)(2009)
PhD Candidate at National Institute for Space Research (INPE)(2010-present)
Visiting research Scholar at University of Hawaii (2012-present)


Research

Dynamical Downscaling using CMIP5 and CMIP3 data for the Hawaiian Islands. Our bigger interests base on temperature, surface wind specific humidity and rainfall over the islands. Using WRF model to perform the dynamical downscaling we want to better understand the effects of the climate changes over the island.

 
 
 

Patrick Marsh

email: patrick.marsh@ou.edu

Graduate Student University of Oklahoma

Research
A significant question of climate change predictions is what will happen to severe convective weather. While the resolution of GCMs (in particular, the CCSM) and NARCCAP is greater than the resolution necessary to explicitly resolve convection, it should be high enough to resolve the mesoscale environments typically associated with severe convective weather. Previous studies have shown that regions with high CAPE and high 0-6 kilometer shear are favorable for the development of severe convective weather. I propose to build climatologies of parameters that have been shown sufficient for the development of severe convection. These parameters include, but are not limited to, CAPE, 0-6 kilometer shear, the product of CAPE and 0-6 kilometer shear, lapse rates, and low-level moisture content. This will further work done by Brooks et al. involving the NCEP / NCAR Global Reanalysis and work done by Marsh et al. involving the CCSM3. Results will allow for more concrete statements regarding the effect climate change will have on the frequency and distribution of severe convective weather.

 
 
 

Margaret Massie

email: Margaret.massie@oregonstate.edu

Oregon State University

Research
Natural areas are tracts of land with little or no evidence of past human influence and set aside for research, education, and conservation purposes. There are currently over 500 natural areas in Oregon and Washington managed by 20 federal, state, local, and private agencies and organizations. The natural areas network is unparalleled in its representation of the diverse ecosystems found in the region and may be the best collection of sites for monitoring long-term responses to climate change. However, many sites were designated based on their representation of plant association groups. The extent to which they characterize other environmental conditions or gradients important for measuring and understanding the effects of climate change has never been examined. The goal of my study is to develop a comprehensive climate change monitoring program for natural areas. A monitoring program based on these analyses could result in both a better understanding of the effects of climate change as well as lead to management approaches that consider both site- and region-specific responses to climate change over the long term.

 
 
 

Mohammad Masud

email: badal_203@yahoo.com

Graduate Researcher
Global Institute for Water Security and
School of Environment and Sustainability
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Canada


Research

In the past, various multi-year droughts have been observed in the Canadian Prairies that impacted agriculture, energy and socio-economic sectors. Therefore, proper understanding of the spatial and temporal characteristics of historical as well as future droughts is important for many water resources planning and management related activities across the region. Hence, NARCCAP data (daily max and min temperature, daily precipitation) will be used in order to see the drought characteristics by using conventional uni-variate and multi-variate frequency analyses.

 
 
 

Guillaume Mauger

email: gmauger@uw.edu
website: http://mauger.org/guillaume/

I am a climate scientist focusing on climate change impacts. I work at the Climate Impacts Group at UW Seattle.


Research

I frequently use statistically downscaled data to asseess climate impacts. I would like to compare the results of statistical downcaling to an ensemble of dynamically downscaled model results.

 
 
 

Rachindra Mawalagedara

email: rac_mw@yahoo.com


Research

I am interested in studying regional climate change using NARCCAP data. My study will focus mainly on the changes in, both mean and extreme, precipitation and temperature in Northeast USA. The potential impacts due to climate change, on sectors such as infrastructures and transport, will also be evaluated.

 
 
 

Eugenia Maya

email: mayam.maru@gmail.com

I am in the last grade of Master in Hydraulic by the University of Mexico

Research
Working with research of ocean data and atmosphere. All data will be applied into a model of future prediction in which is calculate if rain is little or much,in the regions of the country of Mexico

 
 
 

Ripley McCoy

email: ripley.mccoy@aggiemail.usu.edu

I am a Ph.D. student at Utah State University working in regional climate (and paleoclimate) modeling with WRF.


Research

I am using the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) version 3.0 coupled with Community Land Model (CLM) version 3.5 to study climate over the western United States. I am particularly interested in using NARCCAP data to compare winter high elevation precipitation (snowfall as well) and temperature with output from our coupled WRF-CLM model. I will determine what improvements have been made and what small scale processes are responsible.

 
 
 

Sonali McDermid

email: sps2113@columbia.edu


Research
I am a NASA Post-doctoral researcher working at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. We are interested in using NARCCAP data to help evaluate the impact of regional climate change in the northeastern USA on the region's ability to support agriculture - a so-called "foodshed". Using NARCCAP output/data, we will assess how the foodshed has been, and perhaps will be, impacted by climatic change/warming over time.

 
 
 

Todd McDonnell

email: todd.mcdonnell@esenvironmental.com

I am a research hydrologist with E&S Environmental Chemistry located in Corvallis, OR. We conduct research focused on effects of air pollution and climate change on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.


Research

I anticipate using NARCCAP data to evaluate impacts on watershed runoff from expected future changes in air temperature and precipitation. NARCCAP climate forecasts will be used to drive watershed scale runoff models for evaluating changes in runoff extremes. This work is currently in an exploratory phase.

 
 
 

Maurice McHugh

email: maurice.mchugh@noblis.org
website: http://www.noblis.org

Lead Scientist with a non-for-profit in the Washington DC suburbs.


Research

Interested in examining regional climate model output for changing climate conditions and climate extremes (heat waves and their duration, cold spells and their duration etc.) over the next 100 years.

Will examine differences between model runs with varying frequency of boundary condition updates (4xdaily, daily, weekly, monthly).

May use downscaled output as input boundary conditions for a regional climate model to produce even higher-resolution climate-change data.

 
 
 

David McInerney

email: dmcinern@uchicago.edu

Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago.


Research

I am interested in developing tools for emulating climate model output. We are currently building a library of CCSM3 runs with different future CO2 concentration trajectories and will test different statistical emulation techniques for reproducing output from a GCM. I would like to extend this analysis to emulation of regional climate models. The NARCCAP data will be valuable for preliminary testing of regional climate model emulation.

 
 
 

Gary McManus

email: gmcmanus@ou.edu
website: http://climate.mesonet.org

I am the Associate State Climatologist of Oklahoma and I work at the state climate office, the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. We are housed on the University of Oklahoma Campus in the National Weather Center. My interests include studying the climate variability of the Southern Plains, and the climate change aspects of that variability.


Research

I would like to use the NARCCAP simulations to better identify possible impacts for the state of Oklahoma, in accordance with our past work. That past work includes the formulation and production of an Oklahoma Climatological Survey statement on climate change.

The original plan in producing that document was to branch out and produce further documents concentrating on various facets of society and industry, such as water use, energy, agriculture and public health. Those documents would be produced in collaboration with state experts in those particular fields. The decision was made to wait until the science of regional climate projections matured and improved. NARCCAP certainly appears to be a step in that direction and would be a key part as the Oklahoma Climatological Survey moved ahead in legislatively-mandated efforts to provide the state's citizens and decision-makers with pertinent and timely information related to climate.

At the onset, and at the very least, the graphical presentations of the simulations could be used in the public speaking events we participate in on the subject of climate change. Following that, the output from NARCCAP would be used to produce Oklahoma scenarios for future impact studies.

 
 
 

Renee McPherson

email: renee@ou.edu
website: http://climate.ok.gov

State Climatologist, Oklahoma Climatological Survey, University of Oklahoma B.S. Mathematics & Meteorology, University of Wisconsin; M.S. Meteorology, University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., Meteorology, University of Oklahoma Dr. McPherson has experience in applied climatology, mesoscale meteorology, severe storms, applied meteorology, and surface observing systems. She also teaches Applied Meteorology and Climatology. Most recently, her work has focused on integrated surface observing systems, land-air-vegetation interactions, the climate and weather extremes of Oklahoma, and climate impacts on water, ecosystems, and society. Dr. McPherson is a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), American Association of State Climatologists, and other professional organizations. She serves on the AMS Commission on the Weather and Climate Enterprise and has led efforts to bring economic development to Oklahoma through technology transfer to the private sector and the international community.

Research
Data will be used in collaboration with other researchers and students to address climate change and impacts in the south-central U.S. Early work will compare model results with observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet.

 
 
 

David Mechem

email: dmechem@ku.edu

I'm an Assistant Professor in the Atmospheric Science program, part of the Department of Geography at the University of Kansas. I have a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington and a B.S. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.


Research

Together with my colleagues here at KU (Brunsell, Feddema), I am interested in the impact of different emission and land use scenarios on mid-latitude deep convection. Our focus will be on the large precipitation gradient across the central U.S., the role of land use and irrigation in the western regions of the Plains, and the seasonal timings of specific temperature and precipitation windows critical for crop success. We also plan to investigate the role of vegetation in regional water cycling. Employing the NARCCAP simulations will greatly aid in gauging baseline sensitivities as a springboard to additional, convection-permitting regional simulations.

 
 
 

Sanjay Mehta

email: sanjaymehta@narl.gov.in

Post Doctoral Fellow
National Atmospheric Research Laboratory

Research Interests: Tropopause, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, TTL, climate and modeling


Research

My main plan is to use NARCCAP data for understanding the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and their role in climate change. There are several activities going on to study the role of the Upper Troposphere / Lower Stratosphere region (tropical and exratropical tropopause layer, TTL and ExTTL) on the global circulation. The UTLS region has became an important issue for understanding chemistry and climate using model data. There are several factors, such as the role of zone and water vapor on production of OH radical and hence its effect on the radiation budget, and vice versa.

 
 
 

Rui Mei

email: rui.mei@uconn.edu

I am a Ph.D. student in Environmental Engineering Program at University of Connecticut working with Professor Wang Guiling. My research interest is focused on land-atmosphere interaction.


Research

Our main research goal here is to compare the soil moisture-precipitation feedback between observation and high-resolution regional climate modeling data from mutli-model simulations. The approach is mainly categorized lagged correlation analysis. The data we plan to use is the output of precipitation and soil moisture from RCMs driven by NCEP data.I believe this piece of work will be significant and helpful to understand the seeming contrast of land-atmosphere coupling strength between observation and model simulations, brought up by previous studies.

 
 
 

John Mejia

email: john.mejia@dri.edu

Dr. Mejia works as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, NV. Dr. Mejia received his B.S. in Civil Engineering in 1999 and his M.S. in 2002 in Water Resources Management from University of Colombia, Colombia, and his Ph.D. Meteorology in 2008 from University of Oklahoma. His main research areas are in fundamental understanding of climate system processes, and climate variability and change applications. Currently, He is focused on the development and implementation of statistically and dynamically based downscaling of Global Climate Modeling products into spatial-temporal scales relevant for regional and local impact studies. His current work also includes: creating a framework to explore future climate change signals in the intermountain West region; synthesizing climate modeling outputs into practical products for the users' community; and developing transportable methodologies to improve the applicability of such products. Both global and regional climate model results, products, predictions, and projections are made available to other project components (Ecology; Hydrology; Cyberinfrastructure). Continuous efforts are also made to provide relevant information to other key end-user groups.


Research

My research focuses on developing and implementing different approaches to downscale GCM output to resolutions appropriate (i.e., preferably ~10km) for hydrological, ecological, and economic impact modeling studies and predictions for impact assessment over the southwestern U.S. (with emphasis over the state of Nevada). The impacts of future climate change are likely to be more pronounced at scales not resolved accurately by GCMs. It is thus assumed that Regional Climate Models (RCMs) and statistical downscaling (SDS) can produce significant climate signals related to processes associated with orographic forcing upon prescribed large-scale forcing obtained from different climate change future scenarios.

We are evaluating the overall performance of different Regional Climate Model configurations using the WRF-V3.2 model for climate change projections and impact studies with respect to a varying horizontal resolution and sensitivity to a selection of physical parameterizations. We are testing 3 nested domains with 36, 12 and 4 km horizontal grid resolutions and 16 different physics configurations. Preliminary results show that the model moderately responds to the large-scale forcing conditions producing adequate diurnal cycle, seasonal evolution and moderately responding to interannual fluctuations from teleconnection patterns such as ENSO. Furthermore, different error metrics reveal that the model substantially improves when reducing the horizontal grid size from 36 to 12 km, but with smaller or even without any improvements for the 4 km horizontal grid size simulations. It appears that the error accumulation associated with model drifting in the inner domain (4 km) overcomes the benefits of the horizontal resolution improvements. The different physics configurations showed systematic biases (with relatively small spread) of surface temperature and precipitation parameters; however, we have found a set of best options for our regional climate downscaling applications.

We would like to have access to NARCCAP data to compare its 50 km resolution against our 36 and 12 km grid configurations. Further, it will allow as to produce a robust assessment of spread of the solutions for future climate projections.

 
 
 

Roy Mendelssohn

email: roy.mendelssohn@noaa.gov

I am a research scientist at Pacific Fisheries Environmental Laboratory, a lab that is part of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in NOAA/Fisheries. We have done research for many years on how climate variability affects marine resources.


Research

Generally we are looking at how to verify model output using Bayesian and non-Bayesian techniques, how to pull-out the dominant modes of behavior on different time scales, and how to develop indices from model output that can be used in ecosystem assessments.

 
 
 

Matias Mendez

email: matias.mendezp@gmail.com

PhD in Atmospheric Sciences at National Autonomous University of Mexico.

Research
Comparison of statistical downscaling climate change scenarios generated by our working group and dynamical downscaling available in NARCCAP. Analysis of future changes in daily precipitation and temperature (maximum and minimum) extreme indices according to dynamical models.

 
 
 

Brian Menounos

email: menounos@unbc.ca

Brian Menounos, associate professor of Earth Sciences Geography Program and Natural Resources and Environmental Studies Institute University of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way Prince George, BC, V2N 4Z9 tel: 250-960-6266 fax: 250-960-6533 email: menounos@unbc.ca web: http://web.unbc.ca/~menounos/

Research
I'm particularly interested in these data for dynamical downscaling work (WRF) \ and using these data as initial/lateral boundary condition for WRF.

 
 
 

Roberto Mera

email: rjmera@coas.oregonstate.edu
website: http://www.occri.net

PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from North Carolina State University. Currently a UCAR postdoc fellow working at the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI) and the Oregon Department for Land Conservation and Development.


Research

The goals with the NARCCAP data is to diagnose the model's ability to represent climate over the Pacific Northwest. The future scenario data will then be used for research involving land conservation and development over Oregon for the 21st century.

Acceptable representation of the climatological period will allow for comparison with coarse scale global models and with the recently-developed regional climateprediction.net experiment over the Northwest.

Future scenarios will be applied to GIS data to understand the climate-land use interface. Results from this interface as well as model analysis will be submitted for peer review.

 
 
 

Scott Merrill

email: scott.merrill@colostate.edu

Received my Ph.D. in Ecology from Colorado State University studying the overwintering success of an important pest of winter wheat. Currently, I am a research assistant professor at the University of Vermont looking at the effects of climate and climate change on agricultural pests.

Research
I intend to use NARCCAP data to examine the impacts of climate change on the phenology of the sunflower stem weevil and other important agroecological pests.

 
 
 

Ariane Middel

email: ariane.middel@asu.edu
website: http://dcdc.asu.edu

Ariane Middel received a Master in Geodetic Engineering and Geoinformation at the University of Bonn, Germany, in 2003, and earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, in 2008. She is currently Post-Doc at the Decision Center for a Desert City (DCDC) at Arizona State University (http://dcdc.asu.edu).


Research

Ariane is working with Anthony Brazel (ASU) and Pat Gober (ASU) on a NOAA grant entitled "Integrated Water and Land Planning as a Climate Adaptation Strategy: Comparisons of Portland, Oregon and Phoenix, Arizona". This research links weather and climate data to land-use and water consumption patterns in the two metro areas to develop regional strategies for adapting proactively to the uncertainties of climate change. Water and energy fluxes are modeled at the neighborhood level, using the Local Scale Urban Meteorological Parameterization Scheme (LUMPS) model, to investigate relationships among land cover, temperature change, and water consumption. NARCCAP data will be used to simulate the effects of long-term climate change on water demand.

 
 
 

Kevin Middel

email: kmiddel@gmail.com


Research

I am researching future impacts of climate change on polar bears of Hudson Bay. I will use sea ice data from a variety of models and scenarios to compare potential changes in ice break-up and freeze-up dates as well as regional patterns of break-up/freeze-up and how they may affect space use of bears through the winter. I will also use this data to link atmospheric variables to ice dynamics with the intent to spatially model ice breakup and freezeup at a more appropriate scale for polar bears. This work is being done as part of my M.Sc. research with Trent University.

 
 
 

Tom Miewald

email: thomas_miewald@fws.gov

Specialties Spatial conservation planning, remote sensing and vegetation mapping, project design and management, collaborative ecological assessments and mapping, ecological modeling, landscape scale ecological assessments, decision support tools.

Research
Vulnerability Assessment to Support Development of a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy - A Pilot Approach in the Lower Coquille Valley, Oregon

Phase 1 Summary: Coordinate with partners to identify conservation targets; provide information about future climate conditions from regional climate models; and develop a GIS framework for project outputs.

A key task will be to meet with all conservation stakeholders to identify the conservation and management priorities and measures that will be the basis for all future project work. Then a report will be generated on likely future climate conditions that will affect the resources of concern which form the foundation for the vulnerability assessment. This report will be based on regional, downscaled models of climate projections for the year 2050 (or the 2050s if model outputs are only available by decade). The project will contract climate science experts to compile and generate downscaled climate information for several climate parameters that affect estuaries, including rainfall, temperature, and sea level rise. The report will be based on a review of all relevant and available data and studies at appropriate scales. A GIS framework for storing and manipulating project data and outputs will also be created.

Final products will include:
* A synthesis of existing data on ecosystem resources and conditions in the Coquille Watershed
* Based on a series of partner meetings, a collaborative identification of priority habitats/species/ecological processes in the Coquille area, which will be the foundation for the vulnerability assessment
* A report on likely future climate conditions in the Coquille basin, to include changes in rainfall, temperature, storminess, and sea level
* An analysis of uncertainty associated with the climate model projections used for this project
* A populated GIS framework for storing, manipulating, and visualizing project data and outputs
* A report on activities and lessons learned from Phase 1
* Detailed plan and budget for completing Phase 2

Geographic and Temporal Focus: The focus area includes tidally influenced portions of the Coquille watershed, including the estuary itself, the ocean shoreline, wetlands, and hydrologically or ecologically associated upland areas. Models will project climate changes up to the 2050s. When feasible, relevant upstream and oceanic process that could affect the focus area will be considered.

 
 
 

Luke Miller

email: l.miller@neu.edu

Postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University's Marine Science Center


Research

Our research program at Northeastern University's Marine Science Center involves exploring the effects of the changing climate on rocky intertidal marine organisms that are alternately submerged at high tide and exposed to the air at low tide. The organisms living in this environment experience broad swings in temperature as a result of the tide cycling, and are frequently exposed to extreme cold or hot temperatures during aerial exposure. We seek to integrate predictions from climate models of future environmental conditions (primarily temperatures) with existing models of organismal temperature and physiological tolerance data to drive experiments on species interactions under shifting climate regimes.

 
 
 

Rawlings Miller

email: rmiller@icfi.com

Research interests include climate impact assessments studies, defining optimum selection criteria to inform careful consideration of optimum data to drive each assessment, and aerosol effects.

Research
I would like to use NARCCAP data for an independent study investigating how the choice of pavement binders used in the transportation sector may vary with climate change. I am particularly interested in using the Tasmax & Tasmin variables for a few select locations in the U.S. My study compares how adaptation options may vary depending on the choice of various available climate datasets. I will be comparing the results using the NARCCAP data with those driven by available statistical data.

 
 
 

Thomas Miller

email: tmiller@eorinc.com
website: http://www.eorinc.com

We are water resources engineers researching the impact of climate change on water resources. We are particularly interested in using existing hydrologic, hydraulic, water quality, and ecological models to predict impacts of changing hydrologic regimes on aquatic and riparian vegetation.


Research

This project will incorporate predicted climate change scenarios into a calibrated watershed hydrological model (XPSWMM) which will provide predicted water inflow and nutrient loading for the Brown's Creek and Minnehaha Creek watersheds. The information from the Minnehaha Creek watershed model along with the predicted climate change data will be used as an input into a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic and ecological lake models (ELCOM-CAEDYM). The integrated watershed and lake water quality models will enable computational tools that can be used to evaluate the effects of expected water level variability on the littoral vegetated habitats. Fluctuating water level impacts will be investigated at the U of MN's new Outdoor Stream Laboratory (OSL) facility at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL). Multiple plots will be established at OSL to study sediment nutrient release under different flooding conditions (inundations periods). Additionally, aquatic plants along the OSL as well as those in its flood plain will be monitored throughout the season for their performance and survivability. Finally, a series of recommendations will be developed for future shoreline vegetation management.

 
 
 

Dev Millstein

email: dmillstein@lbl.gov

Hello NARCCAP research community, I research potential climate change impacts to energy and water systems. I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Prior to LBNL I studied air quality and diesel pollution at UC Berkeley and received my PhD in 2009 (Civil and Environmental Engineering). I studied economics at Vassar College as an undergraduate.

Research
We are studying uncertainty in future climate predictions through the lens of water and energy systems. The main goal is to link regional climate output of various models to physical/economic models of specific infrastructure systems. We hope the significance of the work will be to help infrastructure planners understand how to interpret the uncertainty in climate model forecasts and use this information for improved long-term planning.

 
 
 

Seung-Ki Min

email: seung-ki.min@ec.gc.ca

Research Scientist
Climate Research Division
Environment Canada
4905 Dufferin St., Toronto ON M3H 5T4 Canada
Phone 416-739-5788, Fax 416-739-5700


Research

I'm interested in evaluating and combining multi-RCM simulations for the past and future climate changes. Probabilistic approach will be employed to address large uncertainties arising from finer local scales, and relative contributions of inter-model difference and internal climate variability will be explored in terms of changes in both climatology and variability of various climate variables including temperature and precipitation.

 
 
 

Hiroaki Minoura

email: hiroaki.minoura@tema.toyota.com

I'm majoring in atmospheric science Ph.D. in Japan. I studying the air quality impact of vehicle emission in Toyota Technical Center of North America.

Research
I evaluate the impact on air quality from vehicle emissions using the atmospheric simulation model CMAQ of EPA, and do actual situation understanding of the atmospheric environment using air quality monitoring data and satellite data.The NCARCAP data is used as information related to the weather in these analyses.

 
 
 

Golbahar Mirhosseini

email: gzm0004@tigermail.auburn.edu

I am a Ph.D. student of at Auburn University. I have a B.Sc. degree in Civil Eng. and a M.Sc. degree in Environmental Eng.


Research

One of the critical concerns about the water quality is created by nonpoint source pollution. Although there are many potential contributors of non-point source pollution, agriculture is the most important one in the U.S. Since continuous water quality monitoring is expensive and impractical in mixed land use watersheds, mathematical watershed-scale models are the best available tools for analyzing water resources issues. One of these models which has been widely used, is a physically-based model called "Soil and Water Assessment Tool" (SWAT). This model was applied to the watershed in southwest Alabama. The model parameters related to hydrology and water quality (nitrogen and phosphorus) were calibrated and validated by comparing model predictions with the observed data collected. In order to evaluate the quality of water due to irrigation, this application was applied in croplands of the watershed. The result shows that the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus will be increasing when irrigation is applied.

Following the research that I've done so far, I want to use future precipitation data in my SWAT model ( so far I've had the data from 1950-2010) and do the analysis again to see how the quality of water will change in future.

 
 
 

Ashok Mishra

email: akm.pce@gmail.com

Postdoctoral Research Associate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Research
I want to investigate RCM data for drought analysis, hydrologic modeling and evaluating extreme events.

 
 
 

Nischal Mishra

email: nzm0022@auburn.edu

Graduate Research Assistant at Auburn University
Undergraduate Major: Civil Engineering


Research

The primary objective of my research is the analysis of droughts in the South-Eastern United States by the use of various hydrological data. I want to use currently available data to spatially and temporally predict future droughts.

 
 
 

Sudipta Mishra

email: sudiptakumar-mishra@uiowa.edu

I am a grad student at University of Iowa

Research
Will run hydrologic model under different RCMs.

 
 
 

Vimal Mishra

email: vmishra@hydro.washington.edu
website: http://www.hydro.washington.edu

Perdue University Dissertation: Understanding impacts of historic climate variability and climate change on lakes in the Great Lakes Region
Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Agricultural and Food Engineering Department KHARAGPUR, INDIA Thesis: Hydrologic studies of an East German mountainous catchment
Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture and Technology Agricultural Engineering Thesis: Design and economical analysis of different water conveyance systems

Research
Hydrologic Extremes in a changing climate: how much information can regional climate models provide? Science Questions:
1. To what extent do RCM internal dynamics, relative to boundary forcing, influence the RCM?s ability to reproduce observed probability distributions of precipitation extremes (e.g., as estimated from the annual maximum series), and how does that ability vary over the western U.S.? 2. What spatial resolution is necessary to reproduce the observed probability distribution of precipitation? Are very high-resolution simulations on the 1-2 km scale necessary, or can we accurately represent extremes with coarser resolutions (10s of km)? 3. How will future hydrologic extremes change under a warmer climate, and what information can we provide for the adaptation of urban hydraulic structures?
Tasks and methods:
We intend to identify a set of about 10 urban areas across the western U.S., and hourly precipitation data within each of these areas, which will be extracted from the NCDC TD 3240 data set as discussed in Section 4.2. We will analyze the annual maximum series of precipitation extremes simulated for NARCCAP (using Reanalysis boundary forcing) for the grid cells close to station data, and will compare the distributions of annual maximum precipitation for accumulation intervals ranging from one to 28 hours. Recognizing that there will inevitably be differences between the station data and RCM grid cell values, we will examine the scale dependence in the distributions of extremes. Where multiple stations are available over the selected urban domains, we will evaluate statistics describing the spatial coherence of storms in the annual maximum series of station data and RCM output. Our intent will be to examine whether the spatial coherence of the storms that are associated with annual maxima is consistent between station observations and RCM output.

 
 
 

Arthur Mizzi

email: amizzi@walshenv.com


Research

Main research goals: NARCCAP data, especially that data pertaining to wind and planetary boundary layer forecasts and climatologies, will be compared with the output of RCM solutions driven by IPCC scenario GCM results.

Research methods and plan: Forced by IPCC GCM results, RCM experiments will be conducted, the output of which will be compared to NARCCAP datasets. Particular attention will be paid to boundary layer and wind variables.

What data are needed: We are especially interested in boundary layer and wind data.

Anticipated findings or significance of work: We anticipate this cross comparison will facilitate assessment of our simulations, and so our assessment of forecasts and climatologies of boundary layer features and wind into this century.

 
 
 

Naga Raghuveer Modala

email: naga.modala@ag.tamu.edu

I earned my Bachelors in Biotechnology from India and completed my Masters from Kansas State University with main emphasis on watershed modeling and GIS. Currently, I am pursuing my Ph.D. at Texas A&M University with emphasis on Crop growth Modeling and Climate Change. My research involves assessing the impact of historic and future climate variability and change on crop production, water use and soil carbon sequestration using DSSAT Crop Modeling.

Research
The overall goal of this research is to develop and evaluate efficient irrigation strategies for major crops in the Texas High Plains (THP) ( for cotton, corn, and grain sorghum) and the Texas Rolling Plains(TRP) (for cotton and winter wheat) regions. The outcomes of this research will not only offer improved decision support tools to benefit the producers in the THP and TRP regions, but also provide a regional assessment of the sustainability of various cropping systems in response to the existing and future climate conditions. Specific objectives of this study are: 1.Evaluate the DSSAT Crop simulation models to simulate crop growth and yield of major crops in the THP and TRP and to develop farm-scale crop and irrigation decision support tools. 2.Assess the impacts of historic and future climate variability and change on crop production and water use in these regions and suggest strategies for adaptation to climate change.

The data used to fulfill objective 1 is obtained from various experimental studies conducted across the THP and TRP. The Texas Alliance for Water Conservation has been monitoring water use in major cropping systems in 26 producers? fields in the THP region since 2005 to develop economically viable water conservative irrigation strategies (TAWC, 2008, 2009). In the TRP, several irrigation scheduling experiments involving cotton, winter wheat, and sorghum have been conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Experimental station at Chillicothe. Some of the experiments at Chillicothe include application of irrigation amounts to crops based on canopy temperature, crop evapotranspiration, soil moisture content and soil water tension. Most of the model inputs for this study will be based on the above mentioned demonstration and experimental studies.

For Objective 2: I want to download future climate data from NARCCAP website. I want to download daily maximum temperature, minimum temperature, wind speed, solar radiation, precipitation for different GCM's.

 
 
 

Ibrahim Mohammed

email: ibrahim.mohammed@aggiemail.usu.edu
website: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/ibrahim-n-mohammed/25/152/635

Utah Water Research Laboratory
8200 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-8200

I am interested in studying human and natural systems interactions with their associated impacts on water production and the biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems.


Research

The overarching goal of my work with NARCCAP data is to be able to quantify the sensitivity of hydrology to land cover, land use and climate change. Specifically, I am interested in estimating the runoff from a watershed as driven by precipitation and snowmelt and how this runoff might change as land use, land cover or climate changes. Since runoff is a major water balance input for the Great Salt Lake (GSL), I am also interested in predicting the level of the GSL when runoff from the surrounding GSL watersheds is impacted by climate and land use changes.

With the use of the NARCCAP data I will be able to forecast the fluctuations in the GSL level as they are related to the forcings such as precipitation and air temperature, land use and cover changes that act on the lake-basin system as well as to the impact of salinity on the GSL evaporation will be developed. The forecast times intended for the model are 1, 5, 10, and 20 years ahead.

The results of this study will provide important needed information for natural presources and land management planners, and the hydrologic science community who have to anticipate: (a) how runoff will likely change in response to human induced activities and climate change, and (b) how sensitive runoff is to changes in climate and land cover. The principal benefit of this proposed work to the hydrologic community will be an improved understanding of the linkage between land cover change with emphasis on vegetation and runoff generation in watersheds under climate change conditions. The output results of my work are intended to quantify the general sensitivity of water availability at the scale of regional subbasins to changes in land use, climate, and watershed management.

 
 
 

Rhett Mohler

email: rlmohler@hotmail.com

Research Associate at Kansas State University Interested in the effects of climate change on agriculture.

Research
I have been part of a team looking into the effect of extreme heat events on livestock in the Midwest. Specifically, I have been looking at the spatial distribution of temperature humidity index (THI) values in relation to locations with high livestock mortality. The hot summer of 2011 is a good example of high THI values coinciding with high livestock mortality. Now, my main research goal has shifted to extending this analysis into the future, in order to see how THI values might affect livestock mortality across the Midwest in the years to come. Consequently, I plan to calculate future THI values from modeled humidity and temperature data. This will allow me to map regions of the Midwest that might be most susceptible to livestock mortality as a result of future climate events. These regions can then be targeted for mitigation efforts.

 
 
 

Edmundo Molina-Perez

email: emolina@rand.org
website: http://www.rand.org/about/people/m/molina-perez_edmundo.html

Edmundo Molina-Perez is a policy analyst at RAND. He has a PhD in Policy Analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School,a M.S. in engineering and policy analysis from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and a B.S. in civil engineering from Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Molina-Perez worked for the Central Bank of Mexico as a planning analyst, for Deloitte Consulting as a technology analyst, and for UNAM's Engineering Institute as a junior researcher. His research has focused on renewable energy technologies and technology policy analysis. His interests include climate change, sustainability, technological transitions, modeling methods, and exploratory analysis.


Research

Project title: "Informing Climate-Related Decisions with Earth Systems Models"

The project examines value of alternative types of climate information for decision support. Activities are organized around two research questions:

  1. What is the value of climate information with increased spatial resolution?
  2. What is the value of imprecise/deeply uncertain information about potentially extreme behaviors of the climate system?

This project’s research questions relevant to important issues in the design of decision support applications, including: 1) Allocation of computational resources and 2)Presentation of uncertainty

The project uses Robust Decision Making (RDM) to compare alternative strategies to manage water resources in California's Central Valley. RDM is an iterative analytic approach for supporting decisions under conditions of deep uncertainty. RDM Conducts analysis “backwards,” by organizing uncertainty characterization around comparison of proposed strategies.

The specific NARCCAP projections we will be using aqre those associated with the state of California, for the period 2006-2050.

 
 
 

Arpita Mondal

email: arpita567@gmail.com

PhD Student
Department of Civil Engineering
Indian Institute of Science
Bangalore 560012, India


Research

For my doctoral research, I am currently trying to study the impacts of climate change in hydrology. I want NARCCAP data for a comparison with the statistical downscaling model that I have developed.

 
 
 

Andre Monette

email: monette@sca.uqam.ca

UQAM master student

Research

I'm a student at UQAM in atmospheric sciences program. I'm presently doing my thesis on the analysis of extreme precipitation over the Province of Quebec using the regional frequency analysis based on L-Moments. I'll like to use the daily precipitation data over the AMNO domain.

 
 
 

Alvaro Montenegro

email: alvaro@uvic.ca
website: http://climate.uvic.ca/people/alvaro/

I'm a postdoc fellow working at the University of Victoria Climate Modelling group in BC, Canada. Most of my work so far has been based on the UVic ESCM EMIC but I have also done some data based climate change impact analysis for the BC forestry sector.


Research

I plan to use the NARCCAP data on climate impact analysis for BC's Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure. The Ministry is interested in understanding the impact of future climate change on their building and maintenance protocols.

This project is at its incipient stages and much is yet to be defined. At this time the list of pertinent parameters include mid and end of 21st century projections of parameters like rainfall intensity/duration, freeze/thaw cycles, temperature ranges, wind speeds and total snow precipitation. The spatial scale of interest is ~50km but the particular areas of interest are still to be decided.

 
 
 

Martin Jose Montero-Martinez

email: mmontero@tlaloc.imta.mx

Profession: Atmospheric Physicist
Date and Place of Birth: January 30, 1968. Mexico City.
Working at IMTA since: February 2000
Education: BS in Physics (1989), Autonomous University of Puebla (Mexico)
MS in Geophysics (1993), National Autonomous University of Mexico
PhD in Atmospheric Sciences (1999), University of Arizona (USA)
Postdoc (1999-2000, 1 Yr) at University of Dalhousie (Canada)

Detailed Tasks Assigned:

To perform research in the fields of aerosols (biomass burning), global climate change, atmospheric numerical modeling, and adaptation measurements to climate change.

Relevant projects:

  • 2007 Climate impact effects and potential impacts on water resources in Mexico.
    Funded by IMTA 2007. Responsible of providing IPCC (GCMs) analyzed data.
  • 2007 Climate trends of extreme hydrometeorological phenomena in Mexico during the last 40 years.
    Funded by CONACYT-CONAGUA 2007-2010. Principal Investigator.
  • 2006 Implementation of the atmospheric model CAM3 in the USMN cluster.
    Funded by CONAGUA 2005-06. Principal investigator.
  • 2005 Climate change studies in the precipitation features due to land cover and use change in northwestern Mexico.
    Funded by IMTA 2005. Principal investigator.
  • 2004 PNUD/INE/CCA/IMTA: Promotion of capacities for stage 2 of climate change adaptation in Central America, Mexico and Cuba
    Funded by GEF 2004-2006. Responsible for the water sector in the Mexican part.
  • 2002 CONACYT/IMTA J38238-T: Monitoring biomass burning aerosols in Southeast Mexico to characterize their optical and radiative properties and determine their regional climate impacts
    Funded by CONACYT 2002-2004. Principal Investigator (3 colaborators + 5 students)
  • 2001 CONACYT/IMTA I35630-T: Estimate of the climate impact in Mexico due to the global biomass burning aerosols by using the model NCAR-CCM3
    Funded by CONACYT 2001. Principal Investigator (individual).


Research

Jose Luis Perez and myself currently are working in a project for the Mexican Meteorological Service in which we will need to use dynamical downscaling to regionalize scenarios data from the NCAR-CCSM model for all of Mexico. Thus, our interest in your data is based in which you cover some part of Mexico using different coupled GCMs regionalized with different regional models. Thus, one of our key questions is to know what kind of possibility would be that you could cover all of Mexico in NARCCAP future work. Other question is to know more about the downscaling process that you use, and based on that, to know once and for all if we are working in the right direction.

 
 
 

Edward Moran

email: emoran@usgs.gov
website: http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/

Expertise: Surface- and Ground-Water Flow, Quantity, and Quality; Physical/Environmental Systems and Processes Computer Modeling; Advanced-Technology Data Collection and Analysis. Education: M.S. ? Environmental Science, Alaska Pacific University (APU); B.S. ? Environmental Science, Alaska Pacific University (APU). Experience: USGS, Columbia Environmental Research Center; USGS, Alaska Science Center; APU, Associate Professor; Bethel Services Environmental Consulting: Alaska. Additional Training and Experience: USGS MODFLOW (Ground-Water Transport, Stream-Routing, Lake, MODPATH, and SEAWAT), GSFLOW, PRMS, MMS, SNTemp and OTIS; ESRI ArcGIS, ArcInfo, and ArcView and all extensions; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS and HEC-HMS; Global Positioning System and Conventional Land Surveying; USGS Surface and Ground Water Data Collection, USGS Water-Quality Data Collection and Analysis; USGS Research Drilling; Satellite and Geophysical Data Processing and Interpretation.

Research
Critical to any attempts at recovery of the Missouri River ecosystem, managers need to understand the potential impacts that management actions and environmental change might have on sustainable fish populations as river dynamics change. Downscaling regional climate models to river systems requires translating changing climate variables, such as air temperature and precipitation, to changing water temperature and river discharge. Identifying such changes to the hydrologic system commonly are performed through the use of hydrologic models. Two physical models, the Corp of Engineers' HEC-HMS 3.5 model used to generate continuous stream flow and the USGS Stream Network Temperature model SNTemp used to simulate stream water temperatures were effectively developed and reasonably simulate 1950 to 2009 observed discharge and temperature for the Missouri River and 23 major feeding tributaries. Both models are being used to generate data for further studies using various climate data available for several regional climate scenario data sets.

 
 
 

Philip Morefield

email: morefield.philip@epa.gov

EPA - Global Change Research Program


Research

Working with Chris Weaver to use NARCCAP data for water quality impacts work.

 
 
 

Ralph Morris

email: rmorris@environcorp.com
website: http://www.environcorp.com

I am a Principal at ENVIRON International Corporation where I direct regional meteorological, emissions and air quality modeling studies. I develop control strategies to demonstrate compliance with air qualoty standards.

Research
I am interested in using the NARCCAP data to determine how climate change will affect meteorology, land cover, emisisons and air quality. Would like to start accounting for climate change when making future year air quality projections that demonsrtrate compliance with air qualoty standards.

 
 
 

Linda Mortsch

email: ldmortsc@fesmail.uwaterloo.ca

Senior Impacts and Adaptation Researcher
Adaptation and Impacts Research Division
Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate,
Environment Canada
c/o Faculty of Environmental Studies,
University of Waterloo
200 University Ave W.,
Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1
Phone: 519-888-4567 ext 35495
Fax: 519-746-2031
linda.mortsch@ec.gc.ca

AFFILIATIONS:

Adjunct, Geography Department, Faculty of Environmental Studies, University of Waterloo


Research

  1. Climate change vulnerability, impacts and adaptation assessment in water resources (quantity and quality), and inland coastal wetland ecosystems
    • development of climate change scenarios for water resources planning and management
      • working with water resource practitioners in developing climate change scenarios for incorporation into strategic watershed planning (e.g., source water protection) and flood plain management and emergency preparedness
      • climate change scenarios applied in impact assessments for the Great Lakes basin have used GCM output; how can dynamical downscaling (regional climate model) results be applied in this context; how can we use multi-ensemble runs; how do the RCMs "behave" over the Great Lakes Basin
    • development of daily extreme precipitation scenarios for erosion, water quality and flooding impact and risk assessments
  2. Climate change adaptation in community design and urban planning
    • adaptation to climate change would require significant changes to design standards for streets, buildings, open spaces, and infrastructure systems. Changes would likely be required at the scale of the region, the city, the district, and the site.
      • how can climate change scenarios be developed to understand impacts of a changing climate and to deveop

APPLICATIONS OF NARCCAP DATA:

  1. Development of multiple, high resolution climate change scenarios for water resources and ecosystem modelling studies in selected regions in Canada
  2. Development of daily precipitation time series for applications in water quality modelling (e.g., erosion), hydrologic modelling for flooding impact assessment and assessment of adaptation strategies (e.g., design floods, detention ponds)

 
 
 

Steven Mosher

email: moshersteven@gmail.com

Scientist, BerkeleyEarth.org


Research

I am working on developing a high-resolution temperature record for North American. Currently, we have a achieved 1/4 degree resolution for North America dating back to the 1800's. As a part of our testing we are comparing our fields to UAH records, RSS records, NARR, MERRA and PRISM. We have also worked with NARCCAP data in the past to estimate future extreme events such as heat waves. I intend to compare our fields to the simulated historical data so that we can select the best of breed models for our future work in extreme events.

 
 
 

Matthew Moskwik

email: mpmoskwik@mail.utexas.edu


Research
Threatened and endangered species face a variety of threats, and future climate change could stall recovery efforts or exacerbate losses. Additionally, when preparing management and recovery plans conservation biologists and land managers must prioritize known threats. It is currently unknown the threat that climate change poses to many threatened or endangered species, let alone how it should be prioritized. This is primarily due to the uncertainty associated with climate change projections. Thus, there exists a critical need to quantify the responses of threatened and endangered species to future climate change by accounting for the inherent uncertainty in the climate and species' distribution models. To meet this need, a team at the University of Texas will work on a large, multidisciplinary project with the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) and the Rand Corporation. The final product will consist of a robust decision-making analysis, detailing management decisions and probabilistic outcomes for each under various climate change projections. This product will allow conservation planners and land managers with the tools to make informed and robust management decisions for threatened and endangered species.

 
 
 

Georgy Mostovoy

email: gvmostovoy@gmail.com

Education: Ph.D. in Geography (Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology) from Moscow State University, Russia. Most recent job (2001-2011): Mississippi State University. Experience: sensitivity/case studies and validation of atmospheric mesoscale models(COAMPS, RAMS, and WRF) and land surface models. Interest: atmospheric and land surface numerical modeling for improved understanding of regional/local land-vegetation-atmosphere interaction and variability at different temporal scales (from seasonal to decadal).

Research
I would like to validate some of NARCCAP NCEP-driven simulations (surface fields mainly, e.g. soil moisture and skin temperature) against available observations over the SE states. SCAN soil moisture data will be used. Mean seasonal and intaseasonal trends of soil water storage will be compared with mean observed trends. Relationship of these trends to variability of precipitation frequency and ammount will be assessed. It would help to understand better relative importance of various precipitation statistics (event frequency versus mean ammount of rain and relevant uncertainty, as well) in maintaining observed/simulated soil water storage trends in different geographical regions.

 
 
 

Thomas Mote

email: tmote@uga.edu


Research
We anticipate using NARCCAP for analysis for climate change and its influence on fuel loads and fire vulnerability in the Southeastern United States. See Willis Shem's entry for more details.

 
 
 

Deep Mukherjee

email: deep.mukherjee@uconn.edu

I work with Prof. Richard Anya at the University of Connecticut.

Research
I am a PhD student, studying future climate change impacts on agricultural production. I need to know future projections about temperature and humidity for couple of counties in the US. That will enhance the quality of the paper.

 
 
 

David Mulla

email: mulla003@umn.edu

Dr. Mulla received a Ph.D. degree in Agronomy from Purdue University with emphasis in soil physics (1983). From 1983 to 1995 he was Assistant to Full Professor in the Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences at Washington State Univ. Since 1995 he has been Professor and Larson Chair for Soil & Water Resources in the Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate at the Univ. of Minnesota. Since January, 2004 he has been the Director of the Precision Agriculture Center at the Univ. of Minnesota and organized the 7th and 8th International Conferences on Precision Agriculture. In 2007 he was appointed a Founding Fellow in the Univ. of Minnesota?s Institute on Environment. In 2011 he was appointed to a National Academy of Sciences committee on water quality standards.

Research
The main research goal is to investigate how changes in climate will affect production of irrigated potatoes in Minnesota, and associated leaching losses of nitrate to groundwater. Research methods will involve use of the DSSAT model, which has been calibrated and validated for potato production and nitrate leaching with several years of experimental data from Becker, MN. The calibrated model will be re-run using future climate data scenarios based on NARCCAP data. NARCCAP data from several regional climate model - driving model combinations will be used for future climate scenarios. DSSAT model outputs will be compared with baseline (current) results for three selected decades spanning the period from 2020 to 2100. Anticipated findings can be used to predict economic impacts of future climate change on the potato production industry as well as environmental impacts on water use and groundwater pollution.

 
 
 

Gretchen Mullendore

email: gretchen@atmos.und.edu

Gretchen Mullendore is an assistant professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at University of North Dakota. Her research interests include: Mass transport in convection; Regional climatology; Cloud-scale dynamics. She received her Ph.D. from University of Washington in 2003, and B.S. in Geophysics from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1998.


Research

We plan to use the NARCCAP data to examine climate impacts on in the Northern Great Plains region with specific interest in changes in the synoptic regimes and hydrological cycle. We also want to use NARCCAP output to initialize higher resolution WRF runs, focusing on the North Dakota region, to investigate variability across different zones of land-use and terrain.

 
 
 

Evan Murdock

email: eamurdock@wisc.edu

Evan is a PhD student at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison.


Research

Research goals: I want to determine the possible impacts of climate change on the ability of the Mississippi river to provide cooling water for thermoelectric power generation.

Methods: I will be using NARCCAP data to populate a 1-D water temperature model of the Mississippi river. The output temperature time series will then drive a compliance tool to determine the number of hours an energy producer might have to scale back their production.

The model requires streamflow, temperature, dew point, cloud cover, and windspeed data, all of which we hope to be able to use directly or derive based on NARCCAP data.

Ultimately we hope to be able to assess the impacts of climate change on thermoelectric power generation in the Upper Mississippi River Basin.

 
 
 

Trevor Murdock

email: tmurdock@uvic.ca

Trevor Murdock is Associate Director of the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium in Victoria, BC. For the past 12 years, he has worked on applications of climate research to assist decision-making and planning. Trevor's work has focused on climate scenarios and online mapping tools, downscaling to high resolution, analysis of historical climate data and improvement of seasonal climate predictions.


Research

 
 
 

Ranjan Muttiah

email: muttiah2@swbell.net
website: http://www.gis-hydrology.com

I am a water resources professional with nearly 2 decades worth of experience in private industry and academia. My areas are watersheds, water conservation, water reuse, hydrology/hydraulics, lake and river water quality.


Research

Main interest lies in water availability in Texas, with my main collaborator being Dr. Ralph Wurbs, the developer of the Water Rights Analysis Package. We have analyzed the Brazos and San Jacinto River basins for CCCMA realizations of the future climate. The NARCCAP data will provide more refined downscales.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Christopher Nadeau

email: cpn28@cornell.edu

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.

Research
We will use NARCCAP data to : (1) quantify uncertainty in regional climate change, (2) develop a climate change hotspot map to be used in evaluating the effects of climate change on rare and threatened wildlife species, and (3) evaluate the assumptions inherent in many models evaluating the effects of climate change on wildlife. The results of our study will be relevant to future impact assessments conducted in the northeastern United States.

 
 
 

Naomi Naik

email: naominaik@gmail.com

Research Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. naomi@ldeo.columbia.edu

Research
We wish to access precipitation, evaporation and runoff data from the regional models in order to compare them with the same from global climate models and offline land hydrology models. We are particularly interested in the precipitation to runoff fraction in California, Colorado river head waters and Texas. To do this we will compute climatological seasonal cycles of these quantities. The significance of the work is to access if the regional models represent a significant improvement in realism of simulation relative to the global models. This will guide our work on assessing global climate model predictions of hydrological change in these regions in coming decades.

 
 
 

Mohammad Reza Najafi

email: najafim@cecs.pdx.edu

I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Portland State University. My special interests are in the field of hydrologic climate change impact studies, application of remotely sensed data in environmental prediction, with the main goal of quantifying and reducing the associated uncertainties, and physical/numerical modeling of flow in rivers and through hydraulic structures.

I am part of the Remote Sensing and Water Resources Laboratory at Portland State University, under the supervision of Dr. Moradkhani. Starting the PhD program in April 2009, I performed researches on the downscaling of large scale General Circulation Models (GCMs), and the uncertainties in hydrologic impact studies due to the climate change. We presented our studies in the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) annual meetings along with two peer-reviewed journal publications. Currently I am focused on my dissertation and perform analyses on Ensemble Streamflow Prediction along with accounting for the uncertainties in hydrologic modeling and by means of remotely sensed information.


Research

We are focused on the analysis of climate change impact on hydrologic variables such as the streamflow indifferent areas. The quantification of uncertainty is one of our main research areas.

Our goals using the RCM data is to: 1.use as inputs to hydrologic models for impact studies 2. quantify the uncertainties 3. compare with statistical downscaling methods and bias correction methods 4. risk analysis and adaptation strategies

We mainly combine these data with various hydrologic models for impact studies, bayesian approach is used for uncertainty quantifications and statistical methods like quantile mapping or regression based methods and others which we used in our previous papers will be compared with these datasets

In fact we try to use all the data from all models available and consider various scenarios to be able to perform a thorough analysis of the hydrologic impacts for better decision making and adaptation strategies. The results of the studies will be very helpful for water managers and decision makers in USA to take proper strategies considering the climate change. Other important benefits of these studies are mentioned in our previous papers. Also other publications of our group are mentioned in the following webpage: http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~hamidm/publications.php

 
 
 

Siddhartha Nandy

email: nandysid@stt.msu.edu
website: http://www.stt.msu.edu/People/people.aspx?member=nandysid

Graduate Student (PhD)
Dept. of Statistics & Probability
Michigan State University

I received my Bachelor's degree and Master's degree in Statistics from University of Calcutta, India in 2008 and 2010 respectively. I graduated from University of Calcutta with a Master's degree in Statistics with a specialization in Biostatistics. Then I worked as a tutor and research associate in Biostatistics in Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) and as a Consultant in ACCESS Health International.

In fall 2011 I joined the PhD program in Statistics in Michigan State University in the Dept. of Statistics and Probability. I am working under guidance of Prof. Chae-Young Lim and Prof. Tapabrata Maiti for my research.

I am currently interested in exploring the theoretical challenges of High dimensional variable selection, variable selection under spatial regression, nonparametric mean models etc. I am mostly using penalized regression. I am also interested in applying the developed and developing theories in various environmental setup such and climate change attribution, disease progression.


Research

It has been found that identifying important attributes responsible in predicting climate parameters, economic parameters and ecological parameters are fairly challenging. A common feature noticed in the above scenarios is a spatial relation among the sampling sites and so, it is quite reasonable to assume dependent error model under above scenarios. Hence, dependent error models are getting increasingly popular in modeling climate data, growth modeling of living objects over time, analyzing data from Geographic Information Systems, image processing and ecological studies etc.

The problem of selecting these attribution parameters can be looked into from a statistical view point, which reduces to capturing the mean effect of the underlying spatial process {Y (s); s in S}, the response variable. But modeling this underlying process {Y (s); s in S} using linear model has been proved quite ineffective [Huang, Y., et al. (2010)] due to the fact that these parameters are not linearly related to their respective predicting variable. So, instead we consider a semi-parametric additive model with spatial index.

The main objective of the proposed research will be to develop theoretically sound and computationally feasible statistical tools suitable for variable selection in a spatial additive model.

 
 
 

Shannon Neeley

email: sneeley@stat.byu.edu

I am an assistant professor at Brigham Young University.

Research
I work methods of combining multiple climate ensembles using Bayesian Factor analysis. While climate models are important tools for studying various processes that impact climate, there are many sources of variation that influence model output (such as, natural variability, assumptions for future conditions, spatial scales, etc.). Climate model ensembles are collections of models that are used to help account for uncertainties.

We work on ways to combine model output. Specifically, there are two approaches to combining model output. One way uses a mean or weighted mean approach. Another method is to use a factor analytic approach. We use the second method because factor analysis is more efficient at extracting common climate components and down-weighting anomalies. Recently, we have been developing a model that uses a Bayesian spatial factor analysis to combine multiple climate model output.

The purpose of this research is to help scientists understand the strengths and weaknesses of various climate models as well as summarize the overall climate factor that drives all model output.

 
 
 

Jason Neff

email: neffjc@colorado.edu
website: http://moab.colorado.edu

CV: http://moab.colorado.edu/NeffCV.html


Research

We are working with the BLM/Department of Interior in SW Colorado on a climate impacts project - the focus is beginning work on the potential impacts of climate change on public lands. Our focus will likely include forest health and wildfire but we will begin work by evaluating NARCCAP runs for the SW Colorado four corners region. We are also working closely with the NOAA - Western Water Assessment project for this work. Our BLM partners are part of the San Juan Public Lands Center.

 
 
 

Nathaniel Newlands

email: nathaniel.newlands@agr.gc.ca
website: http://www4.agr.gc.ca/AAFC-AAC/display-afficher.do?id=1181852804648

Research Scientist
Environmental Health
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Lethbridge Research Centre
5403 1st Ave. S., P.O. Box 3000,
Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, T1J 4B1
CANADA

Adjunct Professor in Statistics, University of British Columbia
Ph.D Environmental Modeling (Univ. British Columbia, Canada)
M.Sc. Astrophysics (Univ. Calgary, Alberta, Canada
B.Sc. Physics and Mathematics (Univ. Guelph, Ontario, Canada)

Research Interests: climate interpolation, teleconnections, statistical downscaling, agricultural impact risk assessment (e.g., crop yield, soil moisture)


Research

I would like to have access to NARCCAP scenario data for conducting a statistical downscaling model inter-comparison study (that includes a new semi-parametric method, CLIGEN and some other methods). We are hoping to compare a stochastic and deterministic modeling method to better understand variability expected in different regions, and in relation to historical station-based data. I am anticipating to use CRCM+CGCM3, HRM3+HadCM3,RCM3+CGCM3, RCM3+GFDL scenario data.

I am exploring alternative statistical downscaling approaches for predicting temperature and precipitation occurrance and amounts at the daily scale at scales linked to agricultural land-use and land-use change, starting at 10 km, to serve as daily input data to enable agricultural impact statistical analysis/ecosystem model-based assessment for future climate. This work extends previous work I have conducted on generating a historical climate database for Canada, involving an intercomparison of several spatial interpolation methods, and daily data from Environment Canada's station monitoring network.

This work is interlinked with several on-going research projects in my numerical laboratory seeking ways to improve the tracking of wet and dry cycles in soil moisture in agricultural landscapes, precipitation occurance and correlation patterns, and longer-term spatial trends related to climate teleconnections.

These research projects are funded under our Federal department's peer-reviewed, 'Sustainable Agricultural Environmental Systems (SAGES) Research Program'.

 
 
 

Amir Niazi

email: amniazi@gmail.com

I am a water resources researcher that work on impact analysis of climate change.

Research
My research would be working on different down-scaling methods and techniques and understanding its effect on groundwater resources management.

 
 
 

Robert Nicholas

email: rnicholas@atmos.washington.edu

graduate student in Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington


Research

In some previous work, I've explored drought recurrence and the prediction of winter-season rainfall for the Yaqui River basin of northwest Mexico. I'm interested in using NARCCAP data to re-examine this issue for projected climates of the late 21st century.

 
 
 

Kari Nielsen

email: nielsenk@cwu.edu

I am a graduate student at Central Washington University pursuing a Master's of Science in Resource Management. I am interested in geomorphology, GIS, and community based resource decisions.


Research

My research explores the spatial and temporal patterns of geomorphic hazards and their implications for recreational trails in the Many Glacier Valley in Glacier National Park, Montana. My researched focuses on five main objectives:

  1. identifying and mapping spatial and temporal patterns of past hazardous geomorphic events;
  2. determining the main spatial and temporal variables associated with past hazardous geomorphic events;
  3. identifying and mapping areas having potential for future hazardous geomorphic events based on variables found in objective 2;
  4. creating a seasonally sensitive geomorphic hazard map that incorporates recreational trails with past and potential future geomorphic events;
  5. making a management recommendation to the National Park Service (NPS) regarding trail management and hazards for the Many Glacier Valley.

 
 
 

Alex Nimusiima

email: animusiima@gmail.com

I am a PhD Student working in the area of climate change and crop production in Uganda. My main area of specialization is climate modelling.


Research

I am partnering with colleagues from South Dakota State University in USA to project crop yields at one of their agricultural sites from 2020 to 2100.

 
 
 

Rewati Niraula

email: rewatin@email.arizona.edu

I am a graduate student in the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources at the University of Arizona.


Research

I am investigating the impacts of climate change on the hydrology of semi-arid regions. I am planning to use the dynamically downscaled NARCCAP data for forcing the hydrologic model.

 
 
 

Farnaz Nojavan Asghari

email: fn7@duke.edu
website: http://fds.duke.edu/db/Nicholas/esp/grad/farnaz.nojavan

Farnaz Nojavan is a third year PhD student at Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. Prior to coming to Duke University, she earned a M.Sc. in Industrial Engineering-Operations Research (University of Florida).

Her research interests lie in the area of environmental decision-making under uncertainty, environmental system analysis, and estuarine ecosystems. Farnaz's current projects include:

  1. modeling Chlorophyll a in the New River Estuary in North Carolina using a Bayesian approach;
  2. Assessing the impact of nitrogen runoff from swine confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in North Carolina;
  3. method vs. preference learning in decision analytic preference assessment, and
  4. optimizing monitoring stations in the New River Estuary in North Carolina.

Her other professional activities include membership in the American Water Resource Association and the North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute.

Farnaz lives in Durham, NC with her husband Saed Alizamir, a PhD Student in Decision Sciences at Fuqua School of Business.


Research

I will use the NARCCAP predictions for regional climate change to investigate the impacts of climate change on estuarine ecosystem in mid-Atlantic estuarine.

 
 
 

Deborah Nolan

email: nolan@stat.berkeley.edu

Professor
Department of Statistics
University of California, Berkeley


Research

Interested in developing interactive visualizations with Google Earth. Climate data and models seems especially relevant to this sort of presentation.

Also, I have plans to use these data in teaching statistical computing and modern data analysis.

 
 
 

Michael Notaro

email: mnotaro@wisc.edu

I am an associate scientist at the Center for Climatic Research, UW-Madison. My areas of expertise include climate modeling and studying vegetation-climate interactions.

Research

My use of NARCCAP will involve the following:

  • Evaluate the simulations of the North American monsoons by NARCCAP.
  • Drive ecosystem models for modern and future vegetation/soil/fire simulations.

 
 
 

Douglas Nychka

email: nychka@ucar.edu
website: http://www.image.ucar.edu/~nychka

See my web page

Research

Density estimates will be applied to each grid box of daily surface precipitiation in the NCEP driven runs with an emphasis on estimating large quantiles accurately. Initially a logspline density estimate will used followed by a logspline modified to include Pareto tails. These probability densities will be smoothed and summarized over space using an EOF (or principal component) analysis. The spatial patterns of pdfs will be compared to NEXRAD daily precipitation composited over 12 years and at 20km gridded resolution.

The overall goal is to give a precise characterization as to how much information the daily precip distribution carries from the NARCCAP experiments. This work is in collaboration with Stephen Sain, IMAGe/NCAR.

 
 
 

Janet Nye

email: janetnye@gmail.com

I am an ecologist at the USEPA's Atlantic Ecology Division in Narragansett, RI. I am interested in the effects of climate variability and climate change on aquatic ecosystems and particularly on fish populations.

Research
I am interested in using NARCCAP data to project future changes in aquatic ecosystems in response to multiple stressors and the interaction of these stressors. I primarily model the abundance and distribution of marine and estuarine fish as functions of fishing, land use change, and climate variability.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Jayantha Obeysekera

email: jobey@sfwmd.gov
website: http://www.sfwmd.gov

Jayantha Obeysekera is the Director of the Hydrologic & Environmental Systems Modeling Department at the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), a regional governmental agency in South Florida, United States. This agency protects the water resources on behalf of 7.5 million South Floridians and it is responsible for water quality, flood control, water supply and environmental restoration in the South Florida region. SFWMD is also the lead agency in restoring Americas Everglades the largest environmental restoration project in the history of the United States. Dr. Obeysekera holds a bachelors degree in Civil Engineering from University of Sri Lanka, M. Eng. from University of Roorkee, India, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Colorado State University with specialization in water resources.


Research

A small technical team at SFWMD has been investigating the accuracy of GCMs as well as downscaled informaiton for the south Florida region. The results have been somewhat dissapointing since most models are not able to capture the landscape characteristics in the region as well as the physical mechanisms of climate in south Florida such as sea breeze. We are interested in NARCCAP data for possible use in our water resources planning investigations of the Everglades Restoration efforts.

 
 
 

Christopher O'Connor

email: oconnorc@email.arizona.edu

I am a Ph.D. Student at the University of Arizona School of Natural Resources and the Environment. My research interests and personal information are archived at: http://www.snr.arizona.edu/people/oconnor

Research
I am interested in landscape-scale modeling of interactions among natural and human caused disturbances and regional climate trends. I am looking to use down-scaled GCMs to provide the weather stream necessary to include past and future climate streams in a newly developed landscape modeling platform.

 
 
 

Robert J. Oglesby

email: roglesby2@unl.edu

Robert Oglesby is currently (since 2006) a Professor of Climate Modeling in the Department of Geosciences and the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Prior to that he was a Senior Research Scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center from 2001-2005, and an Assistant and Associate Professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Purdue University from 1992-2000. He obtained his PhD in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Yale University in 1990, working under Prof. Barry Saltzman. Robert has particular research interests in land surface-atmosphere interactions, particularly how soil moisture and snow cover may provide some predictability of precipitation on seasonal and longer time scales. He is also interested in the role of the hydrologic cycle in potential future climate change, especially at regional scales. Robert also using regional models to evaluate the potential climatic effects of land use changes, e.g., a large-scale transition from growing corn to growing switchgrass for biofuels.


Research

Increasingly, my research group has been using regional climate models. We have particular interests in the US Great Plains, Southeast, and Southwest. The models we primarily use are MM5 and WRF; our research collaborators also use the RSM. My goal for this workshop is not to come in with a specific need, but rather to gain a better understanding of the wide range of models used for NARCCAP, the datasets that have been produced, and how they may assist my group in our ongoing research projects.

 
 
 

Sarah O'Keefe

email: sarah.okeefe@ontario.ca

I work for the Ministry of the Environment in Ontario, Strategic Policy Branch, Ferguson Block 11th Floor, 77 Wellesley St. tel: 416-314-5603

Research
I am interested in exploring the data available on NARCCAP - especially precipitation data - in order to help inform decisions on what type of impact studies might be possible.

 
 
 

Sean O'Raw

email: sean.o'raw@aecom.com

I am a recent graduate of Urban and Regional studies, working with AECOM as a Junior Environmental Planner - GIS technician. Most of my work revolves around transportation environmental assessments and many other projects dealing with environmental studies.

Research
As a Junior Environmental Planner - GIS Technician, the usage of this data will centre around environmental assessments of government projects (transporation, sewage treatments, government buildings). For the most part, data I will be using will center around impacts to climate and precipitation of various areas of the world to track possible impacts from proposed undertakings. It is unlikly that I will be making contributions or additions to the data that I will request, as much of my work will focus on reporting and gathering information. This data will then be used in environmental reporting, mapping, and geodatabase creation for use in the decision making/recommendation process.

 
 
 

Luis Ortiz

email: luis.ortiz.uriarte@gmail.com

Graduated with a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of P.R.
Currently a Ph.D. student at City College of New York working with climate models with a focus on the NE USA.

Research
Title: On the mean and extreme climate trends of the NE as driven by decadal signals
This project deals with identifying trends of the NAO for past, present (1950-present) and future (2010-2100) climate conditions for the Northeast, and how these relate to general climate trends, such as precipitation, SSTs, Tmax/Tmin.
The project will require full understanding of these indexes for past, present and future, and for accessing temporal records from data for past-present, and from global circulation models for the future (up to 2100).
The key question to be answered by the research is - what may be the mean and extreme climate trends of the NE as driven by decadal signals?

 
 
 

Evan Oswald

email: dlawsonave@gmail.com

I am a post-doc researcher for the University of Vermont. I am an atmospheric scientist with a focus on climate and meteorology from an applied perspective.


Research

I am going to help different factions of the Vermont (USA) Agency of Natural Resources using higher resolution climate data. Vermont has a complex topography and thus high resolution data is essential. For example, they need information regarding air temperatures in valley regions.

 
 
 

Tinghai Ou

email: tinghai.ou@gu.se

I'm a PhD student in the Earth Science Center, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Research title: Variation and changing of extreme climate events in China


Research

My research mainly aims at understanding the historic variation in extreme climate events, the possible influence factors which may lead to changes in extreme events in China and the changing of extreme climate events with the changing of climate.

Research methods:

  1. Correlation coefficient will be calculated to examine the relation between extreme events and circulation index
  2. EOF will be used to examine the pattern of circulation
  3. Weather classification will be used to examine daily circulation

Research plans:

  1. Analyzing daily instrument data set, examining the characters of extreme events in China
  2. Explain the variation of extreme climate events
    1. Reanalysis data sets and instrument data sets will be used to build the connection between extreme climate events and circulation
    2. Using model simulated 20th century data sets to examine the relationship found in previous step
  3. Model simulated 21th century scenarios will be used to examine the future changing of extreme events based on the work of step 2

NARCCAP data will be used for examining the relation found in instruments data sets. And the data will be used to analyze the future change of extreme climate events. We will also use results from papers comparing Asia and North America.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Lauren Padilla

email: lauren.e.padilla@gmail.com

I'm an environmental modeler and researcher at Stone Environmental, Inc. studying climate change impacts on hydrology in watershed models.


Research

I will be using NARCCAP data to study impacts on hydrology in watershed models like the SWAT model. I'm particularly interested in the impact of increased precipitation on erosion risk and associated uncertainties.

 
 
 

Debasish Pai Mazumder

email: debasish@ucar.edu
website: http://staff.ucar.edu/users/debasish

Debasish PaiMazumder, PhD
Postgraduate Scientist
Regional Climate Research Section
NCAR Earth System Laboratory
P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000
Tel 303 497 8228

Research interest: Extreme events in the context of climate change


Research

Drought characteristics and associated uncertainties over the United States in a changing climate as simulated by regional climate models, like NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Sujan Pal

email: sujanju2014@gmail.com

I am an researcher at SDS lab of Northeastern University, Boston, USA and I need to download data from NARCAAP for research purpose.


Research

My research is on evaluation of precipitation extreme and uncertainty quantification.

 
 
 

Zaitao Pan

email: panz@eas.slu.edu
website: http://www.eas.slu.edu/People/ZPan

Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Science. St. Louis University.

My research focuses on regional climate changes, mesoscale phenomena, land surface processes, and ecosystem modeling.


Research

The project is to understand and quantify how critical ecosystem structure, functioning, and climate feedbacks in agroecosystems will be affected by climate changes. Carbon dynamics and its change play key roles in maintaining the system health and sustainability under changing climate. The gridded climate change data generated by the global and regional model suite will be used to drive ecosystem models and to evaluate carbon flows among different pools in the agroecosystem.

 
 
 

Albert Parker

email: ajparker@uga.edu

Professor Emeritus, Department of Geography, University of Georgia.

Research interests: biogeography, forest dynamics, dendroclimatology


Research

We are using dendrochronological techniques to establish baseline climate/growth relationships for a 150+ year old stand of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) located on the Wormsloe State Historical Site near Savannah, Georgia. We have extracted paired cores from a set of 35 trees, processed them with standard techniques, and built reliable chronologies based on earlywood, latewood, and total annual ring meansurements. Climate modeling employed DENDROCLIM to assess correlations and response surface prospects for a set of monthly (current growing season and previous growing season) values for precipitation, mean temperature, and Palmer Drought Severity Index.

We are requesting NARCCAP data to explore implications of our findings with respect to future climate change scenarios.

 
 
 

Risa Patarasuk

email: risajook@ufl.edu


Research
I am working as part of PINEMAP project.
PINEMAP focuses on the 20 million acres of planted pine forests managed by private landowners in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal states from Virginia to Texas, plus Arkansas and Oklahoma. These forests provide critical economic and ecological services to U.S. citizens. Southeastern forests contain 1/3 of the contiguous U.S. forest carbon and form the backbone of an industry that supplies 16% of global industrial wood, 5.5% of the jobs, and 7.5% of the industrial economic activity of the region.
PINEMAP integrates research, extension, and education to enable southern pine landowners to manage forests to increase carbon sequestration; increase efficiency of nitrogen and other fertilizer inputs; and adapt forest managment approaches to increase forest resilience and sustainability under variable climates.

 
 
 

Christina Patricola

email: cmd58@cornell.edu

Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Cornell University
3152 Snee Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853

My advisor is Kerry H. Cook, who is a professor in the department of Geological Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Email: kc@jsg.utexas.edu


Research

Project title: Central United States climate in the mid-twenty-first century: Regional climate model simulations

The purpose of this project is to assess changes in seasonal rainfall, drought and flood events, near-surface air temperature, heat index, and atmospheric circulation over the central United States for the mid-twenty-first century. We have run regional climate simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model for the time periods 1981-2000 and 2041-2060. Lateral boundary conditions for the control simulation are prescribed from reanalysis products, and lateral boundary conditions for the future are created by adding linearly interpolated monthly anomalies from AOGCMs to the 6-hourly reanalysis data. We would like to compare our results with those from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), which employs the direct downscaling method by prescribing lateral boundary conditions to a regional model directly from a global model. We plan to use precipitation, temperature, humidity, and wind output from Phase II of the NARCCAP. We are particularly interested in better understanding how the treatment of lateral boundary conditions impacts the simulation of present day and future regional climate.

 
 
 

Sabu Paul

email: spaul@mbakercorp.com

I work at Michael Baker Corporation as Water Resource Project Manager.

Research
I am working on a research project to quantify the effect of climate change on various storm drainage systems. I am planning to use EPA's SWMM model for the initial analysis. I am particularly interested in the cost associated with the mitigation effort. We will be analyzing the NARCCAP data for planning purposes.

 
 
 

Peter Peller

email: ppeller@ucalgary.ca

Head of the Spatial and Numeric Data Services centre at the University of Calgary.


Research

I am currently working with a veterinary medicine researcher who is looking at parasite infestations in musk ox in the Canadian Arctic. We would like to use temperature data to determine potential locations of a parasite.

 
 
 

Wenjun Peng

email: Wenjun.Peng@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Research Assistant Ocean Sciences Division, Bedford Institute of Oceanography Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2,Canada

Research
The data we want to download from your website will include 3-hourly or daily wind speed data, near sea temperature, precipitation and humidity etc.. And they will be driving the regional ocean models.
We expect this approach to provide quantitative estimates of regional ocean climate and variability for a period of ~100 years at high resolution. In this manner, we will be able to quantify possible future climate change for ocean variables including temperature, salinity, stratification, ocean transport etc..

 
 
 

José Luis Pérez López

email: jolperez@tlaloc.imta.mx

Jose Luis Perez Lopez is a Physicist of the Faculty (Power) of Sciences of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). From 2000 he received his Master Sciences in Atmospheric Physics at the Posgrado of Sciences of the Earth of the UNAM in 2000. Currently he is a student of doctorate in Atmospheric Physics inside the Posgrado of Sciences of the Earth of the UNAM. Since 2001 he is a researcher associated in Hidrometeorología's department of the Mexican Institute of Technology of the Water (IMTA). Jose Luis' thesis works has been on the generation of scenes (stages) of climatic change of rain and temperature for Mexico SRES 92 (1997), and on the simulation of the regional climate in the center of Mexico using the model MM5 (2000). His topics of interest are to study the climatic regional variability of Mexico and the interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean as part of the processes that determine the regional climate. In 2007 initiate together with the Dr. Montero the evaluation of the scenarios of climatic regional change for Mexico applying the algorithm REA of Giorgi and L. Mearns, considering the ensamble models that they took part in 4th report of the IPCC. Jose Luis possesses skills in the processing and analysis of meteorological and climatological information, also in the experimental design of diagnosis, forecast in real time and of sensibility experiments for changes in the landuse in several Mexican regions.


Research

With the information of NARCCAP we will use them to evaluate the anticipated impacts on the sector of water resources of the north of my country. In October 2007, he was in contact with Seth McGinnis, expressed that his group of work needs to generate the regional scenarios according to NARCCAP's plan, but for the whole region of Mexico, the Caribe and Central America, he defined it as Mesoamerica's domain. For the present Dr. Montero and Jose Luis are initiating the process of obtaining the scenes (stages) A2 and A1B of climatic change for Mesoamerica's region using the models MM5/WRF to a scale of 40 Kms.

 
 
 

Danae Perry

email: danae.np@knights.ucf.edu
website: http://fedorka.cos.ucf.edu/

M.S. Student
PI - Ken Fedorka
Biology Department
University of Central Florida
4000 Central Florida Boulevard
Orlando, Florida 32816
Biology Building Room 412


Research

I will investigate how a changing climate will affect insect immune system function by quantifying (i) how immune function is affected after rearing multiple generations within a controlled environment experiencing thermal changes and (ii) what role seasonality plays within this evolutionary dynamic. I will rear Drosophila melanogaster under a simulated changing thermal environment using projected climate data, and quantify their melanin levels and immune function.

The potential for global shifts in parasite-host interaction accompanying climate change is an extremely important field of study. The objectives of my proposal are twofold. These objectives will address the effect of climate change on insect immune systems, and whether this will cause a selective pressure for a less immunocompetent phenotype.

Objective I – Quantify the effect on immune function of rearing multiple generations of Drosophila melanogaster under new temperature regimes through analysis of mortality rates post-infection and melanization comparisons.

Objective II - Determine what role seasonality plays within this evolutionary dynamic.

I am currently in search of data to use to inform my thermal treatments. I need regional climate model data for Orlando, Fl for a 100 year period (2000-2100) with monthly averages, minimums, and maximums.

 
 
 

Lia Pervin

email: plia@ualberta.ca

I am a PhD student in the university of Alberta, Canada, department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. I was an assistant professor in the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka. My key research interest is Climate Change and Hydrology and currently I am working on similar type of project.


Research

Water resources of the Mackenzie River Basin (MRB) area are of key interest to Canada. The Mackenzie River is also a highly active transportation corridor for residents; most people living along the river travel by snowmobile on the ice cover in winter, and by personal watercraft in the summer. In other words, the water levels of the Mackenzie River play a major role to the transportation of the northern communities of NWT. Under expected climate change scenarios, the streamflow and water levels of the Mackenzie River are expected to change. Hydrologic impacts of climate change on the Mackenzie River will have important implications for river transportation both along and across the Mackenzie River. This research work is directed at predicting these potential hydrologic impacts of climate change on the on water levels of the Mackenzie River. To achieve this, hydroclimatic data are needed of the Mackenzie River Basin; calibrate and validate a land surface scheme (distributed hydrologic model) MISBA, with necessary modifications so that it will accurately simulate water levels of the Mackenzie River at selected stations. After validating the simulated water levels with historical data, MISBA will be forced with future SRES climate scenarios of IPCC projected by seven general circulation models for the Mackenzie to estimate the potential climate change impacts on its future water levels.

 
 
 

Thomas Pfaff

email: tpfaff@ithaca.edu
website: http://www.ithaca.edu/tpfaff

Tom Pfaff is an associate professor of mathematics at Ithaca College in Ithaca, NY. His research interests include incorporating sustainability themes (climate change, energy security, etc) into mathematics classrooms to better engage students and to educate them about important current issues. Projects that have already been developed can be found here: http://www.ithaca.edu/tpfaff/sustainability.htm

Research
The main research goal at this time is to use the data for better examples and exercises in statistics courses.

 
 
 

Ian Pfingsten

email: ianp@appliedeco.org


Research

My goal is to develop population models of rare plant species in the Pacific North West. The models should include environmental covariates to link the population vital rates to changing climates. A population viability assessment can then be done based on correlated environments to determine long-term extinction risk for each species.

 
 
 

Aaron Philippsen

email: aaronp@uvic.ca

I'm a masters student in Mechanical engineering at the University of Victoria.

Research
I study bioenergy, and I hope to use NARCCAP data to evaluate the performance of solar thermal biomass drying systems in British Columbia.

 
 
 

Tom Phillips

email: phillips14@llnl.gov

Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Mail Stop L-103
7000 East Avenue
Livermore, California 94551


Research

This request for NARCCAP regional model data is made on behalf of a research project for "Enhancing California's Water Decision Support System", a collaborative effort by scientists at the Los Angeles and Irvine campuses of the University of California (UCI and UCLA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the California Department of Water Resources (CDWR)*.

Because water resources in California are very sensitive to seasonal, regional, and orographic characteristics, they are especially vulnerable to prospective 21st century climate change. Making the necessary adjustments in future water supply and demand thus requires careful planning. Hence, our research goals are:

  1. to make methodological improvements in the State of California's water management model CalSim-II, so as to enhance future resource planning capabilities; and
  2. to conduct a risk assessment of the potential impacts on California's water resources of various model projections of 21st century climate change.

Achieving our first goal will entail developing improved techniques for statistically downscaling regional climate model (RCM) simulations of daily surface climate (esp. precipitation and temperature) over California. (The RCM simulations will include several runs made expressly for our project, as well as others obtained from data archives such as that of NARCCAP.) Our statistical downscaling procedure will utilize empirical orthogonal function (EOF) representations of surface variables to map data from the ~30-50 kilometer scales of the typical RCM to the ~ 1/8-degree resolution that is required to drive an impacts model for predicting the hydrology (e.g. runoff, streamflow, evapo-transpiration, soil moisture) of California's diverse watersheds. In turn, these land hydrology predictions will provide needed inputs for the CalSim-II water management model. The accuracy of our statistical downscaling method will depend on the availability of high-quality, fine-resolution observational data for constructing EOF error models under different California climatic regimes. For example, PERSIANN, a UCI fine-resolution merged gauge and remote-sensing precipitation product (http://hydis.eng.uci.edu/gwadi/), will be used for this purpose.

Because the response of the hydrological impacts model will depend on both the specified climate-change emissions scenarios and the available RCM simulations, an ensemble of scenario- and RCM-specific downscaled inputs will be supplied to both the impacts model and to CalSim-II, and a corresponding ensemble of water resource outcomes will be obtained. Hydrological and water-resource response uncertainties (including inherent model errors) then will be manifested by the scatter about the ensemble means at each link in this modeling chain. Our statistical analysis of these ensembles will attempt to quantify the respective uncertainty components as the starting point for an assessment of the risk to future California water resources under different climate-change scenarios.

Both our bias-correction/downscaling methodology and climate-change risk assessment will benefit from utilizing as many RCM simulations of climate-change scenarios as can be readily obtained for the Western U.S. Thus, the NARCCAP data will supply essential resources for achieving our research goals.

*Project participants include principal investigator S. Sorooshian of UCI and co-investigators X. Gao (UCI), J. Kim (UCLA), C. Tong and T. Phillips (LLNL), and F. Chung and J. Anderson (CDWR).

 
 
 

David Pierce

email: dpierce@ucsd.edu

Division of Climate, Atmospheric Sciences, and Physical Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA

Research
The intent is to examine changes in hydrology and water resources in the western U.S.

 
 
 

Vincent Poitras

email: poitras@rhea.ouranos.ca

  • B.Sc. Physics, University of Montreal, 2003
  • M.Sc. Physics, University of Montreal, 2006
  • M.Sc. Atmospherical Sciences, University of Québec at Montreal

Research

Title: Assessment of climate-change impacts on Canadian water resources using Regional Climate Model projections

Abstract: Climate change will have significant impacts on water resources around the world due to the close connection between climate and the hydrologic cycle. Canada has some of the largest freshwater reserves in the world. The stability of these freshwater reserves to regional climate change is clearly an important concern for Canada requiring detailed and reliable information. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) with their complete closed water budget including both the atmospheric and land surface branches are ideal tools for this purpose. This proposal will analyse the impact of climate change on the annual and seasonal characteristics of hydro-meteorological variables that determine water availability, across Canada, using an ensemble of RCMs and their transient climate simulations for a range of plausible emission scenarios. To study the impact of climate change on streamflows, we propose to use a river system model, to model streamflows for current and future climate states. We also propose to assess projected changes to the frequency and magnitude of extreme hydro-meteorological events such as floods and droughts. Provision of detailed nation-wide information of climate-change impacts on water resources and estimates of future water availability, based on an ensemble of state-of-the-art RCMs will be an important deliverable of this project. These results will be communicated to the climate impacts community and made available for further study into the ecological and social consequences of these changes.

 
 
 

Pruek Pongprueksa

email: pruekpps@yahoo.com

Postdoctoral Associate at Cornell University (2007-2008)
Postdoctoral Researcher at Lamar University (2008-Present)

Research Interests:

  • Chemical transport modeling (e.g. Ozone, PM, and mercury)
  • Mesoscale weather forecast modeling
  • Climate change


Research

Main Research Goals:
Quantify climate change impacts to mercury pollution and acid deposition.

Research plan:
Use IPCC scenarios as regional meteorological model input and then use derived data to simulate in chemical transport model.

 
 
 

Shannon Poole

email: spoole@usgs.gov


Research
I'm with the USGS water science department and we hope to use the NARCCAP data with the National Water Balance Model and the Precipitation and Runoff Modeling System which use existing data to predict future conditions.

 
 
 

John Posey

email: john.posey@ewgateway.org

Member of the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee, lead author NCA transportation section.

Research
I work for the East-West Gateway Council of Governments, which is the Metropolitan Planning Organization for the St. Louis region. We are currently crafting a Regional Plan for Sustainable Development, which we hope will include a climate change adaptation plan. I hope to use NARCCAP data to help visualize potential changes in temperature and precipitation for the St. Louis region.

 
 
 

Jerry Potter

email: glpotter@umich.edu

I retired from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where I helped organize and manage the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) and now I work part-time for the University of Michigan, NASA GSFC, and U.C Davis.

Research
We are assessing the usability of climate output information for a study which involves a workflow design. The NARCCAP data is a set that is often used by students and researchers and we are interested in how it is made available for input to end-users who aren't often climate scientists.

 
 
 

Vara Prasad

email: vara@ksu.edu

I am a faculty at Kansas State University interested in (a) understanding the impacts of climate change factors on crop production; and (b) using crop simulation models to improve crop management practices for efficient use of inputs.

Contact Address:

P.V. Vara Prasad
Associate Professor - Crop Ecophysiology
Department of Agronomy
2004 Throckmorton Hall
Kansas State University
Manhattan, KS 66506


Research

Objective of research is to examine the impact of climate variability on crop production in the Ogallala Aquifer region. Crop simulation models would be applied using future GHG emission scenarios. Most assessments of impacts of climate change on agriculture have applied climate scenarios from General Circulation Model (GCM) with a coarse resolution to point-based or regional agricultural model. There is huge literature evidence that direct outputs from GCM are largely inadequate for regional scale impact analysis. Regional climate models (RCM) provide fine scale climate scenarios and is reported to respond more realistically to model simulation. In this research study we would be applying the RCM and DSSAT crop model to simulate the impact on four major crops (winter wheat, sorghum, cotton and corn) grown in Ogallala region. Further the research would look into the adaptation strategies required to handle the climate change situation by testing various agricultural management options. Finally this research would provide critical information needed to help decision/policy makers to device long-term strategies to cope climate variability and change.

 
 
 

Sarah Praskievicz

email: praskiev@uoregon.edu

I am a second-year Ph.D. student in the geography department at the University of Oregon. My research focuses on the impacts of climate change on water resources, with a regional emphasis on the Pacific Northwest.


Research

Research Goals: I propose to research the question: how do projected climate-driven hydrological changes influence the channel morphology of river systems at multiple scales in a diversity of Pacific Northwest basins? The question can be hierarchically subdivided into changes in climate, hydrology, and geomorphology:

  • Climate: changes in magnitude, intensity, and form of precipitation
  • Hydrology: changes in magnitude, frequency, and seasonality of peak flows
  • Geomorphology: changes in total basin suspended sediment transport and reach-scale width-to-depth ratios and sinuosity

Research Methods/Plan: I will select three basins in the Pacific Northwest that are similar in their size and topography but have varying climatic and geological characteristics (potential candidate basins include the John Day and Siuslaw rivers in Oregon and the Palouse River in Washington). Other criteria are that study rivers should be geomorphically responsive to hydrologic change (i.e. sand- or gravel-bed rather than bedrock substrate) and should be undammed. I will use the NARCCAP scenarios to generate and evaluate scenarios of anthropogenic climate change for each basin. To validate the RCM results for my study basins, I will validate them using NCARs North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset for 1979-2004.

Once I have validated the NARCCAP scenarios and generated scenarios of temperature and precipitation change for my study basins, I will use these scenarios to drive the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a basin-scale semi-distributed hydrologic model developed by the United States Department of Agriculture. Since this model is based on many adjustable empirically derived parameters, I will first calibrate and validate it using a split sample of observational discharge records from United States Geological Survey (USGS) gages on each river. When the models fit is sufficient, I will alter the climatic inputs according to the climate change scenarios to simulate changes in the magnitude, frequency, and seasonality of peak flows, relative to simulated historical flows.

The final step in the modeling chain will be to examine how the hydrological changes resulting from climate change will affect fluvial geomorphology in my study basins. To accomplish this, I will use the Cellular Automaton Evolutionary Slope and River model, which simulates flow and sediment transport at basin and reach scales. I will model sediment transport and geomorphology at both these scales. First I will validate the model using turbidity data from USGS gages, a proxy for suspended sediment concentration, and remote sensing images of channel form. To simulate how suspended sediment transport may be affected by climate-driven hydrological changes, I will then model total suspended sediment load for each river at the basin scale. To understand how channel morphology may be affected by the hydrologic changes, I will simulate selected reaches to project changes in cross-section and sinuosity. The resulting changes in total suspended sediment transport and channel morphology will reflect the potential impacts of climate change in the different basins.

Data: I will use the NARRCAP scenarios as a source of projected changes in mean, maximum, and minimum temperature, total precipitation, relative humidity, wind speed, and potentially other climatic variables for my study areas.

Significance: Although the impacts of anthropogenic climate change on basin-scale hydrology have been extensively explored, relatively little is known about how these changes will impact fluvial geomorphology, including total sediment transport, width-to-depth ratios, and sinuosity. It is important to understand these processes because river channels dynamically adjust to hydrologic changes. Developing methods for predicting geomorphic responses to a range of climate change scenarios will enable land managers to develop adaptation plans that protect the economic, cultural, and ecological benefits provided by river systems. This research will also contribute to understanding of the processes governing interactions among climate, hydrology, and geomorphology at multiple scales.

 
 
 

Pat Prodanovic

email: pprodano@gmail.com

I am a water resources engineer with an interest in response of environmental systems to climate change.

Research
I plan to use NARCCAP data in site specific assessment of riverine flooding for the watersheds of Ontario, Canada. I also plan to apply the NARCCAP data to drive circulation and wave models used in identification of site specific coastal hazards on the Canadian shores of the Great Lakes.

 
 
 

Aaron Pruitt

email: ahpruitt@wisc.edu


Research
I will be using NARCCAP data in a project to understand the effects of climate change on watersheds in northern Wisconsin. I will use forecast and backcast temperature and precipitation outputs from NARCCAP models to drive a soil-water balance model to obtain estimates of recharge. Once I've got recharge estimates, I will use those values to drive a groundwater flow model of a small watershed in the Chequamegon National Forest in northern Wisconsin. I will also use historic climate records to drive a soil-water balance model and groundwater flow model. I will compare the three sets of groundwater flow model results (backcast, forecast and historic record) to understand how climate change might affect these small forested watersheds.

 
 
 

Sara Pryor

email: spryor@indiana.edu
website: http://php.indiana.edu/~spryor

I am a Professor of Atmospheric Science at Indiana University.

Research

The purpose of my research is to evaluate RCMs in terms of their simulation of historical variability and trends in near-surface winds, and projections of future wind climate. The methods include Kendalls tau statistics, bootstrapping, fitting of probability distributions (Weibull and Gumbel), and probabilistic downscaling. The output variables I am most interested in are wind component, sea level pressure fields and vorticity (derived or direct output). The research is funded by NSF.

 
 
 

Amy Pryse-Phillips

email: amyprysephillips@hotmail.com

2003 - B.A.Sc. University of Waterloo (Environmental Engineering)
2003 to Present - Hatch (Hydrotechnical Engineer)
2003 to Present - Part time M.Eng. studies at Memorial University of Newfoundland (Civil Engineering)


Research

The objective of my research is to estimate the effect of climate change on the hydroelectric potential of the lower Churchill River in Labrador, Canada. For my Masters thesis, I am setting up and calibrating a WATFLOOD hydrological model of several gauged sub-basins of the Lower Churchill River. The next step will be to develop some sort of climate changed inputs (likely using the delta method) which will be run through this calibrated hydrological model to obtain an estimate of the change in water availability in the basin over the next century.

There are no climate observations from within the sub-basins that I'm modeling and therefore I am interested in obtaining other climate data series such as NARCCAP to potentially use for model calibration, depending on the agreement between NARCAPP and observations at the station locations.

Jonas Roberts is also part of the research group, and he is focussing on regional climate modeling of the same basin.

 
 
 

Bing Pu

email: bp247@cornell.edu

Ph.D. Candidate, Cornell University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences;
Visiting student at the the University of Texas at Austin.
Advisor: Professor Kerry H. Cook


Research

We use a regional climate model WRF to explore climate variations over North America under a hypothetical shutdown of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during 2081-2100. Our present day simulations (1981-2000) are driven by the NCEP II reanalysis. For the validation, we compared our results with the North American Regional Reanalysis. While major features of the rainfall field in AMJ and JAS are captured by the model, over the central U.S. rainfall is underestimated, and over the eastern U.S. it is overestimated. We?d like to further compare our results with the NARCCAP regional model simulations driven by the NCEP II reanalysis or the AOGCM output in order to better evaluate our simulations.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Dongzhi Qi

email: Dongzhi.Qi@agr.gc.ca

Agri-Environment Services Branch,Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada 408-1800 Hamilton St. Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 4L2

Research
My main research goals are exploring the relationship between precipitation and forage yield in prairies. I will be using is the precipitation data from 1985 to the present. By statistical analysis, we will find the correlation between the two factors. This analysis is useful for making management decisions to deal with the drought.

 
 
 

Lingqiao Qi

email: qilingqiaow@gmail.com

I am a Ph.D student at UConn. My major is agriculture economics, focusing on the climate change of agriculture productivity.


Research

I will use this data to examine how the climate change, the temperature and rain change will focus on agriculture productivity. Specifically, I will divide the climate change effects into three dimensions: long-term, short term, and extreme weather, and will use different measurement to define the climate change at each term.

 
 
 

Budong Qian

email: Budong.Qian@agr.gc.ca

Agroclimatologist
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Ottawa, ON, Canada
Telephone 1-613-759-1641


Research

We are using crop growth models, such as CERES crop models in DSSAT, for evaluating climate change impacts on agricultural production in Canada. These models require daily climate as inputs at local scale. We have been using a stochastic weather generator to downscale GCM simulated climate change scenarios based on CGCM3 and HadCM3 climate change experiments. We are interested in making comparison between our daily climate scenarios generated by the weather generator and the outputs of the CGCM3+CRCM and HadCM3+HRM3 runs from NARCCAP, especially extreme daily values. We are also interested in evaluating the potential of using these regional model outputs as input to crop models to find out whether further downscaling from the regional climate models is still needed or not. These findings may be useful to the climate change impact studies community who needs daily climate scenarios in high resolution.

 
 
 

Lei Qiao

email: leiqiao1981@gmail.com

PhD candidate at Saint Louis U.


Research

Floods have been the major natural hazard in the Upper Mississippi river and Lower Missouri river valleys. Within the past nearest 30 years, the Mississippi and Missouri flood plains have experienced several large floods (1973, 1993, and 2008). It has been proposed that the flood threat is increasing either by climate change or land cover/use change and river engineering along the big rivers (Mississippi, Missouri and Illinois rivers) and their tributaries.

NARCCAP provides downscale products including necessary atmospheric driven forces for hydrological models. It will be used to study hydrologic variability and floods characteristics in the past and future climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Xin Qiu

email: xinqiu@yorku.ca

As the Principal of Novus Environmental Inc., I have over 20 years of experience in meteorological, climatological modelling and air quality. I earned a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at York University in 2002, and is certified as Accredited Consulting Meteorologist (ACM) by the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society (CMOS), and entitled as Environmental Professional (EP) on Air Quality by ECO Canada. I am an Adjunct Professor of York University leading a climate change and advanced downscaling research project for Government of Ontario and Environment Canada. I am an IPCC Expert Reviewer on the new IPCC 2012 SERX Report of "Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation". I am also an invited member of the expert panel for reviewing climate change and air quality studies for US EPA (STAR Program. My additional contact email address at Novus is xinq@novusenv.com


Research

As PI of a research project at York University (granted by Ministry of Environment Ontario), I am looking into using NARCCAP's both GCMs and RCMs to downscale 45km grid resolution via statistical probabilistic method. The purpose of the approach is to have a better understanding of the relationships between GCMs and RCMs and apply the correlations between GCMs/RCMs to future years projection. Furthermore, we are looking into the changes in climate extremes which are challenges to many climate change researchers. We anticipate to estimate future climate extremes, mainly on heat waves, extreme precipitations and extreme humidity (Humidex) in North America by using NARCCAP GCM/RCM data at the grid resolution of 45km.

 
 
 

Yu QiWei

email: qyu@ust.hk

I am Yu QiWei, a Mphil student from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. As my research interest is climate change(adaptation), I would like to download some climate projection data to process the regional analysis for south China.

Research
The main goal of my research work is to explore the climate change impact on China and Pearl River Delta (PRD). Firstly, I will comprehensively categorize the impact of climate change from a global view. Then, this work will specified focusing on the impact for China and PRD region, such as heatwaves and flooding, etc. Quantitatively, I will dig into the observation data in terms of (max) temperature, precipitation, and sea level rise using statistical method (extreme value theory, time series analysis, spatial-temporal analysis, etc). Subsequently, I will compare the observational data with reanalysis which obtained from NCEP. Finally, the work will research on the future pattern using the projection data which get from IPCC different scenarios and also NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Frederick Quaye

email: fmq0001@auburn.edu

PhD Student (Applied Economics)
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36830


Research

The anticipated NARCCAP data to be downloaded include temperature and precipitation values for the US, for a 40-year starting from 1972 to 2011. The data would be used in addition to a farm level data to analyze the impact of climate change on agriculture in the Southeastern states of the US. The study would also make projections as to the expected gains or losses to farmers using simulations in the years ahead. This study is part of my research requirement as a PhD student.

 
 
 

Mason Quick

email: mgquick@email.arizona.edu

I am a graduate student in the Atmospheric Science dept. at the University of Arizona.

Research
I am assisting in a project that will use basic atmospheric variables such as temperature, humidity, and precipitation amount as input to a geographical model in an attempt to quantify the effect of future climate change on agricultural productivity.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Shannon Rabideau

email: shannon.rabideau@gmail.com


Research

I am a student at Iowa State University, continuing the research that graduated senior Theresa Andersen has done.

Borrowing from her information:

Main research goals

  • determine if climate models indicate any seasonal, diurnal, and multi-year trends in wind speeds
  • determine if the model wind speed trends are similar to the observed
  • motivated by research done by Pryor et al. where observed trends show wind speeds are generally decreasing across the US

Research methods

  • ncdump data from netcdf files
  • write fortran programs to extract data (particular hours and/or gridpoints)
  • use ferret to plot data and analyze trends

Research plan
Currently analyzing MM5 wind speed data. Would like to expand the study to include the other NARCCAP models wind speed output

What data are needed
Surface wind speed data from RSM, and other levels and/or models if time permits.

Anticipated findings or significance of work
The models pick up the significant time history trends and seasonal trends; the models do not represent the diurnal trends well

My research differs from Theresa's as I plan to analyze CRCM output wind speed data and then analyze other NARCCAP model output wind speed data as time permits. My data needs include surface wind speed data from CRCM and other levels and/or models as time permits.

 
 
 

Zivorad Radonjic

email: zradonjic@senes.ca
website: http://www.senes.ca

Senior Environmental Meteorologist
SENES Consultants Ltd.
121 Granton Drive Unit 12
Richmond Hill, Ontario
905-764-9380x347
905-764-9386- fax

We are generally interested in regional climate modeling and dynamical downscaling to study future climate impacts on weather systems over Toronto Area- Ontario.


Research

Our research goals at the highest level include quantifying the impacts of future climate change on the weather, design parameters for the City canalization, power demend, heating and air-conditioning over Grater Toronto Area (~ 150 km).. We plan to use the NARCCAP data to initialize the NMM meso-scale weather model and show the impact of weather systems (storms, thunder-storms, heavy rain etc) on the City level. (Horizontal resolution of the modeling will be on 1 by 1 km scale). Our research should help to address these questions and to provide estimates of how future weather extremes will affect the economies of the City of Toronto.

 
 
 

Audrey Rager

email: arager@usgs.gov


Research
We are working on species distribution models for multiple species in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of the Southwestern USA. These models include predictions of habitat change under differing climate scenarios. I hope to use NARCCAP data to improve these models and inform current and future land management policies for conservation of desert biodiversity.

 
 
 

Masihur Rahman

email: bdmasi@yahoo.com

I am working as a researcher at the University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. I am interested in hydrology and watershed modelling.


Research

I am conducting a study to predict the impact of climate change on hydrology and water quality of the Canard River Watershed within the Southern Ontario, Canada. I need the NARCCAP data from the simulation of different RCMs in order to run the hydrologic and water quality model under the projected climate scenarios. The findings of the study will help in developing water management plan for the Canard River watershed under the changing climate conditions.

 
 
 

Mohammed Rahman

email: mohammed.rahman@ndsu.edu

I am working on impact of tile drainage on the water resources of the Red River Basin; and for future scenario analysis, I will use NARCCAP data. Research interests: -Watershed modeling, Application of GIS/Remote sensing in hydrology, water resources management, and Desing of Irrigation/Drainage systems

Research
I have developed the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model for the Upper Red River of the North Basin (URRNB), USA and now I am trying to analyze the impacts of emerging tile drainage on streamflows in the URRNB. The model was calibrated and validated against the various required observed data for the period of 1990 to 2009. The GIS based (Geographic Information Systems) decision tree classification method was employed to map the extent of present and future tile drainage coverage. At this stage of the research, future imapcts of tile drainage on the basin's water resources, more importantly on the streamflows, will be simulated and analyzed. As precipitation and temperature are the two basic inputs to the model, NARCCAP data are being expected to be used in scenario analysis by this model. The final outcome of this modeling work will help the policy makers to formulate an effective strategy for regional water resources management.

 
 
 

Jorge A Ramirez

email: ramirez@engr.colostate.edu
website: http://www.engr.colostate.edu/ce/facultypage.cfm?pass=26

_____________ Jorge A. Ramirez, Ph.D. Professor Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Director, I-WATER Program http://I-WATER.ColoState.edu/ Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1372 970.491.7621 http://www.engr.colostate.edu/ce/facultypage.cfm?pass=26

Research
Estimating the vulnerability of US water supply to shortage for the period 2000-2100 accounting for climate variability and change.

IGERT OVERVIEW
Four major research themes serve as the foundation for WATER-IGERT at CSU addressing research questions at the interfaces between (see schematic):

Theme I Hydrologic, Atmospheric, and Ecologic systems (HAE): 1. Coupling atmospheric, ecologic, and hydrologic processes: understanding the two-way interactions between atmospheric and land-surface processes is critical to understanding climate change, vegetation function, and watershed hydrology. 2. Spatial and temporal scaling issues in hydrologic processes.

Theme II Hydrologic, Ecologic, and Socio-economic systems (HES): 1. Defining changes in water, nutrients and sediment transports due to variability and change in climate/weather, land cover/land use, and water resources management. 2. Developing models to optimize 2. ecosystem resilience and human economic activity that bear on the hydrologic cycle at regional scales

Theme III Hydrologic, Atmospheric, and Socio-economic systems (HAS): 1. Regional, integrated assessment of vulnerability of hydrologic and water resource systems, ecologic, and socio-economic systems to environmental variability and climate change. The fourth Research Theme arises from the need for integration and synthesis:

Theme IV WATER-Research integration and synthesis 1. Trade-offs, alternative solutions, adaptation strategies, global feedbacks, global integration.

 
 
 

Imtiaz Rangwala

email: rangwala@marine.rutgers.edu

Imtiaz Rangwala
Research Associate
Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences
Rutgers University
71 Dudley Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Research Interests: High elevation climate change, impacts of climate change on stream flow.


Research

Current research interests include making improvements in our understanding of recent past and future climate changes at higher elevations (>9,000 ft) in the Upper Colorado Basin, where a majority of snowpack exist. In particular, I am analyzing NARCCAP outputs, which involves doing complete seasonal surface energy balance for each simulation to (a) understand causes for surface temperature changes - particularly the minimum and maximum temperatures, and (b) evaluate each simulation for the representation of physical processes and their consistency with observations. The 20th century output will be compared against high elevation observation stations (e.g. SNOTEL) and PRISM temperature data. This study will provide improvements in climate projection inputs for the Upper Colorado Basin to be used by Reclamation planning tools to inform long-term planning processes. It will also test the sensitivity of hydrology from Reclamation's operation model to the dynamically downscaling methodology. The project will begin with a pilot study on the San Juan Mountains before scaling to the entire Upper Colorado Basin.

 
 
 

David Rasmussen

email: david.m.rasmussen@nasa.gov

US Agriculture Research
NASA DEVELOP National Program
Langley Research Center
Hampton, VA 23681


Research

The purpose of this project is to create crop suitability maps for apple production in the United States. Maps would allow growers and processors to plan the placement of orchards and appropriate cultivars based on future climate projections. We will be examining and potentially using temperature data among the various forecast models.

 
 
 

DJ Rasmussen

email: dj.rasmussen@ssec.wisc.edu
website: http://www.sage.wisc.edu

I am a senior undergraduate atmospheric science major at the University of Wisconsin at Madison that is interested in applying meteorology in the energy industry. I am doing my senior thesis on wind energy forecasting using climate models.


Research

I am looking at utilizing the CGCM3 driven CRCM model results and using the outputted wind data for forecasting future power outputs at specific wind farms across the country. I am hoping to be able to understand how a CO2 forcing in the atmosphere affects long term output of power from wind farms. Will power production in 2040 be greater, less than, or equal to the current output at a specific wind farm?

I am also interested in using basic boundary layer equations and the one-seventh power law to explore using climate data and calculations.

 
 
 

Peter Rasmussen

email: peter.rasmussen@ad.umanitoba.ca

Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Manitoba. Research interests include floods and droughts, hydroclimatology, climate change, stochastic weather generation, and extreme precipitation.


Research

We are using NARCCAP data to examine the impact of climate change on extreme precipitation and on the hydrology of central Canada in general. We are particularly interested in quantifying the uncertainty arising from the use of regional climate models for downscaling. Current research focuses on how Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves may be impacted by future changes in climate. We hope that this will lead to recommendations as to how climate change knowledge should be incorporated in the design of urban drainage infrastructure. We are also using NARCCAP data to examine and compare the temporal and spatial scaling properties of precipitation from the different regional climate models.

 
 
 

Deeksha Rastogi

email: drastog2@illinois.edu

I am a graduate student. I focus on regional scale climate modeling to study land-atmosphere feedbacks.

Research
I focus on regional scale climate modeling to study land atmosphere interactions. I have coupled a vegetation model with WRF. I will be using NARCCAP data as the forcing for this model.

 
 
 

Sara Rauscher

email: rauscher@lanl.gov

Affiliation: Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos NM


Research

Our project will look at the likelihood of landscape-scale changes in vegetation in the Southwest due to the regional character of anthropogenic climate change. We will be using WRF for the RCM work and we will be extending CLM to include vegetation mortality. We will be looking at the NARCCAP WRF simulation to get an idea of how well WRF performs in climate mode. In addition, we may use the NARCCAP output along with the CMIP3 models to understand how well models represent the North American Monsoon System, particularly its intraseasonal variability.

 
 
 

Nalini Ravishanker

email: nalini.ravishanker@uconn.edu

Nalini Ravishanker is Professor and Undergraduate Program Director, Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs. She has an undergraduate degree in Statistics from Presidency College, Chennai, and received a Ph.D. in Statistics from the Stern School of Business, New York University. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, Editor for Theory and Methods of Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of Forecasting.

Her current methodological and applied research interests include: Time Series and Spatial data analysis; Times-to-events Analysis; Inference for Stable Processes; Signal Processing; and Simultaneous Inference Procedures. She also does considerable interdisciplinary research in several areas including Actuarial Science, Environmental Engineering, Finance, Marketing, Psychology, and Transportation Engineering. She has over 50 publications in leading journals in statistics and the applied disciplines, and has co-authored a text, A First Course in Linear Model Theory, Chapman & Hall/CRC (2001). She has been actively involved in business collaboration and consulting across several disciplines. Over the years, she has also supervised graduate and undergraduate research for several students in statistics and in the applied disciplines.


Research

The proposed research will deal with spatio-temporal clustering of a large number of time series, and then attempt to relate it to transportation safety. The approach is two-fold.

 
 
 

Michael Rawlins

email: rawlins02@yahoo.com
website: http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/

Manager of Climate System Research Center, University of Massachusetts. Research interests include impacts of climatic change on ecosystems.


Research

Goals of the proposed research include an assessment of how warming is affecting growing seasons across North America. Specifically we intend to look at the ideal timing of growing season for several types of plants and crops. Method will be an analysis of RCM air temperature fields for the length of growing season over different regions. Plan to use several combinations of RCM and AOGCM in the data archive.

 
 
 

Saman Razavi

email: saman.razavi@usask.ca

I am currently a postdoctoral fellow at the global institute for water security, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.


Research

My research is to investigate the impacts of climate change on hydrology and water resources in Alberta, Canada. I need NARCCAP data to force a hydro hydrologic model (yet to be developed). The streamflow data resulted from the hydrologic model will be routed through a water allocation model (fully developed and ready) to investigate the water system performance under NARCCAP data.

 
 
 

Betsy Reardon

email: betsy.reardon@mail.utexas.edu


Research

Main Research Goals:
Our main research goal is to forge a stronger relationship between the climate modeling disciplines and ecology/biology. Both of these disciplines work intensely on questions related to climate change, but almost in complete isolation from one another.

We hope to increase the scientific community's ability to make predictions regarding shifts in species geographic ranges due to climate change. Essentially, move beyond simplistic climate envelope methods and attempt to make predictions based on habitat and physiological needs for key life stages of a species.

Research Method:
We plan to use regional climate model outputs to construct a statistical model for the present distribution of specific habitats. Then validate the model using historic information, and finally make prediction about future distributions.

Research Plan:
Once we obtain necessary climate model outputs, we will simply follow the steps outlined in the methods. We also plan to use the habitat distribution results to identify key areas for individual species.

What data is needed:
We are interested in obtaining soil moisture, temperature, surface runoff and precipitation. We would like to have access to the finest spatial resolution possible for present and past time trials. Additionally, we would like to use the future predictions for different climate change scenarios.

Anticipated findings and or significance of work:
We intend to be able to make predictions about habitat availability for species that are at least transiently reliant on key habitats.

The significance of this work is in both the method and the potential results. This approach to species niche model has not yet been conducted (at least to this scale), and the results will provide valuable insight into conservation of strategic lands.

 
 
 

Shera Reems

email: reems.shera@epa.gov


Research

The main goal of our research is from the users perspective, utilizing regional climate modeling and dynamical downscaling to look at potential impacts of climate change on water quality.

We are interested in the extent to which States' ability to comply with water quality standards will be exacerbated by climate change. Specifically, we desire to compare the flow and water quality predictions at a watershed scale at several sites across the U.S. through various water models such as HSPF and P8 when initialized with both dynamically and statistically down-scaled climate projections. The NARCCAP data, especially the precipitation and temperature projections, would provide the dynamically down-scaled data. Such a sensitivity-analysis type comparison will not only give us insight into the quantitative differences between one approach vs. another but also allow us to better estimate resource requirements for conducting watershed-scale water quality / climate change studies nationwide. This research will support our long-term goal to engage State water quality partners in identifying and implementing options to mitigate climate change stressors on the nations' rivers and lakes.

 
 
 

Christopher Rehbein

email: christopher.rehbein@noaa.gov
website: http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov

I am a maintainer of NOAA/GFDL's Data Portal website, here so I can learn from and share insights on data presentation and access usability.


Research

While I don't intend to use NARCCAP data for scientific research, I am interested in advancing the state of the art in data presentation, visualization, and usability of data access.

 
 
 

Brian Reich

email: reich@stat.ncsu.edu
website: http://www4.stat.ncsu.edu/~reich/

I am an assistant professor of statistics at North Carolina State University. My research interests include modeling spatial and space/time data, Bayesian methods, and environmental applications.


Research

In this project we hope to study trends spatial and temporal trends in ambient surface ozone, with special focus on extreme ozone events. Ozone formation is highly dependent on meteorological factors. Our plan is to build a statistical model relating meteorological and emissions variables to daily ozone using the past 10 or so years of monitoring data, and then to use this statistical model to project (with measures of uncertainty) future ozone levels as a function of climate model output. These projections may have implications in planning ozone standards in the future.

 
 
 

Jonathan Resop

email: jonathan.resop@ars.usda.gov

Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Crop Systems and Global Change Lab at the USDA-ARS


Research

Research Goals: Explore potential production capacity of the U.S. Northeast Region under different climate change and land use scenarios.

Research Methods: Applying geospatial data to process-based crop models.

Data: A wide variety of data sources as input into the model. For climate change scenarios, I am interested in using GCMs (such as HadCM3). Would apply changes to temperature and precipitation to parameters in the weather generator CLIGEN.

Significance: Hopefully, the results will better educate regional planners on topics such as regional food security and sustainability.

 
 
 

David Retchless

email: dpr173@psu.edu

I am currently pursuing an MS in geography from The Pennsylvania State University. My interests include the perceptions and communication of climate change.


Research

The purpose of my research is to assess whether maps of spatial analogs for climate change are an effective means of overcoming difficulties in communicating climate change information to the public (i.e., discounting and other barriers to understanding and engagement). Data from NARCCAP will be statistically evaluated to identify a present-day spatial analog for the mid-to-late 21st century climate of a city in Pennsylvania. I will also use this data to generate isopleth maps of projected changes in temperature and precipitation in Pennsylvania. An online survey will present the maps and then assesses respondents' impact perceptions. The results will inform vital decisions about communicating climate change information to the public.

 
 
 

Christian Reuten

email: creuten@gmail.com


Research
My main research interest is in the impact of regional climate change on air quality, extreme weather events, and adaptation needs in agriculture and forestry. I hope to find more regionally relevant information on future temperatures and precipitation to improve our estimates of ozone exceedances in the Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia (Reuten et al. 2011, Atmos.-Ocean 50, 42-53). I am also working on the CO2-uptake potential of Canadian forests under future climate.

 
 
 

Alejandro Riano

email: ariano@asu.edu

I am a Masters student at Arizona State University. My interests are in water resources and climate change, from the engineering stand view point.

Research

The objective of my research is to explore the idea of implementing climate change model results in the storm water system engineering design, in particular the change in the mean precipitation given by the intensity-duration-frequency curves, when implementing the hourly precipitation data from NARCCAP. The study boundaries will be limited to the Phoenix Metropolitan Region. The study will use a combination of data series provided by measured data and the data provided by NARCCAP. Results from the computed statistics will be used to develop an index that addresses the uncertainties associated with the future climate and the present design standards.

 
 
 

Todd Ringler

email: ringler@lanl.gov
website: http://public.lanl.gov/ringler/ringler.html


Research

Main research goals: To couple regional climate model results to a disparate set of infrastructure models (water, biosphere, power, transmission ...) in order to assess the regional impacts of anthroprogenic climate change.

Research Methods: Using a suite of global climate models along with WRF, we intend to downscale coarse grained climate simulation data to spatial scales commensurate with our infrastructure models. Our initial downscaling efforts will be for the Western US. The NARCCAP data is required for comparison to our downscaling simulations. We also intend to quantify the impact of downscaling resolution (50 km vs 10 km) on our infrastructure impacts assessment.

Anticipated Findings: We intend to assess both the regional impacts and uncertainty of those impacts for the Western US given plausible changes in the large-scale circulation due to increasing levels of GHG concentration.

 
 
 

Geil Rios Vidal

email: griosv@vt.edu

Research work towards my thesis.

Research
My thesis is focused on Stormwater Management projected to climate change. In recent papers that I reviewed they quote your data and your high resolution climate scenarios created from multiple RCMs. We'll be using that data to generate precipitation data that will be the main input in my thesis model.

 
 
 

Derick L. Rivers

email: riversdl@mymail.vcu.edu

Derick L. Rivers is a second year doctoral student in Systems Modeling and Analysis at Virginia Commonwealth University. He received his Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Morris College in 1995, Masters of Education in 2004 from Cambridge College, and his Masters of Science in Mathematics with a concentration in Statistics from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2009.


Research

This data will help to provide a means of identifying the uncertainty of downscaled climate models. Also, the data will help to quantify the risk of certain impacts associated with climate change, such as the depletion of glacier run-off and ground-water flow.

The particular interest is in precipitation estimates, air temperature, solar radiation, and the volume of local glaciers and river basins from NARCCAP. The intended use will be to use the data for climate analysis at catchment scale and use the precipitation estimates, air temperature, solar radiation data as an input to PRMS model.

 
 
 

Jonas Roberts

email: jonaspmr@gmail.com

Jonas Roberts is a PhD student at Memorial University of Newfoundland. His research interests include climate change, hydrology and renewable energy.

Research

The NARCCAP data will be used to provide inputs and forcing for regional climate models, the output of which will be used to force hydrological models based on the Churchill River watershed in Labrador.

Our intial plans are to use the WRF (ARW) regional climate model along with the WATFLOOD hydrological model. Once we have some preliminary results using these we will likely be expanding the number of models we use.

Our goal is to get a better idea of the timing and amount of water in the Churchill River over the next century than is provided by the IPCC GCM results. We are expecting to see an overall increase in water flow and a shift of the spring floods to earlier than they occur today.

 
 
 

Jacola Roman

email: roman2@wisc.edu

Graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Research
Will be used for completion of master thesis

 
 
 

Matthew Rose

email: matt_rose@nps.gov

Environmental Specialist - National Park Service, Pacific West Region. Working on climate change mitigation and adaptation, primarily in the built environment.
Education:Duke University, Master of Environmental Management, 2007. University of Richmond, BA Environmental Sciences, 2003.
Phone: 206.220.4078


Research

I am currently working with the National Park Service on climate change mitigation and adaptation research and policy relating to National Parks and the NPS built environment. I would like to use the NARCCAP data for background discussion of climate change in parks, and for National Park Service General Management Plans, which guide long-term park policy and development in parks (approx. 15-20 year time frame). These plans are beginning to include climate change information, but downscaling data has thus far proved difficult. NARCCAP seems like it may be able to provide the kind of snapshot - regional information we are looking to include in the General Management Plans.

 
 
 

Andrew Ross

email: acr5155@psu.edu

I am an undergraduate studying meteorology at the Pennsylvania State University.


Research

The goal of my research is to study the potential impacts of climate change on wetlands within the Susquehanna River Basin.

I plan to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the available RCM/GCM combinations over a subdomain that covers most of the Susquehanna River Basin. Minimum and maximum air temperature, precipitation, zonal and meridional surface wind speeds, surface specific humidity, and surface downwelling shortwave radiation will be used in the evaluation. I will then select one or more of the most skilled RCM/GCM combinations, and I will likely apply bias correction to both the current and future scenarios. This data will then be used by other members of my research group to force a hydrological model (the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Modeling System) and predict future changes in the hydrology and ecology of wetlands within the river basin.

 
 
 

Jeremy Ross

email: jeremy.ross@prescientweather.com

Chief Scientist Prescient Weather Ltd Obtained B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1999, 2002, and 2005.

Research
Devils Lake, the largest natural lake in North Dakota, is the main feature in a large and relatively flat post-glacial drainage basin of nearly 4000 square miles containing parts or all of nine counties and two tribal lands. With drainage to the Red River only in exceptional cases, the lake is saline, its level has varied markedly, and water issues have been dominant in the basin since the area was settled in the late 1890s. More recently, the lake level has been generally increasing since the late 1930s, with a dramatic rise starting in the early 1990s. Local, state, and federal entities are involved in attempting to develop management plans for the basin that will protect its economic and biological values, that will optimize benefits for agriculture, recreation, economic development, wildlife, and fisheries, and that will honor the spiritual traditions of the native people.

Despite many studies on historical fluctuations in the Devils Lake water level, the relationships of the regional climate to broader, slowly-evolving climate anomalies and to global climate change are not well understood. The roles of both regional and global climate variability must be determined as a prelude to any attempt at improved watershed management now and in the near future. Quantitative analyses of climate variability will be key components of a Devils Lake decision support system aimed at effective management of the basin.

The objective of this work sponsored by the U.S. National Weather Service is to provide a detailed quantitative assessment of the role of climate variability and large-scale atmospheric flow patterns in contributing to variations in the water level of Devils Lake and then to attempt to identify and perhaps model the processes creating that variability.

Access to climate model data over the past century will be vital in diagnosing climate variability near Devils Lake. If climate models are able to simulate the observed precipitation regimes during the 20th century, then presumably the future scenarios they produce have validity and can be used for planning purposed. We intend to analyze this data and provide our finding to NOAA.

Preliminary analysis is available on our Devils Lake website: http://devilslake.prescientweather.com/.

 
 
 

Corina Rosu

email: rosu.corina@ouranos.ca


Research
In fact, I would need data from regional models (except CRCM) and driven to North America for the period 1961-2000, archived every 3 hours or 6 hours.

 
 
 

Erika Rowland

email: erowland@wcs.org


Research
Our group, based at the Wildlife Conservation Society-North America Program, intends to use the NARCCAP data as part of a climate change adaptation planning exercise we are undertaking for freshwater fisheries in the boreal region of northern Ontario. Specifically we will use the NARCCAP data as one source of information for developing climate change scenarios for the region. The scenarios, information about freshwater fisheries in the area, and analysis about cumulative impacts of extractive natural resource development will be coupled with expert opinion through a structured planning process in a workshop setting in late 2012. The goal of this effort is to share and synthesize scientific information on the vulnerabilities of fish to changing climate in the "Ring of Fire" area and identify potential adaptation options for reducing those vulnerabilities that could also support the land use planning underway in this, to date, predominantly undeveloped landscape.

 
 
 

Philippe Roy

email: roy@sca.uqam.ca

Philippe Roy is a PhD student at Université du Québec é Montréal (UQAM). His primary interest is in atmospheric sciences, and more specifically extremes events and climate variability.

Master thesis, under the supervision of Philippe Gachon and René Laprise: "Assessment of extremes and climate variability over different areas in north-eastern North America in summer, as simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model driven by reanalyses".

PhD project, under the supervision of Philippe Gachon and René Laprise: "Evaluation of the capacity of the Regional Climatic Models to reproduce the low and high-frequency variability and it's influences on the occurrence, the intensity and the duration of the regional extremes over North America"


Research

The present study, still at an early stage, will focus on the intercomparison of multiple regional climate models (CRCM4, GEM-LAM, RegCM3, REMO, WRF and ARPEGE) and their potential use to reproduce, as a first step, the characteristics of low (NAO, ENSO, PDO) and high frequency (induced by topography, soil conditions) climate variability patterns in the atmosphere over North America. Secondly, we'll assess the influence of these patterns of climate variability on the occurrence, intensity and duration of extremes events. Finally, we will assess the change in extremes under climate change condition through SRES scenarios (A1b, A2 and B1) and construct, under a probabilistic framework, probability density function of extremes change, based, partly, on the findings linking variability and extremes events.

The validation of climate variability will be done with Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF), Cluster Analysis or correlation maps of the simulated fields against observed variability indices. Assessment of the influence of the climate variability on extreme events will be done with correlation maps between a particular state (positive, negative and neutral) of climate variability and indices over North America. New techniques will be developed or implemented to further study the (nonlinear) link between climate variability and extremes.

The high-resolution results provided by this study will help decision-maker assessing future change in climate variability and extremes events by giving an ensemble of projection, based on SRES emission scenario as well as giving an estimate of the uncertainty associated with each projection.

 
 
 

Sujoy Roy

email: sujoy.roy@tetratech.com
website: http://rd.tetratech.com

Education Ph.D., Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa, 1995 M.S., Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa, 1992 B. Tech., Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India, 1990

Interests: Water quality and flow modeling, as related to needs for energy production, municipal supply, and agricultural production.

Professional Affiliation: Serve as principal engineer in the reserach and development group of Tetra Tech, a large, multi-discipline, environmental consulting firm. Located in Lafayette, California.

Address: 3746 Mount Diablo Blvd, Suite 300 Lafayette, CA 94549


Research
We would like to evaluate future precipitation projections to understand impacts to water supply as well as possible flooding risks, especially in the Southwestern United States. The water supply question needs an evaluation of changing average precipitation, with a focus on meeting future needs for municipal, energy, and agricultural sectors. Flooding risks require an assessment of short-duration precipitation projections (over 1 day to 1 week periods) to compare against historical precipitation patterns.

The goal of our work is to examine the NARCCAP projections in conjunction with localized models for water flow and water quality, typically focused on small watersheds of localized interest, such as the San Joaquin River watershed or the Owens River watershed, both of which have a portion in the Sierra Nevada mountains. In previous phases of this work (2008 to present) we have used statistically downscaled climate datasets available from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (http://gdo-dcp.ucllnl.org/downscaled_cmip3_projections/).

 
 
 

Venkat Roy

email: photon692@gmail.com

I am a PhD student at Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands. My research interests are mainly signal processing for environmental signals.


Research

I am working on developing signal processing algorithms for efficient processing of environmental signals. The main goal of the research is to represent and predict environmental signals using limited number of sensors. I will use NARCCAP data to evaluate the performance of the developed algorithms.

 
 
 

Rigel Rozanski

email: rrozanski@grnland.com

I have a bachelors in Environmental Engineering received from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. I am currently pursuing an Ontario Professional Engineering License.


Research

My current research pertains to the calculation of water run-off events produced by rain on snow events. Specifically, I have produced a model depicting the likelihood of various magnitudes of run-off events based on historical climate data using a non-finite technique. My new goal is to apply this model to future climate predictions. Data I will be using will likely be centered around Southern Ontario.

 
 
 

Alex Ruane

email: alex.ruane@qmail.com

Alex Ruane is an ORAU/NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow working with Cynthia Rosenzweig at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA GISS) in Manhattan. Previously, he received his B.S. in Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University and did his doctoral dissertation with John Roads in the Climate Sciences group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. Alex's dissertation work examined the atmospheric water cycle in global and regional reanalyses with a focus on high-frequency variations and comparisons to observation-based precipitation products. At NASA GISS he is downscaling multi-decadal climatologies over Central America from reanalyses and climate model scenarios, aiming to identify impacts of climate variability and change for stakeholders in the region. Similarly, the Southeastern USA and Metropolitan East Coast are other domains of interest for agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and water resource management.


Research

The Climate Impacts Group at NASA GISS is interested in NARCCAP output for several potential applications:

  1. Drive further downscaling with the WRF-ARW model to the metropolitan level
  2. Directly drive impact assessment models (of agriculture, energy, health, municipal applications, and/or water resource management)
  3. Examine the sensitivity of large-scale circulation patterns to climate scenarios
  4. Determine the statistics of extreme events in participating models
  5. Evaluate the ensemble and member statistics to determine whether NARCCAP-like projects are justified for climate impact assessments in other regions of the world.

Of primary initial interest is the downscaled 20th Century climate scenario, followed by the A1B scenarios in the mid 21st Century.

 
 
 

David Rupp

email: drupp@coas.oregonstate.edu
website: http://www.occri.net

Oregon Climate Change Research Institute
College of Earth, Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331


Research

Spatial patterns in climate change over the northwestern US.

 
 
 

Ashley Ryan

email: amryan01@syr.edu


Research

I'm using modeled temperature data to predict future ice thickness in New York for a master's research paper at SUNY ESF.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Allison Sacerdote

email: asacerdote@lpzoo.org


Research

The goal of the project I am currently working on is recovery of smooth green snake populations in northeastern Illinois. By combining field surveys for the snakes with habitat features (acres in grassland, presence of wetlands, distance to roads), and with regional climate variables, I aim to create predictive models of smooth green snake ecological niche. These suitability models will be used to evaluate the suitability of several candidate reintroduction sites. I hope to incorporate a radio telemetry aspect to this study (contingent on funding) that will hone our understanding of both microhabitat and landscape scale features that affect smooth green snake persistence. The results of these models will be used in recovery planning for the species in IL where it is a species in greatest need of conservation and several other states in its range where it is endangered or critically imperiled. The use of regional climate data will improve the accuracy of the models.

 
 
 

Mithun Saha

email: saha.m@husky.neu.edu

Doctoral student at Northeastern University.


Research

Working in several climate impact assessment study on Metropolitan Boston.

 
 
 

Tultul Saha

email: umsahat@cc.umanitoba.ca

TULTUL SAHA Graduate Research Assistant Department of Civil Engineering University of Manitoba 15 Gillson Street Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T5V6 Canada

Research
The scaling properties of extreme rainfall have been investigated to find out the scaling behavior of intensity-durations-frequency (IDF) curves which is used in hydrological processes to predict design extreme events. In this study basically three methods have been used to correct the Canadian Regional Climate Model data based on station observations. $\Delta$ -factor correction, ratio of mean of observations and mean of simulation data, has been employed to correct the CRCM data for each duration (1 hr, 2hr, 6hr, 12hr, 24hr).Simulation data has been also corrected based on reference duration (24 hr) and then scaling laws have been used to estimate the quantiles of all other durations. The last corrections has been done by quantile-quantile mapping based on observed extreme annual rainfall. >br> We are describing two key assumption here. Those are 1) as durations become shorter, the model data become increasingly inaccurate and unlikely to be useful even after bias correction and 2) the scaling properties of precipitation is intrinsic to the climate system and will apply in the future. We deal with those stations which follow simple scaling theory. We have used generalized extreme value model.
The outcome is the ratio of mean of observations and mean of control run for annual maximum rainfalls decreases with durations. On the other hand the ratio of mean of future observations and mean of future run is random. There is no systematic pattern. The scaling exponents of observations are different from simulation data and their relationship has been determined in this study. By comparing the three methods we get Delta-factor correction with scaling model gives more reliable result than QQ mapping because our expectation is discrepancies will be higher in shorter duration which we got when we use Delta values. But in QQ mapping the discrepancies are higher in longer duration.

 
 
 

Ritvik Sahajpal

email: ritvik@umd.edu
website: http://www.terpconnect.umd.edu/~ritvik

PhD Intern
Joint Global Change Research Institute
College Park, MD 20740


Research

Uncertainty analysis of impacts of future interannual climate variability on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay.

We plan to use the NARCCAP data in order to run the SWAT hydrology model for the Chesapeake bay for future climate scenarios, and measure the impact of interannual climate variability on various model outputs. We also intend to conduct a thorough sensitivity analysis on the model results. The results should shed some light on the future changes to bay water quality and the interplay between human activities and natural response in the bay system.

 
 
 

Eric P. Salathé Jr.

email: salathe@washington.edu
website: http://www.cses.washington.edu/cig/

Climate Impacts Group Joint Institute for the study of the Atmosphere and Oceans (JISAO) University of Washington, Seattle

BIOGRAPHY

  • September 1990 to September 1993: NASA Global Change Research Fellow, Yale University.
  • October 1993 to June 1995:National Research Council Associate, NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres.
  • July 1995 to July 1999: Research Associate, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington.
  • August 1999 to April 2007: Research Scientist, JISAO/CSES Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington.
  • July 2005 to present: Affiliate Assistant Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington.
  • May 2007 to present: Senior Research Scientist, Climate Impacts Group, JISAO, University of Washington.


Research

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

The Climate Impacts Group conducts research on the regional-scale impacts of climate change on natural and human systems in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), USA. Climate scenarios for this research are derived from global climate model simulations available from other institutions, such as for the IPCC Fourth Assessment. High-resolution data are produced using statistical downscaling and a high-resolution regional climate model. The primary applications of regional climate information are for hydrology, water resources, air quality, fish ecology, forest ecology, agriculture, and human health.

Results from the NARCCAP project would be useful at many levels for our work. Simulations would be useful for basic understanding of climate change and uncertainty for the PNW. Results could also be downscaled using statistical methods or a regional climate model for direct input to other models.

Regional climate modeling at University of Washington: http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~salathe/reg_climate_mod/

 
 
 

Esther Salazar

email: esalazar@samsi.info
website: http://www.dme.ufrj.br/esalazar

Postdoctoral Research at SAMSI working in the Space-time Analysis for Environmental Mapping, Epidemiology and Climate Change Program. My interest research are: dimension reduction, spatio-temporal modeling, computational statistics and Bayesian analysis.

Contact:
SAMSI - Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute
19 T.W. Alexander Drive, P.O. Box 14006
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709
Room 225, Tel: (919) 685-9341


Research

I am working on a project with researchers from various institutions. The group is led by Bruno Sanso from University of California Santa Cruz. Our areas of expertise are spatio-temporal modeling, dimension reduction and model comparison.

We are interested in comparing different regional climate models for analysing events like heat waves. Our objectives are: (1) to model the observed and simulated data from Regional Climate Models (RCM) simultaneously for inference on the spatial and temporal patterns of heat waves in U.S. (2) Predicting heat waves occurance in a given period of time in the future by the simulated outputs from RCM. For that, we plan to model high temperatures in a small region, more specifically in the Southwest U.S.

 
 
 

Guido Salvucci

email: gdsalvuc@bu.edu

Professor of Earth and Environment at Boston University
Research Interests: Hydrology, Hydroclimatology, Evaporation


Research

My main research goal is to find out if a specific relation between relative humidity and evaporation that I found at ameriflux field sites also occurs between relative humidity and evaporation as simulated by climate models. The observed relation allows evaporation to be estimated from weather data without knowledge of surface limiting factors such as soil moisture, leaf area, stomatal conductance. The relation is described in "Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data, Salvucci and Gentine, PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1215844110". While the paper provided strong evidence for the relation at a wide variety of sites (e.g. arid to humid), it did not provide an explanation for why the relation exists (e.g., what feedback processes between the land and atmosphere cause the observed relation). It will be useful to know if the relation exists in simulated conditions as this will help explain its causes.

To achieve this I will apply the methods described in the cited paper, but using the archived output of the nested models instead of measured weather data. The required variables appear to exist in the NARCCAP archive, specifically: the diurnal cycle (3 hourly suffices) of 2 meter air temperature and humidity, wind speed somewhere in the surface layer (10 meters suffices), incoming short and long wave radiation , and outgoing shortwave radiation, and, for validation, requires latent heat flux. I will test the ideas at a few hundred locations chosen to represent a variety of climatic and landscape conditions, in each for 5 year runs. At this stage, I will likely only use the "current" conditions, but at a later stage I will check to see if the results differ under the climate change scenario. Significance of the work includes the potential for better understanding of the relation between evaporation and weather, and possibly better insight into how the hydrologic cycle may change in a changing climate.

 
 
 

Nadine Salzmann

email: salzmann@ucar.edu

Nadine Salzmann is currently a postdoctoral fellow at ISSE/NCAR in Boulder, CO, USA, where her work focuses on the analysis of NARCCAP runs concerning the dynamics of the seasonal snow regime of the Upper Colorado River Basin. She received her PhD degree at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, with the thesis "The use of results from Regional Climate Models for local-scale permafrost modeling in complex mountain topography – possibilities, limitations and challenges for the future". The RCM data that she was using for her PhD were mainly provided through the PRUDENCE project. In her MSc thesis she was using remote sensing techniques and GIS-modeling to assess the hazard potential of ice avalanches in the Swiss Alps. Beside her academic studies, she gained practical experience in the issues of climate change impact and natural hazards through several temporary employments e.g. with swissre (a reinsurance company in Switzerland), and internships e.g. at defense civil in Arequipa, Peru.


Research

One of the main goals of Regional Climate Models (RCMs) is to provide high resolution climate (scenario) data for further use by the impact community. In this manner, NARCCAP will become a very valuable source of RCM data for North America. RCMs have been proven to be especially valuable over regions with heterogeneous surface such as mountain ranges. My main interest in the NARCCAP data is, thus, to analyze and evaluate the performance of the NCEP-driven NARCCAP runs in simulating cryospheric (mainly the dynamics of the snow regime) processes in high-mountain regions. Thereby, I am focusing on the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). The Colorado River is the major water resource for millions of people living in the surrounding areas. The high elevation seasonal snow pack contributes about 70% of the annual runoff. On average, about 90% of the annual streamflow is generated in the UCRB. The perfomance analyses of the NCEP-driven runs are in progress and currently based on preliminary NARCCAP results, that is on data that have not yet been archived. The evaluation includes comparison with station data sets such as SNOTEL and reanalysis data such as NARR. In a second step, I will try to assess how the seasonal snow regime may changes in future (based on NARCCAP time-slice experiments) and what the impacts are for the Colorado River's hydrology runoff and finally the consequences for the people leaving in the area.

 
 
 

S. Zahra Samadi

email: zahra.samadi@gmail.com

I need to compare NARCCAP downscaling data with USGS outputs.

Research
Currently we are using USGS downscale climate data (precipitation, max & min temperature and evapotranspiration) in our research project which downscaled by Prof. Katherine Hayhoe. We will be studying USGS outputs with NARCCAP outputs using proper uncertainty methods. Our focus are is the Carolinas, particularly the application of NARCCAP & USGS data for estimate river runoff in South Carolina.

 
 
 

Costa Samaras

email: csamaras@rand.org
website: http://www.rand.org/about/people/s/samaras_constantine.html

Constantine Samaras is an engineer at the RAND Corporation and Affiliated Faculty at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He is also an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). His research area is the assessment of policy, technology, and cost-benefit decisionmaking under uncertainty and risk, primarily regarding energy and climate issues. Samaras researches how policy actions and research and development (R&D) investments affect energy use and security, infrastructure requirements, economic and innovation outcomes, and environmental impacts. He was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Climate Decision Making Center at CMU, and has published numerous studies exploring the economic, security, and life-cycle environmental attributes of plug-in vehicles, renewable electricity, and low-carbon fuels. He also has experience analyzing economy-wide and sector-specific climate and energy policies with a focus on the electricity and transportation sectors. Prior to beginning his research at CMU, Samaras was employed for five years as an engineering and sustainability consultant working on several multibillion-dollar infrastructure projects in New York.

Samaras received his Ph.D. in engineering and public policy and civil and environmental engineering from CMU. He is also a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) accredited professional.


Research
I've been working more in adaptation research and decisionmaking under deep uncertainty, and the affects of climate change on infrastructure and infrastructure planning. The expected outputs are peer-reviewed journal papers or RAND reports.
I greatly enjoyed Linda Mearns' presentation at RAND.

 
 
 

Kevin Sampson

email: ksampson@ucar.edu
website: http://www.gisclimatechange.org/

Kevin Sampson is an Associate Scientist within the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) GIS Program at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Primary focus is on providing climate-change scenarios and climate model projections to the general public in standard GIS formats through a web-based portal.


Research

The main goal of this effort is more to facilitate research and disseminate derived information from climate model outputs to the general public. The NCAR GIS Program is an interdisciplinary effort to foster collaborative science, spatial data interoperability, and knowledge sharing with GIS. The main goal of the GIS Initiative is to promote and support the use of GIS as both an analysis, and an infrastructure tool in atmospheric research and to address broader issues of spatial data management, interoperability, and geoinformatics within the geosciences. Working in collaboration with other NCAR strategic initiatives, divisions, and UCAR programs (such as Unidata, CDP, IMAGe, CGD, ISSE and RAL), we support variety of science projects at NCAR, make atmospheric data sets compatible with GIS tools, create bridges between atmospheric, geo- and social sciences, enable users to access, integrate and manage spatial information, and communicate science outcomes to the community of GIS users and the stakeholders.

Within the aforementioned context, the GIS Program supports and promotes a web-based portal to serve a wide community of GIS users interested in global climate change. In this project, the GIS Initiative collaborates with the Community Data Portal team to allow for web-based distribution of global datasets of climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). The free datasets of climate change projections can be viewed on-line and/or downloaded in a common GIS (shapefile) or text file format. Many 2D variables from modeled projected climate are available for the atmosphere and land surface. We are attempting to collaborate with the NARCCAP team at NCAR to possibly provide high-resolution datasets derived from sets of regional climate models, as opposed to the current framework of providing data from only one global climate model (CCSM 3.0). We hope to use Table 6 data aggregated to monthly or longer time-scales, to complement and aid comparison to currently distributed datasets from our portal. The goal is to reach a set of users outside the atmospheric sciences, and connect GIS practitioners with scientifically sound datasets from which to make decisions.

 
 
 

Jos Samuel

email: sjos@mcmaster.ca

I am a hydrologist and currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.


Research

Our research project focuses on the estimations of continuous flows in ungauged basins under various climate change scenarios. The project is conducted in the Province of Ontario, Canada having the area of approximately 1 million km2 and involves 135 basins covered by various soil, vegetation and topography. It was started by estimating rainfall-runoff model parameters in gauged basins, transferring model parameters from gauged to ungauged basins through applying various regionalization approaches (single and couple models) and estimating flow uncertainties in ungauged basins. The uncertainty of flows estimated above was mainly due to the uncertainty of rainfall-runoff model parameters. Future flow uncertainty might also come from changing climate. NARCCAP data will be used in this part. We will investigate the uncertainty of flows caused by meteorological outputs of each climate models and their combinations with the rainfall runoff model uncertainties.

 
 
 

Anna Samuels

email: awsamuel@iupui.edu

Anna Samuels Graduate Student Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) Department of Earth Sciences 723 West Michigan Street, SL118 Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 317.274.7484

Research
My research is focused on the spatial optimization of best management practices (BMPs) in Eagle Creek Watershed, IN, USA under climate change scenarios. I am utilizing ArcAPEX in my research to determine the best locations and best types of BMPs for water quality and stoarge under extreme weather events. I will be using daily weather ouptut in my ArcAPEX model and running scenarios for future projections. The goal of my research is to determine the long-term sustainability of BMPs under changing climate conditions.

 
 
 

Mathew Sapiano

email: msapiano@essic.umd.edu
website: http://essic.umd.edu/~msapiano/


Research

  • Estimation of precipitation from combinations of satellites, models and gauges
  • Verification and validation of weather and climate data
  • The application of statistical methods to geophysical problems
  • Climate analysis
  • Climate and infectious disease

We are interested in precipitation estimates from NARCCAP and we initially intend to evaluate these against other sources from satellites, models and reconstructions over the entire period for which they are available.

 
 
 

Adam Saunders

email: adamtsaunders@gmail.com

Geomatics student at The University of Waterloo, assisting a professor with climate model research.

Research
To perform statistical analyses on the data output from regional climate model simulations performed under the NARCCAP model intercomparison project. The scientific focus will be on the impact of climate change on extreme temperature and precipitation events over North America during the 21st Century.

 
 
 

Hester Scheepers

email: scheeper@ualberta.ca


Research

In this study, we will set up the RCM called WRF (Weather Research Forecasting) using a two-way nesting over a two-domain configuration. The outer domain (D1) has a 45 km resolution while the inner domain (D2) has a 15 km resolution. Using the two-domain setup, the precipitation of ERA-Interim reanalysis data (1.5° x 1.5°) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) will be downscaled by WRF over the Mackenzie River Basin of Canada and the precipitation simulated by WRF will be validated against observed precipitation data of selected gauging stations located across the Mackenzie and compared with the precipitation of Mackenzie assessed from multi-model NARCCAP ensemble simulations.

This project is funded through the Northern Transportation Adaptation Initiative of Transport Canada.

 
 
 

Phil Schermerhorn

email: phillip.schermerhorn@austintexas.gov


Research
I work in the reporting group at the City of Austin and have been tasked with getting the NARCCAP climate change modeling data for Central Texas.

 
 
 

Adam Schlosser

email: casch@mit.edu
website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/


Research
We will be using NARCCAP data to assess simulated regional changes in extreme precipitation (as given by the RCMs) with respect to a climate analogue technique developed (using GCMs). This work is supported by a NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) grant. We will also use the NARCCAP data to assess complementary regional climate impact and feedback studies supported by DOE and UNDP projects. This effort is also hoped to further foster the MIT/NCAR collaboration to develop integrated assessment models in the context of uncertainty in regional climate change (Linda Mearns has been a key contact with us in this regard).

 
 
 

Justin Schoof

email: jschoof@siu.edu

I am an Associate Professor of Geography and Environmental Resources at Southern Illinois University.

Research
My research focuses primarily on GCM downscaling. I'm interested in comparing empirical and dynamical downscaling approaches for a number of variables including precipitation and wind and using this archive to address the sources of the differences.

 
 
 

Stephanie Schreiner

email: stepos@gmail.com

I am currently volunteering at the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority, in London Ontario, and am completing a project on "Assessing the Hydrologic Effects of Climate Change in the Upper Thames River Watershed".


Research

My research focuses on "Assessing the Hydrologic Effects of Climate Change in the Upper Thames River Watershed." Using a hydrological watershed model (HEC-HMS), I aim to assess the impacts of climate change on the local hydrological system, i.e. river discharge, reservoir capacity, etc.. Precipitation and temperature time-series data for future climate change scenarios will be input into the model to compare the "future scenario" outflow to the historical/actual river discharge data; hence determining any changes to the design storms for different return periods. This research will aid in creating policies and the planning of development in the watershed.

 
 
 

Tom Schubbe

email: tschubbe@sebesta.com


Research

I conduct technical, economic and environmental evaluations of utility systems owned and operated by clients. The evaluation quantifies a baseline of production, demand and capacity requirements, fuel and energy consumption for producing utiltiy service and associated emissions over a planning horizon, typically 20 to 40 years. The baseline accounts for variations of service requirements anticipated over the planning horizon, such as growth of the cusotmer base, energy conservation initiatives of the customer base, advent of new technologies or use of alternate configurations to fulfill service obligations, etc. I plan to use the NARCCAP data to develop an additional module that would consider potential effect of climate scenarios on future capacity requirements and the production/delivery of utiltiy services.

 
 
 

Scott Schuetter

email: sschuetter@ecw.org
website: http://www.ecw.org

Scott analyzes efficient building designs and researches various energy efficiency technologies in his role at the Energy Center. He has extensive experience with both energy and daylight modeling and serves as program manager for the Daylighting Collaborative. Scott is a large-scale batch energy modeling specialist who focuses much attention on modeling campuses, communities and regions. He also studies climate change impacts on building energy consumption and demand. Scott holds a bachelor's degree in physics from Indiana University and a master's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. He is an active member of ASHRAE.

Research
Energy use in buildings in 2010 accounted for 41% of the entire U.S. energy consumption at a total cost of $418.4 billion. Therefore, even small increases in the country's energy consumption have a large impact. Our research involves modeling the impact of climate change on the built environment. We will develop building energy models that predict a building's electrical and natural gas usage, as well as its peak electric demand, peak cooling demand, and peak heating demand. Our models use TMY2 or TMY3 climate files to show a building's energy profile under a current climate scenario. The NARCCAP data will be used with the previously developed building models to predict a building's energy profile under future climate scenarios.
The future energy profiles will then be analyzed to develop mitigation strategies for minimizing the effect of climate change on the built environment. These mitigation strategies will likely include differing levels of insulation, improved glazing properties, efficient lighting and HVAC systems, as well as advanced controls strategies.

 
 
 

Zachary Schuster

email: zschuster@wisc.edu


Research

We will use the climate scenarios to investigate the impact of climate change in the upper Midwestern U.S. on the effectiveness of urban infrastructure designed to manage or simply withstand runoff from large storm events. This includes conveyance systems (bridges and culverts), stormwater storage facilities, and wastewater treatment facilities. In cases where there is sensitivity to climate changes that are likely occur in the next few decades, we will explore changes in design practices.

 
 
 

Jamie Scott

email: james.d.scott@noaa.gov
website: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/people/james.d.scott/


Research

I plan to investigate heavy precipitation events over the Rocky Mountains, examining the frequency, intensity and synoptic pre-conditions of such events. I will compare the NARCCAP 20th century runs to the 21st century runs, 20th century reanalyses and observations.

 
 
 

Frank Seglenieks

email: frank.seglenieks@ec.gc.ca

I am a hydrological modeller that is currently working for Environement Canada as a post-doc. Last year I graduated with my PhD from the University of Waterloo where I am currently an adjunct professor.

NSERC Visiting Fellowship | Boursier CRSNG
Climate Processes Section | Section des processus climatiques
Climate Research Division | Division de la recherche climatique
Science and Technology Branch | Direction g?rale des sciences et de la technologie
Environment Canada | Environnement Canada
4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto ON M3H 5T4 | 4905, rue Dufferin, Toronto ON M3H 5T4
Telephone 416-739-4752 (Downsview) Telephone 905-336-6017 (Burlington) Government of Canada | Gouvernement du Canada


Research

As part of my post-doc I am working on the International Upper Great Lakes Study, a project of the international joint commission with researchers from both the US and Canada.

My part of the study is to examine the effects of future climates on the water levels in the Laurentian Great Lakes. As such we are examining the output from various RCMs, specifically the runoff, overlake precipitation, and overlake evaporation. These data are combined into the Net Basin Supply which can then be used to calculate the lake levels.

By comparing the simulated lake levels for both the current climate and future climate slices we can determine the effect of climate change on the lakes. We have already examined RCM data from the Ouranos group and would be interested in using the output from other RCMs.

The results of this study will be used in developing a new adaptive management plan for the Great Lakes. This plan will take into account the needs of various stakeholders in the Great Lakes including fisheries, navigation, power production, drinking water supplies, and recreational uses.

 
 
 

Scott Sellars

email: scott.sellars@uci.edu

I am a first year graduate student with the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing at the University of California, Irvine.

Background: 2010 - Present: University of California, Irvine, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Graduate Student Researcher, Hydrology and Water Resources Ph.D Program

2008 - 2009: Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New York, NY Master of Arts, Climate and Society; Emphasis: Climate Variability, August 2009

2000 - 2005: University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT Bachelor of Science, Meteorology; Option: Atmospheric Science, May 2005 Research Interests: Climate Variability and Change, Climate Dynamics, Hydrology, Water Resource Management, Stochastic Weather Generation.


Research

Main Research Goals: To perform an analysis of spatial precipitation patterns within regional climate models and compare these spatial patterns to observational data. I hope to develop a better understanding of precipitation patterns in regional climate models for use in water resource management and reservoir operation rules testing.

Research Plan: Look at precipitation outputs from a wide range of models and scenarios. I will be using spatial pattern techniques to develop methodologies for comparison of precipitation patterns with observational data (gauge, radar and satellite data).

 
 
 

Fredrick Semazzi

email: fred_semazzi@ncsu.edu
website: http://climate-psm.meas.ncsu.edu

Professor
North Carolina State University
Department of Marine, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 26975-8208, USA


Research

Climate indices found using EOF analysis on NARR wind speed, wind direction and precipitation data will be compared known climate indices in the region. The wind at the coast of the southeastern US is influenced by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific-North American teleconnection pattern (PNA), and the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation (AMO) so these will be among the indices compared to the modes. The modes from the NARR dataset will then be compared to EOF modes for NARCCAP (North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program) output from WRFG run using CGCM3 boundary conditions (available for 1971-2000) in order to build confidence in data from this model. Other model output may be used to analyze confidence in climate model information in future studies.

Hurricane research: Directing multi-institutional funded research based on an integrated approach that considers all phases of hurricane development from the embryonic phase on the slopes of Ethiopia in Africa to landfall in the US. The objectives are to (i) understand the physical processes involved in determining the development and evolution of the Atlantic Hurricanes, and (ii) improve the skill for the seasonal prediction of hurricanes.

Climate change research: This research involves detection, attribution and projection of the Eastern Africa climate. We adopt a regional ensemble coupled climate model embedded into the domain of a global model grid. This system is used to make projections of the regional climate, lake circulation, and lake level over Eastern Africa.

 
 
 

Shimelis Setegn

email: ssetegn@fiu.edu

Postdoctoral Research Scientist
Department of Earth and Environment
Florida International University (FIU)
11200 SW 8th Street, ECS 168
Miami, FL 33199

I have a Ph.D. degree in Land and Water Resources Engineering. Currently, I am a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the Department of Earth and Environment, Florida International University (FIU), Miami, Florida, USA. At FIU I am responsible in leading the hydrological modeling component of the Caribbean Coastal Scenarios (CCS) project where I use hydrological models to simulate seasonal and inter-annual fluxes of fresh water and sediments to coastal zones as a function of climate and catchment characteristics.

My core research interests include distributed watershed hydrologic modeling and uncertainty analysis; surface and groundwater interactions modeling; Land-atmosphere interaction; geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing applications in water resources and land cover change detection; analysis of statistical and dynamical downscaling methods for prediction of climate change impacts; coupling between upland watershed models and downstream hydrodynamic models for better prediction of lake/reservoir hydrodynamic and water quality and so on.


Research
I am planning to study the impact of climate change on the hydrology of Florida Everglades. Since NARCCAP is a regional model output it will be a better option for alanyzing the climate change projection and its impact on water resources. I will need only precipitaion and temperature dataset.

 
 
 

Anji Seth

email: anji.seth@uconn.edu

Dr. Anji Seth is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Connecticut. Her research seeks to understand how and why climate varies, and how changes in climate are likely to evolve in the next century in particular regions. This work employs global and regional 3-D physically based numerical climate models. Dr. Seth's research explores the relative roles of local and remote (large scale) forcing on regional climates with current projects considering ancient climates of Antarctica and the future of climate in the Andean Highlands and the Northeast US.Dr. Seth earned a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and a PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Michigan. She has held positions as Graduate Fellow and Visiting Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO, and as Staff Scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University. Dr. Seth also holds adjunct faculty positions at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and Columbia University in New York City.


Research

Global coupled models now show coherent patterns of temperature and precipitation response to anthropogenic radiative forcing, but regional detail is lacking in low resolution climate models, and the margins between regions likely to gain and lose precipitation are especially uncertain during the warm season in North America. To advance the understanding of regional climate response to anthropogenic forcing this research will examine changes in 21st century climate across multiple scales and from the perspective of the Northeast United States. Several scale dependent mechanisms involved in warm season and cold season climate changes in the Northeast will be investigated. For example, mechanisms involved in potential summertime drying are hypothesized to have large scale components, enhanced poleward moisture transport and changes in the Atlantic sub-tropical anticyclone; a mesoscale dynamical component and changes in the low level moisture transport; and fine scale components related to variations in response between coastal and interior sub-regions. An approach is proposed which exploits medium resolution (50 km) global model time slices performed for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) in addition to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report Four (IPCC AR4) global coupled model (20th century and SRES A2) archives. The global integrations will be analysed for large scale and continental scale changes in circulation and moisture transport to the Northeast. The medium resolution integrations will provide boundary forcing for very high resolution (15 km) regional climate model experiments for the Northeast. The experiments combined with observational datasets for the recent period, constitute a multi-scale approach toward understanding the changing climate of the Northeast.

 
 
 

Gavin Shaddick

email: g.shaddick@bath.ac.uk

Senior lecturer in statistics at the University of Bath


Research

Research interests: effects of environmental factors on health. In particular the effects of pollution and changes in temperature on mortality. Primary interest is in using statistical models to assess potential impacts on health.

 
 
 

Shaina Stacy

email: sls157@pitt.edu

Master of Public Health Candidate, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health

Research
My overall research goals are to predict the potential impacts of climate change on fungal toxin (mycotoxin) concentrations in crops and also the resulting economic impacts. I am using equations with temperature and precipitation variables to predict mycotoxin concentrations in crops. Specifically, I will be using the data from NARCCAP to predict deoxynivalenol (DON)levels in wheat crops in certain regions of the United States and Canada. This work will allow us to anticipate potential financial impacts to farmers as a result of crop loss because of contaminated crops.

 
 
 

ZongBo Shang

email: zshang@ucar.edu

Intern at NCAR
Doctoral student at University of Wyoming


Research

Recently, false discovery rates (FDR) has been emphasized in bioinformatics, e.g., genes expression and microarray, functional magnetic resonance imaging, etc. Here we want to implement a similar approach to controll the false discovery rates for detecting differences from regional climate models. The purpose of this study is to look at the regional climate model driven with reanalysis data vs. predicted seasonal climate, and identify the overall trend in climate change and false discovery rates of the differences.

 
 
 

Suresh Sharma

email: sharm126@purdue.edu

I am a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Purdue University,Indiana. I received my PhD in Civil Engineering from Auburn university, USA.

Research
I am trying to see the impact of global climate change in Bioenergy Crops dominated agricultural watershed of the midwest.

 
 
 

Darrin Sharp

email: dsharp@coas.oregonstate.edu
website: http://occri.net

Darrin Sharp a B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois (Urbana), and an M.S. in Ecology from Colorado State University. He has experience working in both high-tech and the environmental sciences. His interests include the development of information systems used for ecological and environmental research. Darrin is currently a Faculty Research Assistant at the Oregon Climate Change Research Inst. at Oregon State University.


Research

The Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI), based at Oregon State University (OSU), is a network of researchers at OSU, the University of Oregon, Portland State University, and Southern Oregon University. In 2007, the Oregon state legislature charged OCCRI with: fostering climate change research among faculty of the Oregon University System (OUS); serving as a clearinghouse for climate information; and providing climate change information to the public in an easily understandable form.

Initially, OCCRI intends to use NARCCAP data to support two projects: (i) a preliminary assessment of the risks and vulnerabilities climate change poses to the surface transportation infrastructure system in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska regions; (ii) hydrodynamic and ecological modeling of Pacific Northwest estuaries.

OCCRIs primary role in the research will be to evaluate NARCAAP regional projections and communicate them to other parties involved in the research projects.

In the future, OCCRI envisions using NARCCAP data to further evaluate the potential impacts of climate change on the state of Oregon and the greater Pacific Northwest.

 
 
 

Willis Shem

email: shemwo@ornl.gov

I received my PhD. (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences) from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia-Tech) in August 2006. I am currently a post-doctoral research associate at the Climate Change Science Institute, within the Environmental Science Divison of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Research
Research Interests: My current research is focused on performing further downscaling experiments, via higher resolution WRF simulations based on various climate change scenarios with focus on the following items. 1. The impact of landuse changes (e.g urbanization) on the precipitation component of the hydrological cycle 2. Biosphere-Atmosphere interactions in general 3. Hydrological Models (for watershed management and applications)

 
 
 

Daehyok Shin

email: sdhyok@email.unc.edu
website: http://www.unc.edu/sdhyok/

I am working with Dr. Lawrence E. Band at the lab of Terrestrial Hydrologic Ecosystem Modellers.

Ph.D Student
Geography Department
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


Research

I am studying physically-reliable hydrologic and biogeochemical models, and its application for ecological processes. I am interested in NARCCAP for evaluation of water resource vulnerability in North Carolina.

 
 
 

DW Shin

email: shin@coaps.fsu.edu

I'm an assistant research scientist at FSU/COAPS. I'm interest in assessing the value of dynamical downscalings for (crop) application models.

Research
Using NARCCAP data, I would like to assess the potential impacts of climate change/variability on production of three economically important crops (maize, peanut, and cotton) in the SE USA. In addition, I am going to develop appropriate weighted ensemble strategies for optimized future regional crop yield projections.

 
 
 

Yongchul Shin

email: ycshin@tamu.edu

Doctoral student in Biological & Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M Univeristy

Research

The research goal is "near-surface soil moisture assimilation for quantifying effective soil hydraulic properties". For estimating soil moisture, the surface energy balance is very important. As input data sets, I will use the weather data.

 
 
 

Mxolisi Shongwe

email: mxolisi.shongwe@weathersa.co.za

I work on climate change research at the South African Weather Service. My research interest is on climate change science, climate impacts and uncertainty issues.

Research
I am working on a research project as part of the IMAGe Theme-of-the-Year Workshop. This project aims at understanding the impacts of climate change on water resources at selected regions within the US.

 
 
 

Rajesh Shrestha

email: rshresth@uvic.ca
website: http://pacificclimate.org/

Research Areas: Hydrologic Modelling, climate change impacts on hydrologic processes.


Research

Our research at PCIC focuses on assessing climate change impacts on hydrologic regimes in the selected watersheds of British Columbia, Canada. For the projection of future hydro-meteorological regimes, RCM outputs will be extracted for selected watersheds in British Columbia. The potential changes in future hydro-meteorological signals will be analyzed based on the ensemble outputs from multiple RCMs. The RCM outputs will also be compared with an ensemble of multiple GCM driven hydrologic model outputs.

 
 
 

Robert Shriver

email: rks24@duke.edu
website: http://rkshriver.weebly.com/

I am PhD student at Duke University


Research

I am interested in the effects changing rainfall amount, intensity, and timing will have on desert plants in the southwestern US. I plan to incorporate models of plant growth, reproduction, and survival, fit to field data, with regional projections of rainfall changes to look at how plants will respond. I hope to compare the relative effects of changes in rainfall amount and intensity on plants.

 
 
 

Ewelina Sienkiewicz

email: E.A.Sienkiewicz@lse.ac.uk

I'm PhD student in Department of Statistics at London School of Economics.

Research
I am working in the Centre for the Analysis of Time Series, and my provisional thesis title is "defining the limits of climate modelling: when to downscale". I need an access to NARCCAP data to study existing climate models, compare outputs from regional and global ones, assess input variables, identify which variable prevents accurate results and determinate when small and large models deviate too much. The project will involve working between CATS and NCAR. Main area of research interest concerns time series, non-linear time series, statistical modelling of uncertainty and error in forecasting, data visualisation, environmental economics.

 
 
 

Jana Sillmann

email: jana.sillmann@ec.gc.ca
website: http://climate.uvic.ca/people/jsillmann/

I am working as research associate in the UVic Climate Modelling group at the University of Victoria. My research focuses on the analysis of climate extremes in the context of natural climate variability and climate change.


Research

I am interested in assessing the ability of climate models (regional and global) to represent the relationship between modes of climate variability (e.g., ENSO, PDO, atmospheric blocking) and climate extremes as revealed in observations and in analyzing possible changes in these relationships considering future climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Amanjot Singh

email: asingh@creditvalleyca.ca

I am working as a Water Quality Engineer for a Conservation Authority in Ontario, Canada and one of my responsibilities is addressing watershed water quality issues under light of changing climate.


Research

  1. To use data for climate analysis at watershed scale
  2. To use climate data as an input to hydrologic models

 
 
 

Deepti Singh

email: singhd@stanford.edu

Graduate Student

Research
I intend to use these simulations for comparing precipitation projections in the 21st century by different GCMS and RCMS

 
 
 

Paramita Sinha

email: psinha@rti.org


Research
Explore the ability to project migration patterns of households associated with climate projections from global circulation models and regional climate models using an existing model of location choice. Data on temperature and precipitation projections required.

 
 
 

Vidyashankar Sivakumar

email: shankar861@gmail.com

I am a first year student at the University of Minnesota in the Masters program in computer science.


Research

I am a student working on statistical downscaling methods for precipitation.

 
 
 

Richard Skaggs

email: skaggs@umn.edu

Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota


Research

Minnesota's climate has become increasingly warmer, wetter, and variable, resulting in unquantified economic and ecological impacts. More recent changes in precipitation patterns combined with urban expansion and wetland losses have resulted in an increase in the frequency and intensity of flooding in parts of Minnesota with extensive and costly damage to the State's infrastructure and ecosytems. We are examining historic climate records and developing a database of key climatic measures and their variability in a current LCCMR project "Impacts on Minnesota's aquatic resources from climate change". To assess the consequences of past climate trends on aquatic resources we are analyzing hydrologic, water quality, and fish community responses. We propose to expand that study to develop prediction for future climate specific to Minnesota, and then quantify the potential economic impact of climate-induced changes in precipitation and hydrology on the water resource infrastructure, including storm sewers, bridges, water treatment facilities, and shoreline development. The current biological analyses will be expanded beyond fish to invertebrates (e.g., mosquitos) and projections of future biotic responses from hydrologic and water quality models will be developed. Lastly, to assist the state's natural resource managers and regulators, we will identify potential hydrologic and aquatic indicators and propose monitoring methods that can be implemented in Minnesota. An Advisory Committee will help define the initial questions to be answered and review products.

 
 
 

Daina Smar

email: daina.smar@gmail.com

I am a masters student at the University of Central Florida working in the Coastal Hydroscience Analysis, Modeling & Predictive Simulations Laboratory under Dr. Scott Hagen. My research interests include storm surge modeling, sea level rise, and climate change.

Research
The research using the NARCCAP data invloves a climate change project which will incorporate NARCCAP data into local climate models. These models will be used to first validate and calibrate local models, and then to predict future precipitation levels and storm intensities. This research is funded by a sea level rise project.

 
 
 

Kaitlyn Smith

email: kaitlyn.smith@ttu.edu

I am a graduate student pursuing my Master's degree at Texas Tech University.

Research
I am working on quantifying potential shifts in the geographic range of mosquito populations in the eastern U.S. under future climate change for my Master's thesis. As part of this I want to compare how different models and different datasets affect the projected geographic range of the populations. I am currently using MaxEnt to model these projected ranges. I believe that this work will be important in projecting which areas mosquito populations will move to and through, which is important to the spread of diseases such as dengue fever. From this project, I also expect to be able to better identify which factors have impacted the historic movement of mosquito populations the most by comparing projected ranges created with reanalysis data with known current locations.

 
 
 

Kara Smith

email: kasmith5@ncsu.edu

I am a Ph.D. student in the Climate Modeling Laboratory at North Carolina State University.

Research
We will apply EOF, compositing, and correlation analyses of NARCCAP data to investigate the climate variability over North Carolina and the Southeast US. This will then be used to validate regionally downscaled climate data for DOI Climate Science Center impacts studies for climate adaptation and mitigation for the Southeast United States.

 
 
 

Richard Smith

email: rls@email.unc.edu
website: http://www.unc.edu/~rls/

I am a professor of statistics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

From July 1, 2010, I will also be Director of SAMSI, the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute. My research interests include statistical topics such as spatial statistics, time series analysis and extreme value theory, and applications in numerous fields. My interests in climate change include the statistical modeling of extreme climatic events, detection and attribution of climate change, and the combination of results from multi-model ensembles.


Research

I anticipate using NARCCAP data for a number of purposes, including new research on extremes and on multi-model ensembles, but my immediate interest is in the health effects of climate change. I have recently been reviewing the literature on epidemiological models relating extreme weather events to various kinds of human health outcomes; NARCCAP data will be valuable in projecting such models into the future. I am also working with a PhD student (Xuan Li) on extending some past work on multi-model ensembles to develop alternative statistical approaches and projections for small spatial scales.

 
 
 

Virginia Smith

email: virginia_smith@mail.utexas.edu

I'm a graduate student at the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin. I'm studying geomorphology of rivers and have an interest in how this is impacted by climate.


Research

Virginia is collaborating with Meinhard Cardenas to investigate the relationship between climate and drainage density across the Texas Gulf regional watershed. First, the drainage density was calculated using the National Hydrography Dataset Plus for each watershed within the region. The drainage density was then compared to average values for precipitation, evaporation, estimated effective precipitation (precipitation minus evaporation), and vegetation obtained from the North American Regional Reanalysis. The drainage density was also compared with the geology and topography of watershed. A correlation was found between drainage density and estimated effective precipitation. Virginia and Meinhard now plan to compare projected climate estimates with current climate conditions in order to assess potential landscape response to climate change in the Texas Gulf region.

 
 
 

Stefan Sobolowski

email: stefans@unc.edu

I am currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. I am perhaps best described as a hydroclimatologist. My research interests include but are not limited to: application of GCMs/RCMs to investigate dynamics of climate variability and climate change over multiple spatial and temporal scales; studying interactions and feedbacks between components of the hydrological cycle and the climate system; physical relationships between snow and climate; statistical modeling and analysis of phenomena related to hydroclimate and water resources.


Research

My current research is focused on developing hierarchical Bayesian space-time models of current and future regional hydroclimate. We seek to employ dynamical predictors to improve the modeling of spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation over diverse hydroclimatological regions of the United States. The NARCCAP data will enable us to identify strengths/shortcomings relative to the existing observations and our statistical models and aid in uncertainty reduction in future projections of regional climate change. In particular, we seek to obtain reliable probabilistic future projections of changes in frequency, intensity and duration of precipitation events using a combination of statistical modeling techniques and regional climate simulations.

 
 
 

Brian Soden

email: b.soden@miami.edu

My research uses satellite observations and climate model simulations to evaluate and understand model projections of future changes in the hydrological cycle.


Research

The main objectives of this research are: 1) to evaluate the ability of NARCCAP models to simulate the observed climatological characteristics of precipitaiton over Florida and the Carribean at a regional scale; 2) to compare climate model projections of the changes in precipitation for the 21st Century to those simulated from available NARCCAP models; and 3) to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the simulated changes in preicpitation. This research will use satellite observations and rain gauge measurements to evaluate the distribution, seasonal and interannual variability of precipitaton in this region to the IPCC AR4 and NARCCAP model simulations. Coarse resolution model output from AR4 will be compared to higher resolution simulations obtained from NARCCAP to evaluate the consistency of regional precipitation changes between the two model groups. This evaluation will provide the basis for assessing the robustness of the regional precipitation changes and for interpreting the physical mechanisms which underlie them.

 
 
 

Clement Sohoulande

email: sohoulande@tamu.edu

I'm a graduate student at Texas A&M University, my research interest is precipitation variability and vegetation dynamics.

Research
In my research I'm trying to understand seasonal precipitation variability impacts on vegetation dynamics at the watershed level. i will be using remote sensing data to assess vegetation dynamics. The main goal is to understand potential vegetation behavior and changes in terrestrial hydrological process under climate change.

 
 
 

Sheena Solomon

email: sheena@sca.uqam.ca

Post Doc at University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM), working under the supervision of Prof. Laxmi Sushama.

Research
Terrestrial snow cover serves as a sensitive indicator of global warming. It is very important to describe the snow cover area and albedo realistically in climate models in order to assess possible changes in the future climatic conditions. The Canadian RCM (CRCM5) simulations driven by ERA-40 reanalysis and CanESM2 at its lateral boundaries are used in this project to study the current and future trends in snow variability over the North American region in three time slices (1981-2010, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100). The output snow variables, such as snow depth (SD), snow cover fraction (SCF) and snow water equivalent (SWE), for the 1981-2010 period from CRCM-ERA is compared with different snow datasets. This comparison will help to assess model performance errors, i.e. errors due to physics and dynamics of the model. Similarly, comparison between the CRCM-ERA40 and CRCM-CanESM2 snow variables for the 1981-2010 period will help estimate the boundary forcing errors. The projected changes for the 2041-2070 and 2071-2100 periods are assessed by comparing snow changes for these period with that for the 1981-2010 reference period. The long-term snow trend analysis of CRCM simulation is performed using linear regression method and the Mann-Kendall statistical significance test (Kendall, 1975). This will be followed by validation of CRCM5 snow against an ensemble of regional climate model snow output (NARCCAP simulation) for North American region.

 
 
 

Guiting Song

email: songguiting@gmail.com

My research field includes ocean remote sensing, climate change analysis and modelling the ocean circulation.


Research

I would like to use NARCCAP data as referee to retrieve wind and wave information from satellite data. Satellite data including SAR image, altimeter data, scatterometer data and Quikscat data will be used in my study. High resolution NARCCAP data will be a great help for my study in the future.

 
 
 

Fabiola Sosa Rodriguez

email: fssosa@gmail.com

Posdoctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo, ON, Canada. Department of Geography and Environmental Management. Currently working on RCMs for the Grand River Watershed under the supervision of Linda Mortsh. Research interest: analyze climate change impacts in Mexico (some of its states where information is available) using RCMs.

Research
I would like to analyze climate change impacts in Mexico (the states where information is available), particular hydrological, by using RCMs. Compare the expected impacts in terms of temperature and precipitation between GCM and RCM. To this end, I would like to explore daily and 3-hourly data for Tmax, Tmin and Precip. The RCM model (s) selection will be based on the quality and reliability of the outputs.

 
 
 

Jon Souder

email: jsouder@cooswatershed.org
website: http://www.cooswatershed.org

Incorporated as a private, not-for-profit organization in 1994, the Coos Watershed Association (CoosWA) is one of the oldest community-based watershed stewardship organizations in the Pacific Northwest. The CoosWA is widely recognized as a leading watershed organization in a field of more than 90 such organizations throughout the state of Oregon. The mission of CoosWA is to “provide a framework to coordinate and implement proven management practices, and test promising new management practices, designed to support environmental integrity and economic stability for communities of the Coos Watershed. We focus on the Coos River watershed—the roughly 900,000 acre area containing all lands and waters that drain into the Pacific Ocean through the Coos estuary. The Coos river watershed lies within Oregon’s South Coast Basin, includes the coastal frontal areas south to Bandon including parts of Coos and Douglas counties, and the communities of Charleston, Coos Bay, North Bend and Allegany. CoosWA conducts operations outside of the watershed when projects are consistent with the Association’s mission and 2005-2015 Strategic Framework.


Research

We have, and are, rapidly evolving our watershed restoration approach to explicitly incorporate anticipated effects of climate change. We have done this in both on-the-ground projects to improve in-stream habitat, particularly in larger streams and rivers, as well as in coarser scale watershed assessments and restoration action plans.

Key information that is vital to improve our understanding is changes in temperatures, particularly in summer, as well as changes in precipitation.

We will use the information that we obtain in hydrological/hydraulic modeling for specific fish passage situations, to adjust the regional curves that we use to predict runoff, as well as for summer stream water temperature modeling.

The outcome we anticipate from having high-quality climate data is to pioneer the development and implementation of "clime-ready watershed restoration".

 
 
 

Mathini Sreetharan

email: msreetharan@dewberry.com

I am a senior engineer working with Dewberry, a consulting firm in virginia. Senior engineer 30 years of experience in watershed/floodplain modeling. Recent interests are real-time/forecast modeling, climate projections for riverine floodplains, coastal/riverine interactions.


Research

Currently, we are developing climate projections for the year 2060 to estimate change in 100-year floodplain area nationally. This project is for FEMA.

 
 
 

Venkat Sridhar

email: vsridhar@boisestate.edu


Research
We would like to conduct an investigation of land-atmosphere feedbacks in a changing climate. While we have access to other climate model-downscaled products, we would like to use NARCCAP to cross-validate projected impacts for the western U.S. Our current work involves implementing macroscale hydrology models to evaluate the streamflow projections, primarily for the natural ecosystems. This would eventually be extended to managed ecosystems where diversion and return flows become important factors when considering future trends in streamflow. Our analysis will be useful for local, state and federal agencies that are interested in formulating water resources planning policies in a changing environment.

 
 
 

Latham Stack

email: lstack@syntectic.com


Research
My team has performed research since 2005 on uncertainty in stormwater adaptation. Our current project is sited in Minneapolis, MN, funding from NOAA's Climate Program Office Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP). Collaborating organizations include the City of Minneapolis, the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District, Antioch University New England, the University of Minnesota, and Stratus Consulting Inc. Previous studies were sited in coastal New Hampshire (EPA Region I pilot project for the Climate Ready Estuaries program), and central New Hampshire (funded by the SARP program).

 
 
 

Lydia Stefanova

email: lstefanova@coaps.fsu.edu

Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306-4520
tel 850 645 8497


Research

I am generally interested in issues relating to Southeast US climate, including its variability, change, and prediction.

I plan to assess the skill and predictability of NARCCAP regional models' hindcasts for the Southeast US. I would like to diagnose the sources of predictability and skill on regional scales and compare those with results obtained using statistical methods.

I am also interested in the optimal combination - based on hindcast performance - of multi-model forecasts for probabilistic prediction of near surface climate, and the application of such optimal combination to future scenarios that would then be used for driving agricultural and ecological impact models.

 
 
 

Ariel Stein

email: ariel.stein@noaa.gov


Research
Research goals: To understand the effect of the inclusion of more detailed description of the physical parametrizations and higher resolution in regional weather models give a better climate information.
Research method: Use NARCCAP data as boundary conditions to drive higher resolution WRF runs to determine the effect of different physical parametrizations on the rain amounts.
Significance of this work: Determining the best physical parameters can give more accurate information to decision makers about future climate scenarios.

 
 
 

Allison Steiner

email: alsteiner@umich.edu
website: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alsteine/


Research

My research group uses RegCM3 to evaluate the impact of atmospheric chemistry on regional climate. Additionally, we have added a new land surface model scheme to RegCM3 based on the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM). Ultimately, we are working to couple emissions from the biosphere with atmospheric chemistry and climate and evaluate radiative forcings at the regional scale. NARCCAP data would be useful for us to evaluate our model simulations versus other models.

 
 
 

Scott Steinschneider

email: scottsteinschneider@gmail.com

I am currently a PhD student at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst working in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. The goal of my research is to understand how water resources systems can be designed and managed sustainably for the future. Currently, my work is primarily focused on examining the intersection between anthropogenic, climatic, and hydrologic systems with an emphasis on water resources risk management under climate variability and change. Through my research I hope to provide insight into new water resources management techniques that could help adapt water systems to a nonstationary environment.

Research
My work is primarily focused on examining the intersection between anthropogenic, climatic, and hydrologic systems with an emphasis on water resources risk management under climate variability and change. I plan to use the NARCCAP data to explore potential future climate changes and their effect on water resource systems throughout the US. Specifically, I plan to investigate whether the current set of RCMs in the NARCCAP dataset reproduce some of the driving atmospheric circulation patterns that preceded the devastating floods in the Midwest during 1993 and 2008.

 
 
 

Eric Stephan

email: eric.stephan@pnl.gov
website: http://www.linkedin.com/in/ericstephan

I am a computer scientist focusing on research and development of scientific data management systems.

Research
I am collaborating with Ruby Leung on a model integration effort and need access to her data that she has stored in the ESG.

 
 
 

Mark Stone

email: mark.stone@dri.edu

Mark Stone, PhD
Desert Research Institute
755 E Flamingo Road
Las Vegas, NV 89119


Research

I am interested in using NARCCAP data products to support my research on impacts of climate change on water resources. Specifically, my research is now focussed on modified precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater recharge patterns in the Great Basin.

 
 
 

John Strack

email: jstrack@umd.edu

I am currently a Research Associate in the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) located at the University of Maryland College Park.

Research
I am interested in further downscaling the NARCCAP results for use in climate change assessments for the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. I plan to use WRF, run with horizontal grid increments of less than 10 km, to accomplish this. The output from my simulations will then be used to drive the SWAT hydrology model and the ChesROMS ocean model over the Chesapeake Bay. We hope the results will shed some light on future changes to bay water quality, and harmful algal bloom and sea nettle outbreaks.

 
 
 

Diana Stralberg

email: dstralberg@prbo.org
website: http://www.prbo.org

Landscape Ecologist
PRBO Conservation Science
3820 Cypress Drive #11
Petaluma, CA 94954


Research

Main research goals: Identify potential future distributions of breeding birds in California, based on climate and land use change projections

Research methods: We are using species point occurrence data, climate surfaces, and vegetation surfaces to develop statistical models of species' distributions, using maximum entropy (MaxEnt) modeling and generalized additive models (GAMs). We have used PRISM (800-m) climate data to develop the models and generate spatial predictions for current period. We are using the delta method to calculate differences between model outputs for current and future temperature and precipitation variables, and then add the change to current PRISM surfaces to maintain current patterns of local climate variation. We then plan to predict current and future species distributions (and vegetation change) under various climate change scenarios and using different models (we currently have just one).

Research plan: (1) Generate current distribution models and subject them to expert review; (2) Generate future predictions for a range of climate models and emission scenarios; (3) Overlay climate predictions with land use change projections.

What data are needed: Downscaled current and future climate projections for California for a range of scenarios (including A2 or A1fi if possible) and GCMs (at least two). Min/mean/max monthly temperature and monthly precipitation are of greatest interest, but other variables such as relative humidity and cloud cover would also be very useful. Resolution should be at least 50-km grid cells, although higher resolution is preferable.

Anticipated findings or significance of work: We hope to identify species and habitats of future conservation concern (based on both climate and land use change), and provide land managers with future scenarios and projections for areas under their jurisdiction.

 
 
 

Randy Striplin

email: rstriplin@fs.fed.us

I am a fire ecologist for the US Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. I recently returned to school in the PhD progran in Geography at the University of Nevada, Reno.


Research

I am a US Forest Service fire ecologist who recently returned to school to seek a PhD in geography. I want to study fire-climate in interactions, particularly in the PNW/SW preciptation dipole transistion zone in Northern California. I am currently learning about climatology, models, reanalyses, and other data that may help me develop my dissertation project. Can more accurate seasonal and long-lead forecasting methods be developed for this area?

 
 
 

Hua Su

email: edward_su@mail.utexas.edu

I am a research scientist associate in the University of Texas at Austin. Research interests include:

  • Regional climate simulation and prediction
  • Large-scale soil moisture-precipitation feedback
  • Land surface hydrological modeling
  • Snow-climate interaction
  • Land data assimilation using ensemble approaches


Research

Use NARCCAP data to study the regional hydrological responses to climate change in Texas, including soil moisture, runoff and ecological system. Particularly, we would use downscaled NARCCAP data to force regional hydrological model.

 
 
 

Edward Sudicky

email: sudicky@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca

Dr. Sudicky is a full professor in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Waterloo and holds a senior-level Canada Research Chair in Quantitative Hydrogeology. His research interest is in development and application of advanced numerical models of hydrological processes, including fully-integrated surface and subsurface water flow, multiphase flow and the fate of contaminants in the subsurface. He along with Prof. R. Therrien is lead developer of the 3D HydroGeoSphere model, a parallel code used to simulate coupled surface and subsurface hydrology, contaminant migration and thermal energy transport at the watershed scale and beyond. HydroGeoSphere is being used worldwide by academic and industry users to address a wide range of water resources problems that involve both water quantity and quality. Honours: Professor Sudicky is a recipient of a number of international awards and honours for his research contributions that include the National Ground Water Association Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer (1994) and M. King Hubbert Award (2007), The Geological Society of America O.E. Meinzer Award (1999), The American Geophysical Union Hydrology Award (2002). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Canadian Academy of Engineering, the American Geophysical Union and the Geological Society of America.

Research
My research is primarily focusing on integrated surface/subsurface water flow modelling at the watershed and larger scales, coupled with contaminant migration and heat transport. Our 3D HydroGeoSphere (HGS)model is a control-volume finiate element model that simultaneously solves the nonlinear 2D depth-integrated diffusion-wave describing water flow over the land surface and the 3D nonlinear Richards' equation describing variably-saturated water flow in the subsurface. Likewise, HGS solve the 2D and 3D forms of the advection-dispersion equations for modelling solute and heat transport in the surface and subsurface flow regimes. My group and other users have been applying HGS to watersheds at various scales, from a few tens to several thousands of km^2. Currently I have a PhD student that is applying HGS to assess climate change impacts on Canada's surface and subsurface water resources. We have constructed a 3D model covering the entire Canadian land mass and am collaborating with Prof. W.R. (Dick) Peltier at the University of Toronto. His group has been providing us with downscaled climate projections over the next century which we are using to drive HGS. We are computing projected changes to river baseflows, lake water depths, groundwater recharge/discharge patterns, watertable depths, etc. My PhD student, Jeremy Chen, would like to access any additional climate scenarios that may be available via NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Wen-Yih Sun

email: wysun@purdue.edu

Professor
Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
Purdue University


Research

We have developed the Purdue Regional Climate Model (PRCM) and others, and worked on numerical schemes, instability, turbulence-pollution, dryline, mountain waves, lee-vortex, storm and cyclones, cloud, rainband, vegetation-snow-land-model, drought, flood, monsoon, and regional climate, etc.

We will apply the PRCM, driven by the reanalysis and/or GCMs, to study the weather/climate in N. America and compare with other RCMs and GCMs simulations.

 
 
 

Xuguang Sun

email: xgsun@nju.edu.cn

My research interests include high-resolution regional climate modeling and land-atmosphere interaction.


Research

I'd like to use the NARCCAP data as the reference, to compare with my own regional climate modelings over the northern America, so that the advantages and disadvantages of new configurations of regional climate model can be evaluated.

 
 
 

Ying Sun

email: sunwards@galton.uchicago.edu

My research interests include spatial and spatio-temporal statistics, climate model uncertainty quantification, complex data visualization, statistics of extremes, time series analysis, meteorological and environmental applications.

Research
I plan to apply our proposed heat wave models to NARCCAP data, estimate the return level of the extreme event and compare to the observed data. I also plan to compare different model runs in the functional ANOVA framework for both mean and spatial variability.

 
 
 

Mike Sunde

email: mgsnd9@mail.missouri.edu
website: http://gis.missouri.edu

Graduate student at the University of Missouri, School of Natural Resources, Department of Forestry, GIS Lab

Research
Currently assessing the effects of urbanization and climate change on the water regime in an urban watershed.

 
 
 

Kelly Suttles

email: kmsuttle@ncsu.edu
website: http://sites.google.com/site/kmsuttle2/

I am earning a Masters degree in Natural Resources from NC State University with a GIS technical option to use as a representational and analytic tool for natural resource conservation and management in the next phase of my career.

Research

For my thesis research I am using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to model the effects of land use and climate change on water resources within the Uwharrie National Forest in North Carolina./p>

Specific research questions are
How might changing land use patterns in the Yadkin-Peedee River basin impact surface water in Uwharrie National Forest?
If surface water is impacted, then
a. What types of land use have the biggest impact?
b. How does the spatial arrangement of land uses influence impacts; i.e., what are the critical zones of influence?
c. How will changing surface water conditions impact aquatic species?
2. How does land use change influence water quality downstream of the UNF boundary?

To produce future simulations using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, I need daily weather data (min/max temp, precipitation, etc.) such as NARCCAP data. I will be using ArcGIS/ArcSWAT and additionally will use USGS National Elevation Dataset DEMs (30m), USDA-NRCS Soil Survey Geographic Database, USGS historical stream gage discharges, NCDC historical weather data, and land cover/land use data projections provided by the US Forest Service as part of the Southern Forest Futures Project (Dave Wear/John Coulston).

The findings of this research will be useful to the US Forest Service in their management of fragmented national forests such as the Uwharrie as well as local municipalities in their management of water resources within urbanized areas.

 
 
 

Bohumil Svoma

email: bsvoma@asu.edu

I'm a Research Associate and Lecturer at the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University. Research Interests: Climate change and variability with a focus on snow in mountainous regions.

Research
I will compare 1971-2000 and 2041-2070 DJF wet-bulb zero heights derived from variables in Table 1 through Table 5 for given watersheds in the western United States. With everything else held constant (e.g., precipitation intensity, duration, etc...) these differences will approximate the projected changes in snow level elevation. At this stage, I anticipate using as many RCM/AOGCM combinations as possible.

The major results will be projected changes in land area receiving snowfall for given watersheds in the western United States.

 
 
 

Harris Switzman

email: hswitzman@trca.on.ca
website: http://climateontario.org

I am the project manager of climate adaptation for the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and the Ontario Climate Consortium Secretariat. Through these organizations, we work to conduct risk and vulnerability research, in addition to facilitating the use of climate projections in public sector decision making.


Research

OUTCOMES AND GOALS
Currently, local government agencies in Ontario are using a variety of different climate model projections in assessments of climate change risk and vulnerabilities, adaptation planning and impact modeling. There is a wide range of projections available to be used in such studies, and many existing projects have relied upon a single realization to assess impacts. Examples include high-resolution downscaling in the Toronto Region and crop-response modeling in Peterborough. In some cases, the projections used vary significantly depending upon the global circulation model, downscaling techniques, and scenario used, and results from these individual projects for the same geographic may location produce diverging trends, especially for precipitation-related variables.

The objective of this work is to produce a local ensemble for select locations in Ontario, Canada to compare how different climate models, downscaling techniques, and climate change scenarios compare. The intended outcome is the preparation of a comprehensive ensemble for the selected study areas that can be used to compare the sensitivity of different downscaling techniques, climate scenarios and global circulation model selections. This ensemble will also be used to situate existing projections withing the broader uncertainty characterized by the ensemble and will assist in developing guidance for selecting scenarios to use in future projects.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PLAN
The approach to be employed is to compare existing downscaled projections and raw global circulation model output. Three to five study areas in Ontario will be selected based on the availability of existing climate change projections. Projections from these existing studies will be compiled and variables of interest for comparison will be selected. Once these variables are selected, their statistical distributions will be compared with one another. An ensemble of projections from CMIP5 and CMIP3 global circulation models will then be established and the individual projections from previous studies will be compared to the broader CMIP ensembles. Additionally, multiple scenarios from CMIP3 and CMIP5 will be compared, along with downscaling techniques.

We have begun to compile much of the existing data, and the next step will require us to use the dynamically downscaled projections produced through NARCCAP.

 
 
 

Jozef Syktus

email: syktus@nrm.qld.gov.au

Queensland Department of Natural Resources


Research

Would like to have access to limited volume of data from NCAR model in order to study large scale circulation changes in Southern Hemisphere and links to Australian rainfall change and variability.

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 
 

Haider Taha

email: haider@altostratus.com
website: http://www.altostratus.com

Haider Taha (PhD 1990, University of California at Berkeley) is a meteorological and photochemical modeler focusing on the urban environment. He has been actively engaged in meteorological, emissions, energy, and photochemical/air quality modeling and research since starting his graduate studies at Berkeley in 1985. His masters and doctoral theses developed methodologies and incorporated early efforts in "urbanizing" mesoscale meteorological models, improving boundary-layer parameterizations and urban canopy-layer representations, thus improving the regional specificity of simulations and the accuracy of dependent photochemical, energy demand, and thermal environmental modeling. In 2003, Haider resigned from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to start Altostratus Inc. (where he currently is) and in 2004 was appointed as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Meteorology at San Jose State University. At LBNL, he was a post-doctoral fellow from 1990 to 1992 and then a Staff Scientist from 1992 to 2003. There, he was the lead meteorological and photochemical modeler on the heat island group's studies and projects funded by the US DOE, US EPA, NASA, CEC, TAF, SCE, CIEE, NRDC, and UCS. Haider has published on the topics of heat islands, urban climates, meteorology, and regional/mesoscale meteorological-photochemical modeling (see partial list of publications on www.altostratus.com), has served as a technical reviewer for scientific peer-reviewed publications, technical proposals, guest editor, and invited contributor to book and encyclopedia sections on meteorology and heat islands. He is a full member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the International Association for Urban Climate (IAUC), the Urban Climate Change Research Network (UCCRN), a number of regional and regulatory modeling working groups, and was a technical supervisor for scholars and visiting scientists with LBNL and a thesis committee member for graduate students at San Jose State University and the University of California (Berkeley and Los Angeles).


Research

The NARCCAP data will be used in dynamical downscaling to provide boundary conditions to mesoscale (~5km resolution) and meso-urban (~1 km resolution) meteorological models such as MM5, WRF, and their urbanized versions (uMM5 and WRF-URBAN). The downscaled meteorological fields will then be used in emissions and photochemical modeling of future-year conditions. Of interest is studying urban areas and quantifying the potential of a range of regional mitigation measures, such as heat island and emission control, in offsetting the local energy and air-quality impacts of long-term changes in climate.

 
 
 

Muhammad Naveed Tahir

email: naveed@uaar.edu.pk

I am faculty member at PMAS-Arid Agriculture University Rawalpindi, Pakistan. I am working on climate change so I want to access the data related to climate change.


Research

I am working related to integration of crop model and regional climate change model for assessing the potential of climate on crop production in rainfed areas of Pakistan.

 
 
 

Shuchi Talati

email: stalati@andrew.cmu.edu

I'm a PhD student at Carnegie Mellon University in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy.


Research

I'm researching water demand from thermoelectric power plants in the context of climate change in the southwest. Using a variety of models, regional climate model temperature data would be used to estimate water consumption over the next century.

 
 
 

Kevin Talgo

email: talgo@email.unc.edu

Research Associate at the Institute for the Environment at UNC Chapel Hill

Research

Effects of Climate Change on Human Health: Current and Future Impacts

Description: In this project we examine how climatic variations and the corresponding air quality conditions may aggravate heat- and cold-related morbidity among adults and vulnerable populations: in particular, the poor, the aging and children. We will demonstrate our analysis in the state of North Carolina. North Carolina displays substantial variability in weather (mountains to seaboard), population density (rural versus urban/suburban), and regional patterns of land use (urban/suburban versus forest versus agricultural).

Objectives/Hypothesis: The overall goal of the proposed research project is to define more precisely the interrelationships among (a) changes in climate and meteorological conditions, (b) air pollution, and (c) heat- and cold-related morbidity severe enough to warrant clinical contact. A secondary goal is to evaluate heat-related morbidity in a vulnerable population: children and adults under economic disadvantage. We propose a novel approach that views climate trends and the associated weather in terms of eight identified air-mass/weather types. We hypothesize that such air masses and the corresponding air quality conditions will have different health impacts on humans, which can be quantified based on statistical analyses of the correlates among the meteorological, climate, air quality, and health data.

Approach: Our work will consist of the following steps: (1) Characterize weather patterns and circulation types over the state of North Carolina; (2) examine temporal and regional variability in meteorological and climatological patterns of the state of North Carolina to identify abnormalities related to climate fluctuation, including weather patterns related to events such as El Niño, and to describe their relationship to air pollution; (3) identify meteorological and climatological correlates of variability in air pollution across the state's highly variable geographic regions over a period of ten years to define the year-to-year reproducibility of the meteorological-air pollution relationship, and to assess changing trends in the relationship over time; (4) establish two mordibity databases, one of hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease, asthma, heat syncope and influenza among all North Carolina residents, and a second database of emergency room visits, physician visits, and costs for the same disease outcomes for Medicaid recipients; (5) address the potential mismatch in the scale of climate, air quality and health data bases to insure the validity of the statistical correlations among various parameters; (6) correlate the occurrence of health data with changes in meteorological and air quality parameters to define the relative risk and attributable fraction of asthma and cardiovascular morbidity in relation to air pollution; (7) apply these predictive statistical models to three geographic regions within the state (mountains, Piedmont and coastal plain) to determine whether the relationship between climate changes and heat- and cold-related morbidity varies in different geographic frameworks (e.g., urban vs. rural agricultural vs. rural non-agricultural areas); (8) examine the use of the global climate and air quality modeling systems to address future regional health impacts of climate variations; and (9) provide an assessment of uncertainty in quantifying the potential impact of climate variability on health using the proposed data and modeling analyses.

Data Needed: Hourly surface meteorological data (temperature, winds, pressure, etc.) for one or two future years (year 2040 or after)

Expected Results: We anticipate that the characteristics of the climate . air pollution relationship across North Carolina over time will be generalizable throughout the US, and that our proposed study will yield important insights regarding the impact of climate change and air pollution on heat- and cold-related morbidity, thus advancing our knowledge of the health effects of climate change and their predictability. Findings on applying environmental and climate data to decrease heat- and cold-related morbidity could result in a substantial public health impact, not just in North Carolina but throughout the United States.

 
 
 

Bo Tao

email: taobo.eco@gmail.com

Postdoctoral fellow
Auburn University
Research interests: climate change, land use/cover changes impacts on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles.


Research
I want to use NARCCAP data to run a process-based ecosystem model to investigate impacts of future climate change on carbon and water cycles across lower 48 states of U.S.

 
 
 

Hui Tao

email: taohui0911@gmail.com


Research
Climate changes and their impacts on water resources in the arid regions, climate change downscaling, Assessment of CMIP3 climate models and projected changes of precipitation and temperature

 
 
 

Francisco Tapiador

email: francisco.tapiador@uclm.es
website: http://www.fjtapiador.com

Associate Professor at UCLM, Spain NASA/Caltech, JPL (Section 334H affiliate) [contact to: francisco.j.tapiador@jpl.nasa.gov]

Research
I will intercompare NARCCAP precipitation outputs with observational databases, as previously done with data from the PRUDENCE and ENSEMBLES projects over Europe.

 
 
 

Abdul Tariq

email: atariq@rand.org

Abdul Ahad Tariq is a doctoral student at PRGS. Previously he was a research assistant in public and labor economics at the Harvard Kennedy School. He received his B.S. in chemistry (emphasis in chemical physics) from the California Institute of Technology. His undergraduate research was in experimental and theoretical physical chemistry, with projects on engineering peptides for cancer detection, applying scattering theory and computer simulations to study chemical reaction dynamics, and using graph theory to develop quantitative measures of protein evolution. At Harvard, he was involved in a project to investigate behavioral decisionmaking and the role of cognitive limitations on the design of social insurance programs. He also conducted research related to the economics of U.S healthcare and medical industry.


Research

Main research goals: We're part of a team at the RAND Corporation which has developed a decision-support tool called Robust Decision Making to inform policy formulation in areas subject to "deep uncertainty", such as climate change.

Research methods: We use a variety of quantitative, large-scale simulation tools which enable us to run thousands of scenarios of climate-change and see how various climate mitigation policies help alleviate the detrimental impacts of climate change.

Research plans: Our research plan is to use climate projections from NARCCAP to simulate the impact of climate-change on pollutant loadings in the North Farm Creek watershed in Illinois. We plan to simulate a variety of climate-mitigation policies (such as watershed Best Management Practices) to see how well they will help the watershed cope with the impacts of climate change.

Data: Downscaled GCM projections for the North Farm Creek region in Illinois.

Anticipated findings/significance: This research project should help determine how a variety of different watershed Best Management Practices will perform under a variety of future climate change scenarios.

 
 
 

Ramesh Teegavarapu

email: rteegava@fau.edu
website: http://www.cege.fau.edu/directory

I am an assistant professor at Florida Atlantic University, Civil, Environmental and Geomatics Department. I work on climate change with reference to extreme precipitation and teleconnections, climate change decision making, water resources management for future.


Research

I would like use NARCCAP data for studying Atlantic Multi-decadal oscillations influencing south Florida precipitation.

 
 
 

Kameelah Temple

email: ktemple@deltaone.com

GIS Analyst/Associate at Delta Development Group.

Kameelah has received a Bachelor of Science degree in geoenvironmental science and a geospatial information science certification from Shippensburg University.


Research

Delta would like to explore the possibilities of opening a new market. The market would be to to help municipalities, states, and/or counties with designing Comprehensive Plans with the adaptations for the regions with clear understanding of climate change and its possible effects.

 
 
 

Duncan Temple Lang

email: duncan@wald.ucdavis.edu

Professor of Statistics, UC Davis

Research
Computation, Visualization, Education, Climate.                                                

 
 
 

Barbara Tencer

email: btencer@uvic.ca

I'm a posdoc at the Climate Modelling Lab of the University of Victoria.

Research
I'm analysing the relationship between extreme temperature and extreme precipitation events. As for now I've been seeking a statistical relationship based on observed data in Canada. I'd like to try if the same type of relation is found in climate model simulations.

 
 
 

Adam Terando

email: adam_terando@ncsu.edu

Affiliation: North Carolina State University

Research
The goal of this research is to provide an intercomparison of output from multiple downscaling methods in order to better quantify the structural uncertainty in these type of climate projections. Methods will include use of model output statistics, Taylor Diagrams, and perhaps Bayesian Model Averaging to compare output (hindcasts and projections) from statistical and dynamical climate projections. Anticipated findings are that surface air temperature projections (and derived impact-relevant indices) are comparable between methods but that precipitation and other variables that reflect more complex atmospheric processes will show wide disparities for sub-regional spatio-temporal scales.

 
 
 

Jeanne Thibeault

email: jeanne.thibeault@uconn.edu

I am a post-doctoral researcher in the Geography Dept. at the University of Connecticut.

Research
I will be working on a NOAA funded project that will evaluate regional climate change in the Northeast US with PIs Anji Seth and Linda Mearns.

 
 
 

Greg Thoma

email: gthoma@uark.edu
website: http://www.uark.edu


Research

We are developing process models to assess the environmental impact of animal agriculture in the US. We are also incorporating scenario analysis to support evaluation of both mitigation and adaptation technologies and management practices. We will use the NARCCAP datasets to drive building heating/cooling requirements as well as animal performance (they generally eat less and grow more slowly in hot weather). The model will be used in both education and outreach, and scaled to regional levels will, we anticipate, provide information to policy makers that can influence incentives for adoption of beneficial management practices.